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James Manzo 2019-11-11
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How about the collision of an experimental car with a woman walking across a street?

During an interview aired on Sunday, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said he believed both were mistakes.

The interview, filmed with journalists Mike Allen and Dan Primack for the program Axios on HBO, touched on the company’s relationship to its fifth largest shareholder, the Saudi Arabia sovereign wealth fund.

“That government said that they made a mistake,” Khosrowshahi said of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, in a response to a question about Uber’s continued relationship with Saudi Arabia.

(Last year, the Washington Post columnist disappeared into the Saudi Arabian embassy in Turkey; a few months later, the CIA concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman himself had ordered the journalist’s assassination.)

“We've made mistakes, too, with self-driving, and we stopped driving and we're recovering from that mistake.

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0
William Ly 2018-10-20
img

Surveillance footage published by Turkish newspaper Hurriyet purports to show Jamal Khashoggi entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2.CCTV/Hurriyet via AP

Twitter has suspended hundreds of bot accounts identified by NBC News as being involved in a coordinated campaign to defend the Saudi government's role in the disappearance of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

Twitter told Business Insider it had already been aware of the bot accounts, which it said behaved like spam accounts.

Twitter said it could not definitively link the accounts to the Saudi government.

Twitter is suspending hundreds of bot accounts involved in a coordinated effort to flood the service with political messages about the suspected murder of a prominent Saudi dissident.

The accounts have unleashed a barrage of messages in recent days that support the Saudi government's account in its role in the disappearance of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, according to NBC News which reported about the situation on Thursday.

collect
0
Marie Haines 2021-07-19
img

A string of reports from a new consortium called the Pegasus Project is shedding light on how an invasive piece of spyware has been used to target journalists and activists around the world. As the investigation aims to throw light on significant events cased by the spyware,here’s a rundown of what these initial reports have revealed so far. What is Pegasus? Pegasus is a type of spyware developed by Israel-based NSO Group. It could reside on your phone and track all your activities. Pegasus entered the limelight in 2019, when it allegedly exploited a bug in WhatsApp to gain access to hundreds of…

This story continues at The Next Web
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0
Charles Rodriguez 2018-10-15
img

People protest the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Security and technical commentators have cast doubt on reports from the Turkish media that journalist Jamal Khashoggi's "torture and death" inside the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul was captured by his Apple watch and sent to his iPhone.

Khashoggi is a Saudi Arabian journalist writing for the Washington Post, and he has been missing since 2 October when he was last seen walking into his home country's embassy in Turkey.

According to media reports, Turkish officials say they have evidence of Kashoggi's murder inside the embassy, and that the journalist actually recorded what happened to him on his Apple Watch.

Some have speculated that it's more likely the reports are a cover story, and the Turkish government had other means of obtaining information about Khashoggi.

Technology and security experts are disputing the reports from Turkish press, reportedly seeded by Turkish officials, that journalist Jamal Khashoggi's Apple watch captured audio of him being tortured and killed inside the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul.

collect
0
Marie Haines 2018-12-12
img

British ministers have approved the export of more than £2.4m worth of telecoms snooping gear to Saudi Arabia, in spite of its very obvious human rights problems, according to a report.

Five licences were granted to send "telecommunications interception equipment" to the controversial kingdom, which was most recently in the news over the murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside its embassy in Istanbul.

The deal was brought to light by Freedom of Information requests from political news website Politics Home.

This year, the site reported, ministers from the Department of International Trade signed off three permanent contracts worth £2.4m for the export of interception kit.

International Trade Secretary Liam Fox is a former Defence Secretary, while Saudi Arabia remains one of the top destinations for British-made military kit such as fighter jets.

It appears that that also includes British-designed equipment whose primary purpose is internal surveillance.

collect
0
Porter Johnson 2021-03-23
img
A top Saudi official reportedly threatened to have the UN's Khashoggi investigator "taken care of" during a January 2020 meeting in Geneva.
collect
0
Calvin Muchow 2018-10-15
img

Microsoft wants its tech to be used for good, not evil, the company's CEO said.

Satya Nadella, speaking Monday at the Wired25 conference in San Francisco, noted that the tech industry has a responsibility for how its technology is used.

"We start from saying, look we want to take tech and empower the world with it," Nadella said.

Big tech has been facing questions lately about who it does business with.

Employees at companies like Google have protested the use of its technology -- from cloud computing to artificial intelligence -- by the Defense Department.

Saudi Arabia has been building relationships in the technology industry, particularly through its partnership with Japanese telecom giant SoftBank.

collect
0
Stuart Smith 2020-09-08
img
Trump's foreign policy and boosting of arms sales has helped exacerbate conflicts like the devastating war in Yemen.
collect
0
Alfred Borrow 2019-02-18

The Japanese conglomerate SoftBank and Mubadala, the Abu Dhabi state investment company, have a closely intertwined relationship, and it’s one that the two are further cementing.

According to the Financial Times, SoftBank has just committed half the capital for a new $400 million fund from Mubadala that aims to back European startups.

Soon after, Mubadala opened a San Francisco office, as well as structured a $400 million fund designed to invest in early-stage startups to which SoftBank committed some capital.

The pact was understandable, including because Mubadala’s early-stage fund could theoretically provide SoftBank with a better idea of what’s happening at companies that are earlier in their trajectories than SoftBank typically sees.

The move was also meant to better enable Mubadala to oversee the money it committed to SoftBank.

The newer fund appears to be raising questions, however.

collect
0
Charles Michels 2018-10-11
img

Police investigating the missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi are searching for his Apple Watch to obtain his health and location data before his disappearance.

But that may prove impossible, according to new details learned by TechCrunch.

His soon-to-be wife was waiting outside the consulate with Khashoggi’s iPhone.

Khashoggi never emerged from the consulate, sparking a manhunt.

The Washington Post reports that U.S. intercepts showed efforts by the Saudi crown prince Mohammad bin Salman to lure the reporter back to the kingdom and detain him.

The Saudi kingdom has denied any involvement with his disappearance.

collect
0
Warren Edwards 2018-10-22
img

Twitter fired an engineer in 2015 after intelligence officials alerted the company to the fact that he might be a mole working for Saudi Arabia, The New York Times reports.

Ali Alzabarah was reportedly hired in 2013 and subsequently groomed by Saudi intelligence operatives to spy on dissident accounts.

Twitter could not find evidence that Alzabarah sent user data to the Saudi government, but fired him in December 2015.

Twitter fired an engineer after the company was tipped off by intelligence officials that he may have been groomed by the Saudi government, The New York Times reports.

In a report which claimed that a troll army working for Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman harassed dissidents like murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the Times said Twitter was told about a potential mole on its books at the end of 2015.

Ali Alzabarah joined Twitter in 2013 and rose to an engineering post that gave him access to user details such as phone numbers and IP addresses, the Times reports.

collect
0
Linda Schilk 2018-10-19

Twitter botnets are having to adapt their behavior in the wake of the platform’s crackdown.

NBC News reports that on Thursday the platform suspended hundreds of accounts acting in a network to tweet messages of support for Saudi Arabia in the wake of the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Experts quoted in the report said that the bots operated in a way that allowed them to “fly under the radar” to avoid Twitter’s bans.

Turkish investigators have claimed that Khashoggi was killed by Saudi agents associated with the Saudi prince Mohammad Bin Salman during a visit to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

The Saudi government vehemently denies these allegations, and it’s this version of events that the botnet was amplifying.

Twitter has now suspended the bots brought to light by NBC News, as well as other pro-Saudi government accounts, although it hasn’t officially said who’s behind them.

collect
0
James Bice 2018-11-04

Throughout October, it seemed that among others in tech, SoftBank might be forced to rethink its cozy relationship with Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, or MBS, who has charmed many captains of industry since rising to power, but whose dark side came into abrupt view over the murder and gruesome disposal of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

(MBS has steered Saudi Arabia into plenty of other terribleness, but the brutal end of Khashoggi, a resident of Virginia, a Washington Post columnist, and a critic of MBS, managed to capture the West’s attention in a way that tens of thousands of dead Yemeni children have not.)

Certainly, parting ways with MBS wouldn’t be easy for SoftBank, whose CEO, Masayoshi Son, has said that his ambitious Vision Fund, which finally closed this past May with $100 billion in commitments, is anchored by MBS.

In fact, Son has said that MBS committed $45 billion to the effort in 45 minutes time, and MBS more recently revealed his intention to give SoftBank a separate $45 billion for a second Vision Fund.

That’s a lot of money to turn down.

Still, for a minute, it seemed that SoftBank might legitimately be having second thoughts about whether it’s good to be in business with MBS.

collect
0
Matthew Hansen 2021-07-23
Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Throughout the past week, we’ve seen story after story about a company called NSO Group, and a piece of spyware called Pegasus. Some of the stories have been shocking, with allegations that fully updated smartphones can be hacked with a single text message, and reports that two women close to murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi were among those targeted by a government agency using the spy tool.

A coalition of news outlets, including The Washington Post, Le Monde, and The Guardian is behind the reporting, and they’re calling it the Pegasus Project. The project was led by Forbidden Stories, an organization of journalists that works on stories after the original reporters have been silenced in some way. Amnesty International ran detailed...

Continue reading…

collect
0
Robert Drummond 2018-10-25

It’s been painful, the silence of Silicon Valley with regards to Saudi Arabia, whose shifting accounts about the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi have nearly veered into slapstick.

He freely walked out the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Actually, rogue killers got to him.

We did set out to brutally murder him, just as Turkish officials said at the outset.

It isn’t hard to understand why the story of Khashoggi’s final moments has finally come full circle.

In fairness, breaking up with Saudi Arabia, which has drenched the Bay Area in capital, is easier said than done.

collect
0
John Applebaum 2018-10-16
img

Google became the latest name in a long list of high-profile companies to drop out of an investment conference in Saudi Arabia late last night, amid building criticism of the state's handling of a missing journalist.

A well-known critic of Saudi Arabia's policies, US resident and Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on 2 October.

Turkish sources have suggested that Khashoggi was killed inside the building.

Google Cloud chief executive Diane Greene will no longer be attending the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh next week, the company said in a statement provided to Reuters.

No reason was given for the change in decision.

Greene's withdrawal follows a number of business leaders pulling out of the conference, including the bosses of JP Morgan, Ford, Blackstone and Blackrock.

collect
0
James Manzo 2019-11-11
img

How about the collision of an experimental car with a woman walking across a street?

During an interview aired on Sunday, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said he believed both were mistakes.

The interview, filmed with journalists Mike Allen and Dan Primack for the program Axios on HBO, touched on the company’s relationship to its fifth largest shareholder, the Saudi Arabia sovereign wealth fund.

“That government said that they made a mistake,” Khosrowshahi said of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, in a response to a question about Uber’s continued relationship with Saudi Arabia.

(Last year, the Washington Post columnist disappeared into the Saudi Arabian embassy in Turkey; a few months later, the CIA concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman himself had ordered the journalist’s assassination.)

“We've made mistakes, too, with self-driving, and we stopped driving and we're recovering from that mistake.

Marie Haines 2021-07-19
img

A string of reports from a new consortium called the Pegasus Project is shedding light on how an invasive piece of spyware has been used to target journalists and activists around the world. As the investigation aims to throw light on significant events cased by the spyware,here’s a rundown of what these initial reports have revealed so far. What is Pegasus? Pegasus is a type of spyware developed by Israel-based NSO Group. It could reside on your phone and track all your activities. Pegasus entered the limelight in 2019, when it allegedly exploited a bug in WhatsApp to gain access to hundreds of…

This story continues at The Next Web
Marie Haines 2018-12-12
img

British ministers have approved the export of more than £2.4m worth of telecoms snooping gear to Saudi Arabia, in spite of its very obvious human rights problems, according to a report.

Five licences were granted to send "telecommunications interception equipment" to the controversial kingdom, which was most recently in the news over the murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside its embassy in Istanbul.

The deal was brought to light by Freedom of Information requests from political news website Politics Home.

This year, the site reported, ministers from the Department of International Trade signed off three permanent contracts worth £2.4m for the export of interception kit.

International Trade Secretary Liam Fox is a former Defence Secretary, while Saudi Arabia remains one of the top destinations for British-made military kit such as fighter jets.

It appears that that also includes British-designed equipment whose primary purpose is internal surveillance.

Calvin Muchow 2018-10-15
img

Microsoft wants its tech to be used for good, not evil, the company's CEO said.

Satya Nadella, speaking Monday at the Wired25 conference in San Francisco, noted that the tech industry has a responsibility for how its technology is used.

"We start from saying, look we want to take tech and empower the world with it," Nadella said.

Big tech has been facing questions lately about who it does business with.

Employees at companies like Google have protested the use of its technology -- from cloud computing to artificial intelligence -- by the Defense Department.

Saudi Arabia has been building relationships in the technology industry, particularly through its partnership with Japanese telecom giant SoftBank.

Alfred Borrow 2019-02-18

The Japanese conglomerate SoftBank and Mubadala, the Abu Dhabi state investment company, have a closely intertwined relationship, and it’s one that the two are further cementing.

According to the Financial Times, SoftBank has just committed half the capital for a new $400 million fund from Mubadala that aims to back European startups.

Soon after, Mubadala opened a San Francisco office, as well as structured a $400 million fund designed to invest in early-stage startups to which SoftBank committed some capital.

The pact was understandable, including because Mubadala’s early-stage fund could theoretically provide SoftBank with a better idea of what’s happening at companies that are earlier in their trajectories than SoftBank typically sees.

The move was also meant to better enable Mubadala to oversee the money it committed to SoftBank.

The newer fund appears to be raising questions, however.

Warren Edwards 2018-10-22
img

Twitter fired an engineer in 2015 after intelligence officials alerted the company to the fact that he might be a mole working for Saudi Arabia, The New York Times reports.

Ali Alzabarah was reportedly hired in 2013 and subsequently groomed by Saudi intelligence operatives to spy on dissident accounts.

Twitter could not find evidence that Alzabarah sent user data to the Saudi government, but fired him in December 2015.

Twitter fired an engineer after the company was tipped off by intelligence officials that he may have been groomed by the Saudi government, The New York Times reports.

In a report which claimed that a troll army working for Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman harassed dissidents like murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the Times said Twitter was told about a potential mole on its books at the end of 2015.

Ali Alzabarah joined Twitter in 2013 and rose to an engineering post that gave him access to user details such as phone numbers and IP addresses, the Times reports.

James Bice 2018-11-04

Throughout October, it seemed that among others in tech, SoftBank might be forced to rethink its cozy relationship with Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, or MBS, who has charmed many captains of industry since rising to power, but whose dark side came into abrupt view over the murder and gruesome disposal of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

(MBS has steered Saudi Arabia into plenty of other terribleness, but the brutal end of Khashoggi, a resident of Virginia, a Washington Post columnist, and a critic of MBS, managed to capture the West’s attention in a way that tens of thousands of dead Yemeni children have not.)

Certainly, parting ways with MBS wouldn’t be easy for SoftBank, whose CEO, Masayoshi Son, has said that his ambitious Vision Fund, which finally closed this past May with $100 billion in commitments, is anchored by MBS.

In fact, Son has said that MBS committed $45 billion to the effort in 45 minutes time, and MBS more recently revealed his intention to give SoftBank a separate $45 billion for a second Vision Fund.

That’s a lot of money to turn down.

Still, for a minute, it seemed that SoftBank might legitimately be having second thoughts about whether it’s good to be in business with MBS.

Robert Drummond 2018-10-25

It’s been painful, the silence of Silicon Valley with regards to Saudi Arabia, whose shifting accounts about the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi have nearly veered into slapstick.

He freely walked out the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Actually, rogue killers got to him.

We did set out to brutally murder him, just as Turkish officials said at the outset.

It isn’t hard to understand why the story of Khashoggi’s final moments has finally come full circle.

In fairness, breaking up with Saudi Arabia, which has drenched the Bay Area in capital, is easier said than done.

William Ly 2018-10-20
img

Surveillance footage published by Turkish newspaper Hurriyet purports to show Jamal Khashoggi entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2.CCTV/Hurriyet via AP

Twitter has suspended hundreds of bot accounts identified by NBC News as being involved in a coordinated campaign to defend the Saudi government's role in the disappearance of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

Twitter told Business Insider it had already been aware of the bot accounts, which it said behaved like spam accounts.

Twitter said it could not definitively link the accounts to the Saudi government.

Twitter is suspending hundreds of bot accounts involved in a coordinated effort to flood the service with political messages about the suspected murder of a prominent Saudi dissident.

The accounts have unleashed a barrage of messages in recent days that support the Saudi government's account in its role in the disappearance of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, according to NBC News which reported about the situation on Thursday.

Charles Rodriguez 2018-10-15
img

People protest the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Security and technical commentators have cast doubt on reports from the Turkish media that journalist Jamal Khashoggi's "torture and death" inside the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul was captured by his Apple watch and sent to his iPhone.

Khashoggi is a Saudi Arabian journalist writing for the Washington Post, and he has been missing since 2 October when he was last seen walking into his home country's embassy in Turkey.

According to media reports, Turkish officials say they have evidence of Kashoggi's murder inside the embassy, and that the journalist actually recorded what happened to him on his Apple Watch.

Some have speculated that it's more likely the reports are a cover story, and the Turkish government had other means of obtaining information about Khashoggi.

Technology and security experts are disputing the reports from Turkish press, reportedly seeded by Turkish officials, that journalist Jamal Khashoggi's Apple watch captured audio of him being tortured and killed inside the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul.

Porter Johnson 2021-03-23
img
A top Saudi official reportedly threatened to have the UN's Khashoggi investigator "taken care of" during a January 2020 meeting in Geneva.
Stuart Smith 2020-09-08
img
Trump's foreign policy and boosting of arms sales has helped exacerbate conflicts like the devastating war in Yemen.
Charles Michels 2018-10-11
img

Police investigating the missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi are searching for his Apple Watch to obtain his health and location data before his disappearance.

But that may prove impossible, according to new details learned by TechCrunch.

His soon-to-be wife was waiting outside the consulate with Khashoggi’s iPhone.

Khashoggi never emerged from the consulate, sparking a manhunt.

The Washington Post reports that U.S. intercepts showed efforts by the Saudi crown prince Mohammad bin Salman to lure the reporter back to the kingdom and detain him.

The Saudi kingdom has denied any involvement with his disappearance.

Linda Schilk 2018-10-19

Twitter botnets are having to adapt their behavior in the wake of the platform’s crackdown.

NBC News reports that on Thursday the platform suspended hundreds of accounts acting in a network to tweet messages of support for Saudi Arabia in the wake of the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Experts quoted in the report said that the bots operated in a way that allowed them to “fly under the radar” to avoid Twitter’s bans.

Turkish investigators have claimed that Khashoggi was killed by Saudi agents associated with the Saudi prince Mohammad Bin Salman during a visit to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

The Saudi government vehemently denies these allegations, and it’s this version of events that the botnet was amplifying.

Twitter has now suspended the bots brought to light by NBC News, as well as other pro-Saudi government accounts, although it hasn’t officially said who’s behind them.

Matthew Hansen 2021-07-23
Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Throughout the past week, we’ve seen story after story about a company called NSO Group, and a piece of spyware called Pegasus. Some of the stories have been shocking, with allegations that fully updated smartphones can be hacked with a single text message, and reports that two women close to murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi were among those targeted by a government agency using the spy tool.

A coalition of news outlets, including The Washington Post, Le Monde, and The Guardian is behind the reporting, and they’re calling it the Pegasus Project. The project was led by Forbidden Stories, an organization of journalists that works on stories after the original reporters have been silenced in some way. Amnesty International ran detailed...

Continue reading…

John Applebaum 2018-10-16
img

Google became the latest name in a long list of high-profile companies to drop out of an investment conference in Saudi Arabia late last night, amid building criticism of the state's handling of a missing journalist.

A well-known critic of Saudi Arabia's policies, US resident and Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on 2 October.

Turkish sources have suggested that Khashoggi was killed inside the building.

Google Cloud chief executive Diane Greene will no longer be attending the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh next week, the company said in a statement provided to Reuters.

No reason was given for the change in decision.

Greene's withdrawal follows a number of business leaders pulling out of the conference, including the bosses of JP Morgan, Ford, Blackstone and Blackrock.