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Mark Alexander 2017-05-21
img

p Six days after the 9/11 attacks, in 2001, President George W. Bush to the Islamic Center in Washington to dampen fears of a clash of civilizations between the Islamic world and the West.

“The face of terror is not the true face of Islam,” he said.

“Islam is peace.” Three days later, at a joint session of Congress, Bush defined the challenge from Al Qaeda in political rather than religious or cultural terms.

This will be an age of liberty here and across the world.” A central theme of Bush’s Presidency was fostering democracy through nation-building.

At the Presidential last October, in Las Vegas, he was particularly critical of Saudi Arabia.

“These are people that kill women and treat women horribly, and yet you take their money.” He continued the theme in his first days in office, with an executive order that banned travel from seven countries (later downgraded to six) with predominantly Muslim populations.

collect
0
Debra Simonds 2017-03-20
img

French advertising giant Havas "paused" its UK ad spend with YouTube on Friday, reportedly £35m a year, and the Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds and HSBC followed suit at the weekend.

The Cabinet Office halted its YouTube spending last week.

The Metropolitan Police and The Guardian had also inadvertently been helping to fund the video producers.

Havas becomes the first of the global marketing groups to pull all its UK ad spend from Google/YT.

— Mark Sweney (@marksweney) March 17, 2017

To be clear, @Havas_MGUK has 'paused' only YT & GDN activity & is working closely with Google to find a solution before un-pausing ad spend.

collect
0
James Howard 2018-05-02
img

I don’t regret joining the EDL.

It’s a bad group: it’s divisive, bitter, selfish, sometimes even boring.

My hometown is Lowestoft, in Suffolk.

That’s probably still true today.

I lived on a council estate and left school at 16 to work long hours in a chicken factory.

A bit after my two kids were born I had a nervous breakdown and ended up in hospital.

collect
0
Robert Tuohy 2017-07-31
img

As part of the Research for Civil Security 2012-2017 framework program of the German Federal Government, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is providing EUR 2.7 million to the junior research group on "Jihadism on the Internet" at the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU).

The project was initiated by Professor Matthias Krings of the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at Mainz University.

It brings together six young academics and researchers from the fields of Anthropology, Islamic Studies, and Film and Media Studies.

Group leader Dr. Christoph Günter is a junior researcher with extensive knowledge of the visual culture of jihadist movements.

Together with two other researchers and three doctoral candidates, the group is working on the analysis of jihadist images and videos.

They are also examining how this material proliferates online and how various audience groups react.

collect
0
Christopher Johnson 2018-05-17
img

Facebook announced this week that algorithms catch 99.5 percent of the terrorism-related content it deletes before a single user reports it.

But promising as those developments may be, a new report by the internet safety nonprofit Digital Citizens Alliance demonstrates how easy it still is to find grisly images of dead bodies, calls to jihad, and ISIS and Al Qaeda imagery on both Facebook and Instagram.

Working with researchers at the Global Intellectual Property Enforcement Center, or GIPEC, the Digital Citizens Alliance amassed a trove of evidence documenting terrorist activity on these online platforms.

On Instagram and Facebook, they found users sharing copious images of ISIS soldiers posing with the black flag.

In many cases, the most hideous photos contained captions with innocuous hashtags in Arabic, including Dads, Girls, and Cooking.

On Facebook, the researchers spotted public posts inciting people to violence.

collect
0
Richard Skaggs 2016-12-26
img

Twitter has suspended the account of Jordanian preacher and al-Qaida spiritual leader, Abu Qatada, along with two other influential scholars aligned with the extremist group.

The three accounts, which between them had tens of thousands of followers and were used several times a day, were at the heart of an online network of al-Qaida supporters, said Cole Bunzel, scholar of jihadism at Princeton University.

After years tolerating them, @twitter finally suspends accounts of 3 leading al-Qaida-aligned scholars, al-Maqdisi, Abu Qatada & al-Siba'i pic.twitter.com/3QPvU6Jiya

The accounts focused mostly on the war in Syria, frequently attacking Islamic State, but also commented on other issues, from law to religious judgments.

Abu Muhammad al- Maqdisi s and Abu Qatada s commentary has mostly been limited to the war in Syria.

Twitter has cracked down heavily on Isis supporters, shiftng them towards alternative messaging services including Telegram, but al-Qaida supporters have not been so heavily targeted.

collect
0
Gary Meyer 2017-06-15
img

Facebook is now using artificial intelligence (AI), and building a team of security experts, as well as increasing cooperation with third parties to help prevent militant groups from using the social network to communicate between themselves and with the outside world.

In a blog post entitled, “Hard Questions: How We Counter Terrorism”, published today (June 15), Facebook claimed it was experimenting with AI to become “better at identifying potential terrorist content”, growing its team of security experts, plus “strengthening partnerships with other companies, governments and NGOs in this effort".

The post, attributed to Facebook’s Monika Bickert, director of global policy management, and Brian Fisherman, counterterrorism policy manager, explains how the social network’s team of security experts is using AI, including image recognition and semantic classification software, to identify content supporting paramilitary groups.

“We remove terrorists and posts that support terrorism whenever we become aware of them.

Although academic research finds that the radicalization of members of groups like ISIS and Al Qaeda primarily occurs offline, we know that the internet does play a role — and we don't want Facebook to be used for any terrorist activity whatsoever.”

It claims the use of AI, albeit a recent development in its efforts, is already paying dividends with the move an indication of its wider efforts to improve its efficiency when it comes to censoring such material, according to the pair.

collect
0
Stephen Martinez 2017-10-03
img

Repeatedly viewing terrorist material online will result in 15 years behind bars under new anti-radicalisation proposals put forward by UK home secretary Amber Rudd.

The maximum sentence would also apply to those who publish sensitive information about the British military, police or intelligence services for terrorist-related planning.

"I want to make sure those who view despicable terrorist content online, including jihadi websites, far-right propaganda and bomb-making instructions, face the full force of the law," Rudd told Conservative Party conference attendees on Monday (2 October).

The home secretary is expected to officially announce her plan this week during the annual political gathering, which is set to run until Wednesday (4 October).

The updated law, Rudd explained, will apply to fanatics found to be repeatedly hunting out the illicit material, to help ensure it only targets the right suspects.

Currently, the law covers material that has been downloaded on a computer, saved to a physical hard drive or printed out – but does not extend to streaming.

collect
0
Manuel Scarborough 2016-05-18
img

A jihadist propaganda website run by a known Islamist extremist accused of backing the 2009 Jakarta suicide bombings has been found to have been selling advertising space to global companies and brands and making thousands of dollars in profits.

The website, which features pictures of beheadings, appears to have been using Google's ad platform to sell and show ads from international companies, including IBM, Microsoft and Citigroup.

However, Google as well as the advertisers appear to have inadvertently played a part in helping the jihadist website make money off them.

Commenting on Rahman's role as an extremist, Rohan Gunaratna, the head of the International Centre for Political Violence and Terrorism Research at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, said: "He is the most important online terrorist in Southeast Asia.

Google said: "This site violates our terms so we've taken action to terminate the account and reimburse affected advertisers.

In 2010, Rahman was sentenced to serve five years in an Indonesian jail for concealing information related to the terrorist attacks at the Ritz Carlton and JW Marriott in Jakarta, which left people killed and 50 more injured.

collect
0
Eddie Cox 2018-03-29
img

ISIS has long taken full advantage of secure communication tools, and utilized mainstream communication platforms in unexpected ways.

Extremist groups even develop their own software at times to tailor things like encrypted messaging to their specific needs.

One such project is the clandestine, unfortunately named communication tool MuslimCrypt, which uses an encryption technique called steganography to spread secret messages.

And while many of these homegrown tools don't live up to their promised protections, a new evaluation of MusilmCrypt by the Middle East Media Research Institute reaches a basic, but crucial conclusion: MuslimCrypt's steganography works.

MuslimCrypt was first released by unknown actors on January 20 in a private, pro-ISIS Telegram channel, and like other steganographic tools, it hides information in plain site.

MuslimCrypt doesn't come with a manual or provenance, so MEMRI researcher Marwan Khayat worked to trace the tool's history on Telegram, look into the users who talked about and posted it, vetted the tool in an attempt to confirm that downloading it wouldn't be dangerous, and then examined it in a software sandbox to determine how to use the tool.

collect
0
George Comer 2021-04-13
img
Sahayb Abu

A jihadi dubbed the “masked menace” has been jailed for at least 19 years for plotting a terror attack during the coronavirus lockdown.

Sahayb Abu, 27, bought an 18-inch sword, a knife, balaclavas and body armour online as he prepared to strike last summer.

He was arrested on July 9 after discussing guns with an undercover police officer, who he met on a Telegram chat group for supporters of the so-called Islamic State (IS) group.

A jury found Abu guilty of plotting terrorist acts after deliberating for more than 21 hours.

On Tuesday, Abu, of Dagenham, east London, was jailed for life with a minimum term of 19 years at the Old Bailey.

His brother Muhamed Abu, 32, of Norwood, south London, was cleared of failing to tell authorities about the plot.

collect
0
Larry Armitage 2016-12-26

Islamic State Isis and its supporters' use of encrypted messaging app Telegram has reportedly reached record highs, eclipsing the terror group's use of other social media platforms, including Twitter.

In the weeks leading up to Christmas, before the tragic Berlin attack, that saw a truck ram into a crowded Christmas market on 19 December, one of IS' known Telegram channels shared messages, calling for volunteers for a holiday killing spree, according to reports.

"Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Years Day is very soon," the message posted on 6 December read, the Washington Post reported.

"So let's prepare a gift for the filthy pigs/apes."

On Friday 23 December , Isis released a video, which showed chief suspect Anis Amri, who was killed in a shootout in Milan, pledge his allegiance to the terror group.

According to experts, Telegram has now become the top preferred communication platform for the extremist group, partly due to the tech firm's failure in implementing more aggressive measures, now commonly used by its competitors.

collect
0
Ralph Knotts 2017-02-16

High profile brans inadvertently advertise on extremist websites

Where does adtech go from here?

It's a major problem for the automated adtech industry, if high profile brands such as Mercedes-Benz, Honda, and Sandals Resorts are inadvertently advertising on jihadist and other extremist group's websites.

Ads for such companies have also appeared as pre-roll or a banner for videos produced by jihadist and other extremist groups on YouTube.

This is just another example of problems in controlling as placement.

In December 2016, the adtech industry was under scrutiny for ads placed on politically controversial websites like Breitbart.

collect
0
Angel Collins 2016-05-19
img

Image caption Nearly all French regional education authorities got involved in the competition

France's external intelligence service, the DGSE, has sponsored a school competition to find the nation's most talented young code-breakers.

It has 6,200 staff - 63% of them civilians - and an annual budget of about €750m £575m; $839m .

The DGSE's role was to provide some help and funding for it, its spokesman told the BBC.

The official declined to be named.

The organisers said boys and girls competed in almost equal numbers.

In recent years British spy agency GCHQ has also set cryptographic challenges for the general public on the internet.

collect
0
James Honor 2016-07-23
img

There s a big push among ISIS members to enhance technical knowledge, specifically of software that could be used to counteract surveillance.

According to a new report released Friday, discussion among jihadist forums proliferates the circulation of manuals and tutorials on how to use VPNs, proxy services, and other tools, and keeps up to date on the latest in software.

The report, released by Flashpoint, a cybersecurity firm that specializes in the Deep & Dark Web, states that since 2012, the knowledge among the these terrorists has become more sophisticated.

These actors have demonstrated more than just an interest in the subject; their sophisticated grasp of these complex technologies has shown their capacity for learning, adapting, and pivoting in the face of increased scrutiny, the report stated.

Members of ISIS have been browsers such as Tor and Opera to surf the Internet without risking surveillance and prefer using Android operating systems.

However, according to Defense One, which also reported on the release, the NSA has been monitoring Tor traffic, so it s probably not the best source for anonymous browsing.

collect
0
Jermaine Dusenbery 2016-12-29
img

Google s advanced search features lead users to Alwaki s propaganda and hate-filled lectures, which are believed to have inspired many jihadi bombers and radicalise extremistsReuters

Google is reportedly refusing to prevent its enhanced search features from helping users search for and access content uploaded by Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, known as the pied piper of jihad.

Awlaki, a US and Yemeni imam, who has previously been implicated in the planning of several al-Qaeda attacks, allegedly posted numerous online recordings such as lectures, which can easily be accessed by users by typing a few words on Google search, according to a report.

When searching for Awlaki, Google's autocomplete feature suggests additional search options such as "quotes" and "lectures".

Although Awlaki was killed in 2011 in a US drone strike, his propaganda and hate-filled lectures appear to be still of interest by those who continue to be seek them online.

The search results provided by Google's advanced features lead users to various transcripts and recordings of Awlaki's propaganda and lectures, which are believed to have inspired many jihadi bombers and radicalise other extremists, The Times reported.

collect
0
Mark Alexander 2017-05-21
img

p Six days after the 9/11 attacks, in 2001, President George W. Bush to the Islamic Center in Washington to dampen fears of a clash of civilizations between the Islamic world and the West.

“The face of terror is not the true face of Islam,” he said.

“Islam is peace.” Three days later, at a joint session of Congress, Bush defined the challenge from Al Qaeda in political rather than religious or cultural terms.

This will be an age of liberty here and across the world.” A central theme of Bush’s Presidency was fostering democracy through nation-building.

At the Presidential last October, in Las Vegas, he was particularly critical of Saudi Arabia.

“These are people that kill women and treat women horribly, and yet you take their money.” He continued the theme in his first days in office, with an executive order that banned travel from seven countries (later downgraded to six) with predominantly Muslim populations.

James Howard 2018-05-02
img

I don’t regret joining the EDL.

It’s a bad group: it’s divisive, bitter, selfish, sometimes even boring.

My hometown is Lowestoft, in Suffolk.

That’s probably still true today.

I lived on a council estate and left school at 16 to work long hours in a chicken factory.

A bit after my two kids were born I had a nervous breakdown and ended up in hospital.

Christopher Johnson 2018-05-17
img

Facebook announced this week that algorithms catch 99.5 percent of the terrorism-related content it deletes before a single user reports it.

But promising as those developments may be, a new report by the internet safety nonprofit Digital Citizens Alliance demonstrates how easy it still is to find grisly images of dead bodies, calls to jihad, and ISIS and Al Qaeda imagery on both Facebook and Instagram.

Working with researchers at the Global Intellectual Property Enforcement Center, or GIPEC, the Digital Citizens Alliance amassed a trove of evidence documenting terrorist activity on these online platforms.

On Instagram and Facebook, they found users sharing copious images of ISIS soldiers posing with the black flag.

In many cases, the most hideous photos contained captions with innocuous hashtags in Arabic, including Dads, Girls, and Cooking.

On Facebook, the researchers spotted public posts inciting people to violence.

Gary Meyer 2017-06-15
img

Facebook is now using artificial intelligence (AI), and building a team of security experts, as well as increasing cooperation with third parties to help prevent militant groups from using the social network to communicate between themselves and with the outside world.

In a blog post entitled, “Hard Questions: How We Counter Terrorism”, published today (June 15), Facebook claimed it was experimenting with AI to become “better at identifying potential terrorist content”, growing its team of security experts, plus “strengthening partnerships with other companies, governments and NGOs in this effort".

The post, attributed to Facebook’s Monika Bickert, director of global policy management, and Brian Fisherman, counterterrorism policy manager, explains how the social network’s team of security experts is using AI, including image recognition and semantic classification software, to identify content supporting paramilitary groups.

“We remove terrorists and posts that support terrorism whenever we become aware of them.

Although academic research finds that the radicalization of members of groups like ISIS and Al Qaeda primarily occurs offline, we know that the internet does play a role — and we don't want Facebook to be used for any terrorist activity whatsoever.”

It claims the use of AI, albeit a recent development in its efforts, is already paying dividends with the move an indication of its wider efforts to improve its efficiency when it comes to censoring such material, according to the pair.

Manuel Scarborough 2016-05-18
img

A jihadist propaganda website run by a known Islamist extremist accused of backing the 2009 Jakarta suicide bombings has been found to have been selling advertising space to global companies and brands and making thousands of dollars in profits.

The website, which features pictures of beheadings, appears to have been using Google's ad platform to sell and show ads from international companies, including IBM, Microsoft and Citigroup.

However, Google as well as the advertisers appear to have inadvertently played a part in helping the jihadist website make money off them.

Commenting on Rahman's role as an extremist, Rohan Gunaratna, the head of the International Centre for Political Violence and Terrorism Research at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, said: "He is the most important online terrorist in Southeast Asia.

Google said: "This site violates our terms so we've taken action to terminate the account and reimburse affected advertisers.

In 2010, Rahman was sentenced to serve five years in an Indonesian jail for concealing information related to the terrorist attacks at the Ritz Carlton and JW Marriott in Jakarta, which left people killed and 50 more injured.

George Comer 2021-04-13
img
Sahayb Abu

A jihadi dubbed the “masked menace” has been jailed for at least 19 years for plotting a terror attack during the coronavirus lockdown.

Sahayb Abu, 27, bought an 18-inch sword, a knife, balaclavas and body armour online as he prepared to strike last summer.

He was arrested on July 9 after discussing guns with an undercover police officer, who he met on a Telegram chat group for supporters of the so-called Islamic State (IS) group.

A jury found Abu guilty of plotting terrorist acts after deliberating for more than 21 hours.

On Tuesday, Abu, of Dagenham, east London, was jailed for life with a minimum term of 19 years at the Old Bailey.

His brother Muhamed Abu, 32, of Norwood, south London, was cleared of failing to tell authorities about the plot.

Ralph Knotts 2017-02-16

High profile brans inadvertently advertise on extremist websites

Where does adtech go from here?

It's a major problem for the automated adtech industry, if high profile brands such as Mercedes-Benz, Honda, and Sandals Resorts are inadvertently advertising on jihadist and other extremist group's websites.

Ads for such companies have also appeared as pre-roll or a banner for videos produced by jihadist and other extremist groups on YouTube.

This is just another example of problems in controlling as placement.

In December 2016, the adtech industry was under scrutiny for ads placed on politically controversial websites like Breitbart.

James Honor 2016-07-23
img

There s a big push among ISIS members to enhance technical knowledge, specifically of software that could be used to counteract surveillance.

According to a new report released Friday, discussion among jihadist forums proliferates the circulation of manuals and tutorials on how to use VPNs, proxy services, and other tools, and keeps up to date on the latest in software.

The report, released by Flashpoint, a cybersecurity firm that specializes in the Deep & Dark Web, states that since 2012, the knowledge among the these terrorists has become more sophisticated.

These actors have demonstrated more than just an interest in the subject; their sophisticated grasp of these complex technologies has shown their capacity for learning, adapting, and pivoting in the face of increased scrutiny, the report stated.

Members of ISIS have been browsers such as Tor and Opera to surf the Internet without risking surveillance and prefer using Android operating systems.

However, according to Defense One, which also reported on the release, the NSA has been monitoring Tor traffic, so it s probably not the best source for anonymous browsing.

Debra Simonds 2017-03-20
img

French advertising giant Havas "paused" its UK ad spend with YouTube on Friday, reportedly £35m a year, and the Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds and HSBC followed suit at the weekend.

The Cabinet Office halted its YouTube spending last week.

The Metropolitan Police and The Guardian had also inadvertently been helping to fund the video producers.

Havas becomes the first of the global marketing groups to pull all its UK ad spend from Google/YT.

— Mark Sweney (@marksweney) March 17, 2017

To be clear, @Havas_MGUK has 'paused' only YT & GDN activity & is working closely with Google to find a solution before un-pausing ad spend.

Robert Tuohy 2017-07-31
img

As part of the Research for Civil Security 2012-2017 framework program of the German Federal Government, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is providing EUR 2.7 million to the junior research group on "Jihadism on the Internet" at the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU).

The project was initiated by Professor Matthias Krings of the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at Mainz University.

It brings together six young academics and researchers from the fields of Anthropology, Islamic Studies, and Film and Media Studies.

Group leader Dr. Christoph Günter is a junior researcher with extensive knowledge of the visual culture of jihadist movements.

Together with two other researchers and three doctoral candidates, the group is working on the analysis of jihadist images and videos.

They are also examining how this material proliferates online and how various audience groups react.

Richard Skaggs 2016-12-26
img

Twitter has suspended the account of Jordanian preacher and al-Qaida spiritual leader, Abu Qatada, along with two other influential scholars aligned with the extremist group.

The three accounts, which between them had tens of thousands of followers and were used several times a day, were at the heart of an online network of al-Qaida supporters, said Cole Bunzel, scholar of jihadism at Princeton University.

After years tolerating them, @twitter finally suspends accounts of 3 leading al-Qaida-aligned scholars, al-Maqdisi, Abu Qatada & al-Siba'i pic.twitter.com/3QPvU6Jiya

The accounts focused mostly on the war in Syria, frequently attacking Islamic State, but also commented on other issues, from law to religious judgments.

Abu Muhammad al- Maqdisi s and Abu Qatada s commentary has mostly been limited to the war in Syria.

Twitter has cracked down heavily on Isis supporters, shiftng them towards alternative messaging services including Telegram, but al-Qaida supporters have not been so heavily targeted.

Stephen Martinez 2017-10-03
img

Repeatedly viewing terrorist material online will result in 15 years behind bars under new anti-radicalisation proposals put forward by UK home secretary Amber Rudd.

The maximum sentence would also apply to those who publish sensitive information about the British military, police or intelligence services for terrorist-related planning.

"I want to make sure those who view despicable terrorist content online, including jihadi websites, far-right propaganda and bomb-making instructions, face the full force of the law," Rudd told Conservative Party conference attendees on Monday (2 October).

The home secretary is expected to officially announce her plan this week during the annual political gathering, which is set to run until Wednesday (4 October).

The updated law, Rudd explained, will apply to fanatics found to be repeatedly hunting out the illicit material, to help ensure it only targets the right suspects.

Currently, the law covers material that has been downloaded on a computer, saved to a physical hard drive or printed out – but does not extend to streaming.

Eddie Cox 2018-03-29
img

ISIS has long taken full advantage of secure communication tools, and utilized mainstream communication platforms in unexpected ways.

Extremist groups even develop their own software at times to tailor things like encrypted messaging to their specific needs.

One such project is the clandestine, unfortunately named communication tool MuslimCrypt, which uses an encryption technique called steganography to spread secret messages.

And while many of these homegrown tools don't live up to their promised protections, a new evaluation of MusilmCrypt by the Middle East Media Research Institute reaches a basic, but crucial conclusion: MuslimCrypt's steganography works.

MuslimCrypt was first released by unknown actors on January 20 in a private, pro-ISIS Telegram channel, and like other steganographic tools, it hides information in plain site.

MuslimCrypt doesn't come with a manual or provenance, so MEMRI researcher Marwan Khayat worked to trace the tool's history on Telegram, look into the users who talked about and posted it, vetted the tool in an attempt to confirm that downloading it wouldn't be dangerous, and then examined it in a software sandbox to determine how to use the tool.

Larry Armitage 2016-12-26

Islamic State Isis and its supporters' use of encrypted messaging app Telegram has reportedly reached record highs, eclipsing the terror group's use of other social media platforms, including Twitter.

In the weeks leading up to Christmas, before the tragic Berlin attack, that saw a truck ram into a crowded Christmas market on 19 December, one of IS' known Telegram channels shared messages, calling for volunteers for a holiday killing spree, according to reports.

"Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Years Day is very soon," the message posted on 6 December read, the Washington Post reported.

"So let's prepare a gift for the filthy pigs/apes."

On Friday 23 December , Isis released a video, which showed chief suspect Anis Amri, who was killed in a shootout in Milan, pledge his allegiance to the terror group.

According to experts, Telegram has now become the top preferred communication platform for the extremist group, partly due to the tech firm's failure in implementing more aggressive measures, now commonly used by its competitors.

Angel Collins 2016-05-19
img

Image caption Nearly all French regional education authorities got involved in the competition

France's external intelligence service, the DGSE, has sponsored a school competition to find the nation's most talented young code-breakers.

It has 6,200 staff - 63% of them civilians - and an annual budget of about €750m £575m; $839m .

The DGSE's role was to provide some help and funding for it, its spokesman told the BBC.

The official declined to be named.

The organisers said boys and girls competed in almost equal numbers.

In recent years British spy agency GCHQ has also set cryptographic challenges for the general public on the internet.

Jermaine Dusenbery 2016-12-29
img

Google s advanced search features lead users to Alwaki s propaganda and hate-filled lectures, which are believed to have inspired many jihadi bombers and radicalise extremistsReuters

Google is reportedly refusing to prevent its enhanced search features from helping users search for and access content uploaded by Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, known as the pied piper of jihad.

Awlaki, a US and Yemeni imam, who has previously been implicated in the planning of several al-Qaeda attacks, allegedly posted numerous online recordings such as lectures, which can easily be accessed by users by typing a few words on Google search, according to a report.

When searching for Awlaki, Google's autocomplete feature suggests additional search options such as "quotes" and "lectures".

Although Awlaki was killed in 2011 in a US drone strike, his propaganda and hate-filled lectures appear to be still of interest by those who continue to be seek them online.

The search results provided by Google's advanced features lead users to various transcripts and recordings of Awlaki's propaganda and lectures, which are believed to have inspired many jihadi bombers and radicalise other extremists, The Times reported.