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Jerry Miller 2018-09-19
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This time last year, the L.A. Metro system and gonzo director Mike Diva introduced us to Super Kind, a colorful superhero and pop star who fights rude behavior on mass transit.

Now she’s got a surprising ally: Danny Trejo.

The famously tough actor, star of Machete and (perhaps most famously among ad nerds) Snickers’ 2015 Super Bowl spot, takes the lead in one of the new ads from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Again directed by Diva, who built a following through surreal fake ads before creating the darkly phenomenal “Eat the Ice Cream” spot for Halo Top, the three new spots for L.A. Metro tackle more types of bad behavior on the train, including selling stuff, playing loud music and barging onboard before riders have exited.

Super Kind and her nemesis, Rude Dude, are still the stars of the show, but in one of the spots, Trejo abruptly steps in to have a word with the audience:

At more than 2 minutes long, the most epic of the new spots is essentially a music video for Super Kind’s rebuttal to everyone subway rider’s least-favorite nuisance: the music lover who can’t be bothered to use headphones.

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Eric Erikson 2018-03-09
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OK, so this weird, and not what we were expecting when Bose told us it was making a new product announcement at this year's SXSW: It's creating an augmented-reality platform.

The augmented-reality platform its announced -- and set up a $50 million venture fund to support it -- is about about audio not video.

Bose is calling it the first "audio augmented platform" and says its Bose AR prototype -- "glasses to hear" -- is the future of mobile sound.

For now the glasses won't be available to consumers, a Bose spokesperson told CNET, just to developers and manufacturers (the Bose AR SDK, and limited quantities of a refined and updated version of the Bose AR glasses, will be available this summer).

Think of it as different type of wearable headphone that's got some very smart features.

"And rather than superimposing visual objects on the real world, Bose AR adds an audible layer of information and experiences, making every day better, easier, more meaningful, and more productive."

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0
Joseph Wiles 2021-04-20
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"We had to take away from our families so that we can pay royalties to you, a multi-billionaire," franchisees wrote in a letter.
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0
Edward Hudson 2018-03-09
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That said, the idea makes a lot more sense than it might at first: These glasses don’t change what you see, but rather what you hear.

Like other AR glasses, these see what is going on around you, but instead of overlaying visual information on top of what you’re looking at, they play audio cues.

Looking at the glasses, you may wonder where the sound comes from since there are no earbuds or headphones to pair with them, but Bose says it uses a minuscule acoustics package built into the frame of the glasses to produce sound.

“Bose AR represents a new kind of augmented reality — one that’s made for anyone and every day,” Bose Consumer Electronics Division Vice President John Gordon said in a statement.

“It places audio in your surroundings, not digital images, so you can focus on the amazing world around you — rather than a tiny display.

It knows which way you’re facing, and can instantly connect that place and time with endless possibilities for travel, learning, music and more.

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0
Howard Marcinkowski 2021-04-21
img
The denial came after more than 100 Subway franchisees released an open letter to owner Elisabeth DeLuca, demanding she fix the business.
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0
James Maloch 2016-08-17
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Intel and General Electric want to make your city smarter.Every time I hear about smart cities, I think of Ubisoft s Watch Dogs video game, where a hacker runs amuck with the operating system that runs Chicago in the future.

And every time I interview tech executives about it, they tell me they ve never heard of the game, which sold more than 10 million copies.Lets hope that Intel and General Electric know how to protect us.

The two giants talked this week about how they are collaborating to make cities smarter, including projects that involve making their headquarters buildings into ultra-connected and instrumented places.

Jeff Immelt, CEO of General Electric, talked smart cities on stage about this with Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco on Tuesday.Intel estimates that each one of us will use 1.5 gigabytes of data per day by 2020.

A smart hospital will use 3,000 gigabytes a day.

We are at a line of demarcation where you embrace the future or you are unable to satisfy the needs or your customers, said Immelt.

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0
Janet Gaines 2021-05-10
img
The widow of Subway co-founder Fred DeLuca is in the spotlight as Subway sales rumors swirl and franchisees call for assistance.
collect
0
Jerry Miller 2018-09-19
img

This time last year, the L.A. Metro system and gonzo director Mike Diva introduced us to Super Kind, a colorful superhero and pop star who fights rude behavior on mass transit.

Now she’s got a surprising ally: Danny Trejo.

The famously tough actor, star of Machete and (perhaps most famously among ad nerds) Snickers’ 2015 Super Bowl spot, takes the lead in one of the new ads from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Again directed by Diva, who built a following through surreal fake ads before creating the darkly phenomenal “Eat the Ice Cream” spot for Halo Top, the three new spots for L.A. Metro tackle more types of bad behavior on the train, including selling stuff, playing loud music and barging onboard before riders have exited.

Super Kind and her nemesis, Rude Dude, are still the stars of the show, but in one of the spots, Trejo abruptly steps in to have a word with the audience:

At more than 2 minutes long, the most epic of the new spots is essentially a music video for Super Kind’s rebuttal to everyone subway rider’s least-favorite nuisance: the music lover who can’t be bothered to use headphones.

Joseph Wiles 2021-04-20
img
"We had to take away from our families so that we can pay royalties to you, a multi-billionaire," franchisees wrote in a letter.
Howard Marcinkowski 2021-04-21
img
The denial came after more than 100 Subway franchisees released an open letter to owner Elisabeth DeLuca, demanding she fix the business.
Janet Gaines 2021-05-10
img
The widow of Subway co-founder Fred DeLuca is in the spotlight as Subway sales rumors swirl and franchisees call for assistance.
Eric Erikson 2018-03-09
img

OK, so this weird, and not what we were expecting when Bose told us it was making a new product announcement at this year's SXSW: It's creating an augmented-reality platform.

The augmented-reality platform its announced -- and set up a $50 million venture fund to support it -- is about about audio not video.

Bose is calling it the first "audio augmented platform" and says its Bose AR prototype -- "glasses to hear" -- is the future of mobile sound.

For now the glasses won't be available to consumers, a Bose spokesperson told CNET, just to developers and manufacturers (the Bose AR SDK, and limited quantities of a refined and updated version of the Bose AR glasses, will be available this summer).

Think of it as different type of wearable headphone that's got some very smart features.

"And rather than superimposing visual objects on the real world, Bose AR adds an audible layer of information and experiences, making every day better, easier, more meaningful, and more productive."

Edward Hudson 2018-03-09
img

That said, the idea makes a lot more sense than it might at first: These glasses don’t change what you see, but rather what you hear.

Like other AR glasses, these see what is going on around you, but instead of overlaying visual information on top of what you’re looking at, they play audio cues.

Looking at the glasses, you may wonder where the sound comes from since there are no earbuds or headphones to pair with them, but Bose says it uses a minuscule acoustics package built into the frame of the glasses to produce sound.

“Bose AR represents a new kind of augmented reality — one that’s made for anyone and every day,” Bose Consumer Electronics Division Vice President John Gordon said in a statement.

“It places audio in your surroundings, not digital images, so you can focus on the amazing world around you — rather than a tiny display.

It knows which way you’re facing, and can instantly connect that place and time with endless possibilities for travel, learning, music and more.

James Maloch 2016-08-17
img

Intel and General Electric want to make your city smarter.Every time I hear about smart cities, I think of Ubisoft s Watch Dogs video game, where a hacker runs amuck with the operating system that runs Chicago in the future.

And every time I interview tech executives about it, they tell me they ve never heard of the game, which sold more than 10 million copies.Lets hope that Intel and General Electric know how to protect us.

The two giants talked this week about how they are collaborating to make cities smarter, including projects that involve making their headquarters buildings into ultra-connected and instrumented places.

Jeff Immelt, CEO of General Electric, talked smart cities on stage about this with Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco on Tuesday.Intel estimates that each one of us will use 1.5 gigabytes of data per day by 2020.

A smart hospital will use 3,000 gigabytes a day.

We are at a line of demarcation where you embrace the future or you are unable to satisfy the needs or your customers, said Immelt.