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Alex Blair 2016-08-09
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British police investigating a drone being flown near a prison pursued a woman in a vehicle who eventually crashed and died, according to a report in The Guardian.

At around 3am, police were called to investigate the suspicious drone and pursued a car that appeared to be fleeing from the scene.

Ten minutes later, the vehicle crashed, killing a female passenger and leaving the male driver in critical condition.

Details of the incident are sketchy.

It s so far unclear whether the man and woman were flying the drone into the prison compound in order to smuggle in contraband, or if they were operating the drone at all.

It s also not clear if the drone has been recovered.

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0
Peter Garvey 2020-07-27
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Bodycam footage of mild confrontations tearing up social media.
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0
James Bice 2018-12-22

UK police have arrested two individuals in connection with flight disruptions at London Gatwick Airport.

The pair, a 47-year-old man and a 54-year-old woman were arrested late on Friday, according to the Sussex Police.

Air traffic at Gatwick, England’s second largest airport, was disrupted when a drone was spotted flying in the area on Wednesday, prompting the airport to suspend flights through Friday.

Flights were diverted to other airports, and authorities ended up bringing in the British Army, which media reports say set up an Israeli-built drone defense system called a “Drone Dome,” designed to intercept the device’s radio signals.

Flights resumed at the airport on Friday.

Sussex Police did not identify the individuals, other than to say that they were being held on “suspicion of disrupting services of civil aviation aerodrome to endanger or likely to endanger safety of operations or persons,” and that the investigation was ongoing.

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0
Julian Dunkelberger 2018-03-21
img

The report looked at how police forces in the UK are preparing for the threat posed by cybercrime.

UK police forces have spent just over £1m on cybercrime training courses over the last three years, according to a new report by think tank Parliament Street.

The new Policing and Cybercrime policy paper examined how police forces in the UK are preparing for the growing threat posed by cybercrime.

In total, forces across the UK spend £1.3bn on police training courses, which trained almost 40,000 officers and staff.

According to the report, the highest level of spending was North Wales Police, which spent £375,488 on training for officers and staff between 2015 and 2017.

This included a dedicated five-day ‘Main Stream Cyber Training’ course for 147 key staff, totaling £160,000.

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0
Michael Morehead 2016-11-11
img

The classic British police helmet, retired from most services within the UK now, could be about to make a comeback in England, where Thames Valley police is said to be considering returning them to service so its officers stand out better when mingling with crowds of you anti capitalists.

And, reading between the lines, it seems to be all down to political correctness and the way the police force now has to let short people be policemen nowadays too.

Anthony Stansfeld commissioner Anthony Stansfeld told The Times that: "It's a daytime thing, people don't see the police very often I think.

The officers are no longer all six foot, we have brains as well as brawn these days.

I think it would be a good move but that is a personal view and we will do a consultation on it."

So tall helmets would help people see small policemen and be scared or feel safe, depending on the scenario playing out.

collect
0
Alvaro Okajima 2021-05-28
img
"It's certainly not what we were expecting," police said. "It had all the hallmarks of a cannabis cultivation set-up."
collect
0
Julie Romero 2021-05-28
img
"It's certainly not what we were expecting," police said. "It had all the hallmarks of a cannabis cultivation set-up."
collect
0
Charlie Warren 2018-05-07

How anyone can rely on something with a "92% false-positive rate" is beyond me.

collect
0
Steven Restivo 2018-03-20
img

British police spent just £1.3m on cyber training for staff in the last three years

British forces have spent a tiny amount of money over the last three years on training its staff on cybersecurity issues.

Freedom of Information requests to all the UK’s police forces were made by a think tank called Parliament Street (PS).

It found that British police had spent just £1.3m in cyber training for nearly 40,000 officers and staff over the last three years.

The PS report highlighted official data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) that has shown that that incidents involving computer misuse and malware against businesses have increased significantly in recent years.

Indeed, for a while now cybercrime offences, including online fraud, are now the UK’s most common forms of criminal activity, after they were included in official policing figures for the first time in 2015.

collect
0
Peter Garvey 2016-12-14
img

Digital technology should play an increasingly significant role to help British police tackle crime, says new report

The trade body techUK has issued a report highlighting the areas that technology can be used to aid the police in their fight against crime.

Specifically, the Digital Policing: The Future of Modern Crime Prevention report makes recommendations in order to support the Home Office s desire for the greater use of tech in policing.

It also reveals what gaps still need to be plugged and the technology areas that British police forces should be exploring.

It should be remembered that the Home Office created a private company in 2012 to handle ICT procurement for law enforcement, in an effort to help cut the cost of police technology such as telecommunications services and software licences.

But the police forces use of technology is still a hit and miss affair, despite the potential cost savings that digital tech could deliver in these tight budgetary times.

collect
0
Earl Rizvi 2018-03-09
img

Officer Alexa is reporting for duty with police in England.

Amazon's digital assistant will start working more closely with law enforcement in Lancashire, a county with a population of nearly 1.5 million in northwest England.

As first announced at the UK's College of Policing Conference in January and reported by TechSpot, the first integration is an Alexa skill that includes local crime reports in your daily briefings.

Alexa, the digital assistant popularized by smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo, features apps you access with your voice called "skills."

You can give a voice command to an Echo to control your smart home, search the web and set a timer.

The police force worked with Amazon to develop the skill, and the next step will go even further.

collect
0
John Johannes 2020-08-17
img

A British police force is set to trial a facial recognition system that infers people’s moods by analyzing CCTV footage. Lincolnshire Police will be able to use the system to search the film for certain moods and facial expressions, the London Times reports. It will also allow cops to find people wearing hats and glasses, or carrying bags and umbrellas. The force has got funding from the Home Office to test the tool in the market town of Gainsborough, but ethical concerns have delayed the pilot’s launch. A police spokesperson told the Times that all the footage will be deleted after 31…

This story continues at The Next Web
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0
Robbie Kromer 2016-11-24

Documents detailing the use of IMSI catchers by police forces have been either removed or redacted

To continue providing news and award winning journalism, we rely on advertising revenue.

To continue reading, please turn off your ad blocker or whitelist us.

The police forces refer to the records as "covert communications data capture" CCDC , from the internet.

UK police forces have, in the past, attempted to cloak their use of IMSI catchers, which were used to surreptitiously monitor civilians' phone records.

However, upon requesting further clarification, Sarah-Jane Lynch, an engagement officer with the West Mercia Police and Crime Commissioner, steered to a redacted version of the minutes, available on the Commissioner's website.

collect
0
Wayne Chapple 2019-01-28
img

Financial losses due to cyber-crime rocketed by nearly one-quarter to £34.6 million in the second half of last year, police have said.

The figures for April to September of 2018 were 24 percent higher than for the first half of the year.

More than one-third of the cyber-crimes reported to police were due to email or social media accounts having been hacked.

Action Fraud said 13,357 people in the UK reported cyber-crimes during the period.

More than 5,000 of the crimes resulted from email or social media hacks, costing targets £14.8m.

Police said email and social media were being targeted in order to gain access to individuals’ personal details, putting them at risk of identity theft.

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2018-05-06
img

During last summer’s Champion’s League Final in Cardiff, Wales, UK police began a facial recognition pilot program designed to check event-goers against a database of 500,000 images of persons of interest.

Almost a year later, The Guardian reports that the pilot yielded 2,470 potential matches, of which, 2,297 were found to be “false positives.”

In a records request (via Wired), the South Wales Police revealed that at events such as the 2017 Champion’s League Final, the Automated Facial Recognition (AFR) ‘Locate’ system flagged 2,470 people — with only 173 positive matches.

Figures from the report reveal that of the 2,685 alerts from 15 events, only 234 have been “True Positives”, with another 2,451 false positives.

But in its press release, the SWP note they’ve made 2,000 positive matches and have used that information to make 450 arrests in the past nine months.

We’ve reached out to the SWP to ask about the differences in numbers, and will update if we hear back.

collect
0
Mattie Wright 2018-11-30
img

Cisco has announced plans to help provide cybersecurity training for thousands of UK police in the latest attempt to curb the rise of online crime.

The tech giant has announced its Cisco Networking Academy will be providing specialised training and guidance to 120,000 officers across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The partnership will allow the police force to utilise Cisco's cybersecurity expertise, and build a strong and successful skill programme for officers at all levels of seniority.

The Cisco Networking Academy offers a range of specialised tech-focused programmes, with online and in-person learning options available.

“We are very pleased to be working with Cisco Networking Academy," said Andy Beet from the National Police Chiefs’ Council.

"By joining the programme, forces can access training designed to raise awareness and increase their understanding of cybercrime and cyber threats, while also gaining insights into the procedures used to defend networks."

collect
0
Alex Blair 2016-08-09
img

British police investigating a drone being flown near a prison pursued a woman in a vehicle who eventually crashed and died, according to a report in The Guardian.

At around 3am, police were called to investigate the suspicious drone and pursued a car that appeared to be fleeing from the scene.

Ten minutes later, the vehicle crashed, killing a female passenger and leaving the male driver in critical condition.

Details of the incident are sketchy.

It s so far unclear whether the man and woman were flying the drone into the prison compound in order to smuggle in contraband, or if they were operating the drone at all.

It s also not clear if the drone has been recovered.

James Bice 2018-12-22

UK police have arrested two individuals in connection with flight disruptions at London Gatwick Airport.

The pair, a 47-year-old man and a 54-year-old woman were arrested late on Friday, according to the Sussex Police.

Air traffic at Gatwick, England’s second largest airport, was disrupted when a drone was spotted flying in the area on Wednesday, prompting the airport to suspend flights through Friday.

Flights were diverted to other airports, and authorities ended up bringing in the British Army, which media reports say set up an Israeli-built drone defense system called a “Drone Dome,” designed to intercept the device’s radio signals.

Flights resumed at the airport on Friday.

Sussex Police did not identify the individuals, other than to say that they were being held on “suspicion of disrupting services of civil aviation aerodrome to endanger or likely to endanger safety of operations or persons,” and that the investigation was ongoing.

Michael Morehead 2016-11-11
img

The classic British police helmet, retired from most services within the UK now, could be about to make a comeback in England, where Thames Valley police is said to be considering returning them to service so its officers stand out better when mingling with crowds of you anti capitalists.

And, reading between the lines, it seems to be all down to political correctness and the way the police force now has to let short people be policemen nowadays too.

Anthony Stansfeld commissioner Anthony Stansfeld told The Times that: "It's a daytime thing, people don't see the police very often I think.

The officers are no longer all six foot, we have brains as well as brawn these days.

I think it would be a good move but that is a personal view and we will do a consultation on it."

So tall helmets would help people see small policemen and be scared or feel safe, depending on the scenario playing out.

Julie Romero 2021-05-28
img
"It's certainly not what we were expecting," police said. "It had all the hallmarks of a cannabis cultivation set-up."
Steven Restivo 2018-03-20
img

British police spent just £1.3m on cyber training for staff in the last three years

British forces have spent a tiny amount of money over the last three years on training its staff on cybersecurity issues.

Freedom of Information requests to all the UK’s police forces were made by a think tank called Parliament Street (PS).

It found that British police had spent just £1.3m in cyber training for nearly 40,000 officers and staff over the last three years.

The PS report highlighted official data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) that has shown that that incidents involving computer misuse and malware against businesses have increased significantly in recent years.

Indeed, for a while now cybercrime offences, including online fraud, are now the UK’s most common forms of criminal activity, after they were included in official policing figures for the first time in 2015.

Earl Rizvi 2018-03-09
img

Officer Alexa is reporting for duty with police in England.

Amazon's digital assistant will start working more closely with law enforcement in Lancashire, a county with a population of nearly 1.5 million in northwest England.

As first announced at the UK's College of Policing Conference in January and reported by TechSpot, the first integration is an Alexa skill that includes local crime reports in your daily briefings.

Alexa, the digital assistant popularized by smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo, features apps you access with your voice called "skills."

You can give a voice command to an Echo to control your smart home, search the web and set a timer.

The police force worked with Amazon to develop the skill, and the next step will go even further.

Robbie Kromer 2016-11-24

Documents detailing the use of IMSI catchers by police forces have been either removed or redacted

To continue providing news and award winning journalism, we rely on advertising revenue.

To continue reading, please turn off your ad blocker or whitelist us.

The police forces refer to the records as "covert communications data capture" CCDC , from the internet.

UK police forces have, in the past, attempted to cloak their use of IMSI catchers, which were used to surreptitiously monitor civilians' phone records.

However, upon requesting further clarification, Sarah-Jane Lynch, an engagement officer with the West Mercia Police and Crime Commissioner, steered to a redacted version of the minutes, available on the Commissioner's website.

Garland Marsella 2018-05-06
img

During last summer’s Champion’s League Final in Cardiff, Wales, UK police began a facial recognition pilot program designed to check event-goers against a database of 500,000 images of persons of interest.

Almost a year later, The Guardian reports that the pilot yielded 2,470 potential matches, of which, 2,297 were found to be “false positives.”

In a records request (via Wired), the South Wales Police revealed that at events such as the 2017 Champion’s League Final, the Automated Facial Recognition (AFR) ‘Locate’ system flagged 2,470 people — with only 173 positive matches.

Figures from the report reveal that of the 2,685 alerts from 15 events, only 234 have been “True Positives”, with another 2,451 false positives.

But in its press release, the SWP note they’ve made 2,000 positive matches and have used that information to make 450 arrests in the past nine months.

We’ve reached out to the SWP to ask about the differences in numbers, and will update if we hear back.

Peter Garvey 2020-07-27
img
Bodycam footage of mild confrontations tearing up social media.
Julian Dunkelberger 2018-03-21
img

The report looked at how police forces in the UK are preparing for the threat posed by cybercrime.

UK police forces have spent just over £1m on cybercrime training courses over the last three years, according to a new report by think tank Parliament Street.

The new Policing and Cybercrime policy paper examined how police forces in the UK are preparing for the growing threat posed by cybercrime.

In total, forces across the UK spend £1.3bn on police training courses, which trained almost 40,000 officers and staff.

According to the report, the highest level of spending was North Wales Police, which spent £375,488 on training for officers and staff between 2015 and 2017.

This included a dedicated five-day ‘Main Stream Cyber Training’ course for 147 key staff, totaling £160,000.

Alvaro Okajima 2021-05-28
img
"It's certainly not what we were expecting," police said. "It had all the hallmarks of a cannabis cultivation set-up."
Charlie Warren 2018-05-07

How anyone can rely on something with a "92% false-positive rate" is beyond me.

Peter Garvey 2016-12-14
img

Digital technology should play an increasingly significant role to help British police tackle crime, says new report

The trade body techUK has issued a report highlighting the areas that technology can be used to aid the police in their fight against crime.

Specifically, the Digital Policing: The Future of Modern Crime Prevention report makes recommendations in order to support the Home Office s desire for the greater use of tech in policing.

It also reveals what gaps still need to be plugged and the technology areas that British police forces should be exploring.

It should be remembered that the Home Office created a private company in 2012 to handle ICT procurement for law enforcement, in an effort to help cut the cost of police technology such as telecommunications services and software licences.

But the police forces use of technology is still a hit and miss affair, despite the potential cost savings that digital tech could deliver in these tight budgetary times.

John Johannes 2020-08-17
img

A British police force is set to trial a facial recognition system that infers people’s moods by analyzing CCTV footage. Lincolnshire Police will be able to use the system to search the film for certain moods and facial expressions, the London Times reports. It will also allow cops to find people wearing hats and glasses, or carrying bags and umbrellas. The force has got funding from the Home Office to test the tool in the market town of Gainsborough, but ethical concerns have delayed the pilot’s launch. A police spokesperson told the Times that all the footage will be deleted after 31…

This story continues at The Next Web
Wayne Chapple 2019-01-28
img

Financial losses due to cyber-crime rocketed by nearly one-quarter to £34.6 million in the second half of last year, police have said.

The figures for April to September of 2018 were 24 percent higher than for the first half of the year.

More than one-third of the cyber-crimes reported to police were due to email or social media accounts having been hacked.

Action Fraud said 13,357 people in the UK reported cyber-crimes during the period.

More than 5,000 of the crimes resulted from email or social media hacks, costing targets £14.8m.

Police said email and social media were being targeted in order to gain access to individuals’ personal details, putting them at risk of identity theft.

Mattie Wright 2018-11-30
img

Cisco has announced plans to help provide cybersecurity training for thousands of UK police in the latest attempt to curb the rise of online crime.

The tech giant has announced its Cisco Networking Academy will be providing specialised training and guidance to 120,000 officers across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The partnership will allow the police force to utilise Cisco's cybersecurity expertise, and build a strong and successful skill programme for officers at all levels of seniority.

The Cisco Networking Academy offers a range of specialised tech-focused programmes, with online and in-person learning options available.

“We are very pleased to be working with Cisco Networking Academy," said Andy Beet from the National Police Chiefs’ Council.

"By joining the programme, forces can access training designed to raise awareness and increase their understanding of cybercrime and cyber threats, while also gaining insights into the procedures used to defend networks."