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Zachary Stell 2016-07-12
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Health care is the next frontier for DeepMind, says researcher David Silver

AlphaGo plays Lee Se-dol on March 9, 2016. Credit: Google

AlphaGo's uncanny success at the game of Go was taken by many as a death knell for the dominance of the human intellect, but Google researcher David Silver doesn't see it that way.

As one of the lead architects behind Google DeepMind's AlphaGo system, which defeated South Korean Go champion Lee Se-dol 4 games to 1 in March, Silver believes the technology's next role should be to help advance human health.

"We'd like to use these technologies to have a positive impact in the real world," he told an audience of AI researchers Tuesday at the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence in New York.

With more possible board combinations than there are atoms in the universe, Go has long been considered the ultimate challenge for AI researchers.

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0
Corey Matthew 2016-07-13
img

South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol reviews his second match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo in Seoul on March 10, 2016.

The human Go champion said he was left "speechless" after his second straight loss to Google's Go-playing machine.

collect
0
Raymond Powers 2016-06-06
img

Humanity has been given another chance to redeem itself: Google s Go-playing computer will compete against the world s best Go player, Ke Jie, before the year is out.

Ke initially boasted that he could beat the AlphaGo machine, which sounds like big talk, but then told Chinese news media that he didn t want to play because then it would copy his playing style.

Though computers have long been able to win games—it s been almost 20 years since Deep Blue beat chess champion Garry Kasparov—the match was a big deal because Go is a much more complicated game than chess.

Since Sedol s loss, others have wanted to try their luck or skill against the machine, with a state-run Chinese newspaper announcing that it wants to pit its own engineers against AlphaGo.

Though Ke is currently the world number one after beating Sedol to the title earlier this year, Engadget notes that Sedol is widely seen as the Roger Federer of Go because of his greater experience.

Because Ke and Sedol are probably fairly evenly matched in skill, the new game against AlphaGo may not mean too much.

collect
0
Dave Rogriguez 2017-10-19
img

DeepMind's AlphaGo was announced back in January 2016 as a proof-of-concept design showcasing the capabilities of Google's deep learning platform.

By March that year AlphaGo had beaten human champion Lee Se-dol - a feat previously thought impossible for computer systems given the complexity of Go compared to the more computer-friendly game of chess.

AlphaGo Zero, though, is something very different.

Where AlphaGo was trained on data culled from thousands of games of Go played by humans, AlphaGo Zero has taught itself the game entirely from first principles simply by being handed the rule set and being told to play against itself.

Three days after the project launched, DeepMind has claimed, AlphaGo Zero had already surpassed the version of AlphaGo which beat Lee Se-dol in 2016; by day 21 it had reached the level of the carefully-trained AlphaGo Master, which beat 60 top-class human players; by day 40 it had become, by Elo rating, the greatest Go player in human or machine history.

Another feature of AlphaGo Zero is its efficiency: Like AlphaGo Master, AlphaGo Zero runs on four of Google's custom Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) deep-learning accelerator chips.

collect
0
Michael Wilson 2016-06-06
img

Google s DeepMind AI project silenced many critics earlier this year when its AlphaGo program dominated Lee Sedol in a five-game Go series.

Many were surprised when AlphaGo managed to upset Lee in March, as it s generally agreed upon that the grandmaster is among the very best Go players ever.

On the other hand, Ke tops the rankings by Elo score, and has held that position for a couple of years now.

Despite this, the player has committed to a series.

If the program can vanquish the Go player currently considered to be humanity s best, machines will unquestionably be able to claim bragging rights over us humans — even if it was us that created them, as well as the game.

There are currently no details as to where the series will be held, but the contest is expected to take place before the end of the year.

collect
0
Jose Hilton 2016-06-09
img

AI once again effortlessly outmaneuvered us poor bags of flesh.

Except there s one crucial thing AlphaGo couldn t do: pick up those black and white Go stones and put them down on the board.

And this, it turns out, is the real challenge for our emerging Skynet.

In this contest, robots had to grab loose objects—like a package of Oreos or a rubber duck—and put them in a container.

Today s workplace robots—like the droids that move stuff around in Amazon warehouses or the robots that weld parts on automobile assembly lines—work in super-clean structured environments designed to accommodate their potent but narrow set of capabilities.

One approach is soft pneumatics, designed to cushion a grab at everyday objects, says Oliver Brock, head of the Robotics and Biology Lab at the Technical University of Berlin which won the Amazon Picking Challenge .

collect
0
Thomas Park 2016-10-09
img

South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol reviews his second match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo in Seoul on March 10, 2016.

The human Go champion said he was left "speechless" after his second straight loss to Google's Go-playing machine.

collect
0
David Reilly 2017-01-04

Over the last few days, an unknown Go player named Master has won 60 of 61 online matches against some of the best players in the world.

Google has now fessed-up, admitting that Master is actually the AlphaGo AI, and that it has been secretly playing humans in order to test an improved version.

Google s AlphaGo, developed by British AI lab DeepMind, made history last year when it became the first AI to beat a professional Go player, namely Lee Sedol.

We haven t heard very much about AlphaGo since the end of the five-game tournament, but it now appears that this computer program has been very busy lately.

Since 29th December, Go players using the online Tygem platform have been getting annihilated by an unknown player named Master in accelerated, time-controlled games.

And we re not talking chumps; players defeated included Korea s Park Jung-hwan ranked no.

collect
0
Christopher Driskell 2016-06-06
img

Humanity has been given another chance to redeem itself: Google s Go-playing computer will compete against the world s best Go player, Ke Jie, before the year is out.

Ke initially boasted that he could beat the AlphaGo machine, which sounds like big talk, but then told Chinese news media that he didn t want to play because then it would copy his playing style.

Though computers have long been able to win games it s been almost 20 years since Deep Blue beat chess champion Garry Kasparov the match was a big deal because Go is a much more complicated game than chess.

Since Sedol s loss, others have wanted to try their luck or skill against the machine, with a state-run Chinese newspaper announcing that it wants to pit its own engineers against AlphaGo.

Though Ke is currently the world number one after beating Sedol to the title earlier this year, Engadget notes that Sedol is widely seen as the Roger Federer of Go because of his greater experience.

Because Ke and Sedol are probably fairly evenly matched in skill, the new game against AlphaGo may not mean too much.

collect
0
David Carter 2017-10-19
img

A självlärt programs have become the new world champion at the game of Go.

Last year, Google DeepMinds AI AlphaGo world champion after beating the world's best man, Lee Se-Dol, 100 times.

Now it has new and updated program AlphaGo Zero beaten its predecessor.

only 36 hours, where the program only had information about the rules, managed to become better than AlphaPro.

After the 40 days had had a win percentage of 90.

So here describes Mikael Kågebäck, a doctoral student in the department of computer science at Chalmers university of technology the feat.

collect
0
Irene Diaz 2017-01-04
img

AlphaGo and Lee Sedol playing Go

AlphaGo plays Lee Sedol in 2016

Google DeepMind s Go-playing AI has done it again.

After beating top player Lee Sedol at the ancient Chinese game in 2016, the AlphaGo AI has been secretly taking on more of the world s best players – and beating them.

For the last few days, an unknown player called Master has been thrashing players on an online Go platform called Tygem.

Master beat the world number one player Ke Jie twice, and won 50 out of 51 games that it played, drawing the one it didn t win outright due to an internet connection time out.

collect
0
Howard Marsh 2016-06-06
img

What s even more amazing about the whole thing is that Ke Jie, the Chinese Go prodigy in question, is just 18 years old.

DON T MISS: Wild rumors paint an unlikely picture for the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus

AlphaGo beat Lee Se-dol in March, winning four out of the five games that took place.

In fact, AlphaGo won three straight games in a row against the human, settling the dispute long before the fifth match.

However, as Ars Technica points out, Lee was the world s top-rated Go Player between 2007 and 2011 and was ranked fourth when he faced AlphaGo.

He changed tune soon after AlphaGo won the third game.

Chinese news agency Xinhua reported that International Go Federation executive member Yang Jun an announced on Sunday that Ke will play AlphaGo by the end of the year.

collect
0
Robert Woodward 2017-01-04
img

Over the last few days, an unknown Go player named Master has won 60 of 61 online matches against some of the best players in the world.

Google has now fessed-up, admitting that Master is actually the AlphaGo AI, and that it has been secretly playing humans in order to test an improved version.

Google s AlphaGo, developed by British AI lab DeepMind, made history last year when it became the first AI to beat a professional Go player, namely Lee Sedol.

We haven t heard very much about AlphaGo since the end of the five-game tournament, but it now appears that this computer program has been very busy lately.

Since 29th December, Go players using the online Tygem platform have been getting annihilated by an unknown player named Master in accelerated, time-controlled games.

And we re not talking chumps; players defeated included Korea s Park Jung-hwan ranked no.

collect
0
Cornelius Jones 2017-10-10
img

Watching Lee Sedol —one of the most skilled humans on the planet when it comes to the ancient game of Go — lose to a machine over and over again is hard to take.

But his abilities proved to be no match for AlphaGo — an algorithm developed by Google DeepMind, which lends its name to the new film directed by Gary Kohs.

Business Insider went to watch the film's UK premiere at the BFI London Film Festival on Monday.

The artificially intelligent AlphaGo algorithm, programmed to learn how to play Go by analysing previous Go games and playing against older versions of itself, beat Lee Sedol 4-1 in a five match tournament at a Four Seasons hotel in Seoul last March.

At this point in the documentary you realise the ability of the AI and you can't help but feel slightly scared.

During these early games, Lee Sedol can be seen pausing for thought while having a cigarette on the luxury hotel terrace.

collect
0
Frances Buoy 2017-05-23
img

p Google’s AlphaGo AI has won the first game of Go in a three-part series against the best human player at the game, Ke Jei.

AlphaGo is making a name for itself defeating some of the best Go players in the world after it took on the Korean maestro Lee Se-dol and won, last year.

Now the artificial intelligence has its sights set on Ke Jei after this first round victory, in a set of matches taking place at Google’s Future of Go Summit in China this week.

Related: Google I/O 2017 – The biggest announcements

The full first round match can be watched below:

AlphaGo’s victory isn't as straightforward as it seems, however.

collect
0
Jonathan Godbey 2016-12-24
img

A distinctive feature of 2016 is that several cutting-edge techniques that came out to stand on the verge of breakthrough several years now, actually, seems to be coming to the much talked about breakthroughs.

the Ai has hajpats hard since at least the eighties is perhaps the best example.

If you believe Wikipedia, there are more choices in the board game Go than there are atoms in the visible universe .

considering it, it does not appear so strange to an ai program came to beat the world champion in Go sydkoreanen Lee Se-dol .

The most interesting thing about the fight, which took place in march, perhaps, is a comparison of Lee Se-dols attitude before the game and how it went.

Lee was sure to win.

collect
0
Zachary Stell 2016-07-12
img

Health care is the next frontier for DeepMind, says researcher David Silver

AlphaGo plays Lee Se-dol on March 9, 2016. Credit: Google

AlphaGo's uncanny success at the game of Go was taken by many as a death knell for the dominance of the human intellect, but Google researcher David Silver doesn't see it that way.

As one of the lead architects behind Google DeepMind's AlphaGo system, which defeated South Korean Go champion Lee Se-dol 4 games to 1 in March, Silver believes the technology's next role should be to help advance human health.

"We'd like to use these technologies to have a positive impact in the real world," he told an audience of AI researchers Tuesday at the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence in New York.

With more possible board combinations than there are atoms in the universe, Go has long been considered the ultimate challenge for AI researchers.

Raymond Powers 2016-06-06
img

Humanity has been given another chance to redeem itself: Google s Go-playing computer will compete against the world s best Go player, Ke Jie, before the year is out.

Ke initially boasted that he could beat the AlphaGo machine, which sounds like big talk, but then told Chinese news media that he didn t want to play because then it would copy his playing style.

Though computers have long been able to win games—it s been almost 20 years since Deep Blue beat chess champion Garry Kasparov—the match was a big deal because Go is a much more complicated game than chess.

Since Sedol s loss, others have wanted to try their luck or skill against the machine, with a state-run Chinese newspaper announcing that it wants to pit its own engineers against AlphaGo.

Though Ke is currently the world number one after beating Sedol to the title earlier this year, Engadget notes that Sedol is widely seen as the Roger Federer of Go because of his greater experience.

Because Ke and Sedol are probably fairly evenly matched in skill, the new game against AlphaGo may not mean too much.

Michael Wilson 2016-06-06
img

Google s DeepMind AI project silenced many critics earlier this year when its AlphaGo program dominated Lee Sedol in a five-game Go series.

Many were surprised when AlphaGo managed to upset Lee in March, as it s generally agreed upon that the grandmaster is among the very best Go players ever.

On the other hand, Ke tops the rankings by Elo score, and has held that position for a couple of years now.

Despite this, the player has committed to a series.

If the program can vanquish the Go player currently considered to be humanity s best, machines will unquestionably be able to claim bragging rights over us humans — even if it was us that created them, as well as the game.

There are currently no details as to where the series will be held, but the contest is expected to take place before the end of the year.

Thomas Park 2016-10-09
img

South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol reviews his second match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo in Seoul on March 10, 2016.

The human Go champion said he was left "speechless" after his second straight loss to Google's Go-playing machine.

Christopher Driskell 2016-06-06
img

Humanity has been given another chance to redeem itself: Google s Go-playing computer will compete against the world s best Go player, Ke Jie, before the year is out.

Ke initially boasted that he could beat the AlphaGo machine, which sounds like big talk, but then told Chinese news media that he didn t want to play because then it would copy his playing style.

Though computers have long been able to win games it s been almost 20 years since Deep Blue beat chess champion Garry Kasparov the match was a big deal because Go is a much more complicated game than chess.

Since Sedol s loss, others have wanted to try their luck or skill against the machine, with a state-run Chinese newspaper announcing that it wants to pit its own engineers against AlphaGo.

Though Ke is currently the world number one after beating Sedol to the title earlier this year, Engadget notes that Sedol is widely seen as the Roger Federer of Go because of his greater experience.

Because Ke and Sedol are probably fairly evenly matched in skill, the new game against AlphaGo may not mean too much.

Irene Diaz 2017-01-04
img

AlphaGo and Lee Sedol playing Go

AlphaGo plays Lee Sedol in 2016

Google DeepMind s Go-playing AI has done it again.

After beating top player Lee Sedol at the ancient Chinese game in 2016, the AlphaGo AI has been secretly taking on more of the world s best players – and beating them.

For the last few days, an unknown player called Master has been thrashing players on an online Go platform called Tygem.

Master beat the world number one player Ke Jie twice, and won 50 out of 51 games that it played, drawing the one it didn t win outright due to an internet connection time out.

Robert Woodward 2017-01-04
img

Over the last few days, an unknown Go player named Master has won 60 of 61 online matches against some of the best players in the world.

Google has now fessed-up, admitting that Master is actually the AlphaGo AI, and that it has been secretly playing humans in order to test an improved version.

Google s AlphaGo, developed by British AI lab DeepMind, made history last year when it became the first AI to beat a professional Go player, namely Lee Sedol.

We haven t heard very much about AlphaGo since the end of the five-game tournament, but it now appears that this computer program has been very busy lately.

Since 29th December, Go players using the online Tygem platform have been getting annihilated by an unknown player named Master in accelerated, time-controlled games.

And we re not talking chumps; players defeated included Korea s Park Jung-hwan ranked no.

Frances Buoy 2017-05-23
img

p Google’s AlphaGo AI has won the first game of Go in a three-part series against the best human player at the game, Ke Jei.

AlphaGo is making a name for itself defeating some of the best Go players in the world after it took on the Korean maestro Lee Se-dol and won, last year.

Now the artificial intelligence has its sights set on Ke Jei after this first round victory, in a set of matches taking place at Google’s Future of Go Summit in China this week.

Related: Google I/O 2017 – The biggest announcements

The full first round match can be watched below:

AlphaGo’s victory isn't as straightforward as it seems, however.

Corey Matthew 2016-07-13
img

South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol reviews his second match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo in Seoul on March 10, 2016.

The human Go champion said he was left "speechless" after his second straight loss to Google's Go-playing machine.

Dave Rogriguez 2017-10-19
img

DeepMind's AlphaGo was announced back in January 2016 as a proof-of-concept design showcasing the capabilities of Google's deep learning platform.

By March that year AlphaGo had beaten human champion Lee Se-dol - a feat previously thought impossible for computer systems given the complexity of Go compared to the more computer-friendly game of chess.

AlphaGo Zero, though, is something very different.

Where AlphaGo was trained on data culled from thousands of games of Go played by humans, AlphaGo Zero has taught itself the game entirely from first principles simply by being handed the rule set and being told to play against itself.

Three days after the project launched, DeepMind has claimed, AlphaGo Zero had already surpassed the version of AlphaGo which beat Lee Se-dol in 2016; by day 21 it had reached the level of the carefully-trained AlphaGo Master, which beat 60 top-class human players; by day 40 it had become, by Elo rating, the greatest Go player in human or machine history.

Another feature of AlphaGo Zero is its efficiency: Like AlphaGo Master, AlphaGo Zero runs on four of Google's custom Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) deep-learning accelerator chips.

Jose Hilton 2016-06-09
img

AI once again effortlessly outmaneuvered us poor bags of flesh.

Except there s one crucial thing AlphaGo couldn t do: pick up those black and white Go stones and put them down on the board.

And this, it turns out, is the real challenge for our emerging Skynet.

In this contest, robots had to grab loose objects—like a package of Oreos or a rubber duck—and put them in a container.

Today s workplace robots—like the droids that move stuff around in Amazon warehouses or the robots that weld parts on automobile assembly lines—work in super-clean structured environments designed to accommodate their potent but narrow set of capabilities.

One approach is soft pneumatics, designed to cushion a grab at everyday objects, says Oliver Brock, head of the Robotics and Biology Lab at the Technical University of Berlin which won the Amazon Picking Challenge .

David Reilly 2017-01-04

Over the last few days, an unknown Go player named Master has won 60 of 61 online matches against some of the best players in the world.

Google has now fessed-up, admitting that Master is actually the AlphaGo AI, and that it has been secretly playing humans in order to test an improved version.

Google s AlphaGo, developed by British AI lab DeepMind, made history last year when it became the first AI to beat a professional Go player, namely Lee Sedol.

We haven t heard very much about AlphaGo since the end of the five-game tournament, but it now appears that this computer program has been very busy lately.

Since 29th December, Go players using the online Tygem platform have been getting annihilated by an unknown player named Master in accelerated, time-controlled games.

And we re not talking chumps; players defeated included Korea s Park Jung-hwan ranked no.

David Carter 2017-10-19
img

A självlärt programs have become the new world champion at the game of Go.

Last year, Google DeepMinds AI AlphaGo world champion after beating the world's best man, Lee Se-Dol, 100 times.

Now it has new and updated program AlphaGo Zero beaten its predecessor.

only 36 hours, where the program only had information about the rules, managed to become better than AlphaPro.

After the 40 days had had a win percentage of 90.

So here describes Mikael Kågebäck, a doctoral student in the department of computer science at Chalmers university of technology the feat.

Howard Marsh 2016-06-06
img

What s even more amazing about the whole thing is that Ke Jie, the Chinese Go prodigy in question, is just 18 years old.

DON T MISS: Wild rumors paint an unlikely picture for the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus

AlphaGo beat Lee Se-dol in March, winning four out of the five games that took place.

In fact, AlphaGo won three straight games in a row against the human, settling the dispute long before the fifth match.

However, as Ars Technica points out, Lee was the world s top-rated Go Player between 2007 and 2011 and was ranked fourth when he faced AlphaGo.

He changed tune soon after AlphaGo won the third game.

Chinese news agency Xinhua reported that International Go Federation executive member Yang Jun an announced on Sunday that Ke will play AlphaGo by the end of the year.

Cornelius Jones 2017-10-10
img

Watching Lee Sedol —one of the most skilled humans on the planet when it comes to the ancient game of Go — lose to a machine over and over again is hard to take.

But his abilities proved to be no match for AlphaGo — an algorithm developed by Google DeepMind, which lends its name to the new film directed by Gary Kohs.

Business Insider went to watch the film's UK premiere at the BFI London Film Festival on Monday.

The artificially intelligent AlphaGo algorithm, programmed to learn how to play Go by analysing previous Go games and playing against older versions of itself, beat Lee Sedol 4-1 in a five match tournament at a Four Seasons hotel in Seoul last March.

At this point in the documentary you realise the ability of the AI and you can't help but feel slightly scared.

During these early games, Lee Sedol can be seen pausing for thought while having a cigarette on the luxury hotel terrace.

Jonathan Godbey 2016-12-24
img

A distinctive feature of 2016 is that several cutting-edge techniques that came out to stand on the verge of breakthrough several years now, actually, seems to be coming to the much talked about breakthroughs.

the Ai has hajpats hard since at least the eighties is perhaps the best example.

If you believe Wikipedia, there are more choices in the board game Go than there are atoms in the visible universe .

considering it, it does not appear so strange to an ai program came to beat the world champion in Go sydkoreanen Lee Se-dol .

The most interesting thing about the fight, which took place in march, perhaps, is a comparison of Lee Se-dols attitude before the game and how it went.

Lee was sure to win.