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James Lamb 2017-02-11
img

If you re not careful out in the cold of winter, you could end up getting frostbite which can cause serious harm to your extremities or areas of exposed skin.

This graphic shows you how to treat it before it gets bad.

As the image courtesy of advice site the Art of Manliness explains, you need to identify frostbite by sight and feel.

Affected areas will start out sore, but they can become numb, leading you to think there s nothing wrong simply because there s no pain.

Watch for skin that starts red, then becomes unusually pale and firm.

Once you ve identified the area, dry it off and keep it covered.

collect
0
Jeanne Hoffman 2016-07-17
img

The most common way to address the loss is a prosthetic, which attempts to at least give the wearer some of the dexterity back they ve lost.

Tattoo aficionados will appreciate French artist JC Sheitan Tenet s prosthetic arm.

Developed with the assistance of fellow French artist JL Gonzal, the arm is made of pieces from a typewriter, manometer, a traditional tattoo gun, and various pipes, along with the necessary sensors to detect movement.

With the prosthetic, Tenet has full movement to tattoo his intricate designs.

He still needs to move his shoulder and upper arm to utilize the tattoo gun, but the two hope to incorporate wrist and finger-like movements in future designs.

One of his latest creations is a prosthetic arm called LUKE, which allows wearers to manipulate the arm in natural movements, so they can pick up a can, grab some groceries, or carry out other basic tasks.

collect
0
David Carter 2016-06-09
img

These simple replacements are relatively affordable and easy to produce, but they are limited when it comes to specialty uses.

Meanwhile, specialty limbs, especially ones designed for athletic purposes, can cost thousands of dollars and must be designed specifically for the user.

Pursuing the 3D printing route is what young amputee Logan did when he wanted to play basketball and needed a hoop-shooting hand, reports 3DPrint.

To help Logan reach his dream of playing basketball, the team over at AIO Robotics, the company behind the Zeus All-in-One 3D Printer, offered their 3D-printing expertise.

The team also decided to use three fingers instead of four, and equipped each one with a rubber grip on the tip for improved ball handling.

Each prosthetic hand has 30 individual parts that were printed on the AIO Robotics Zeus and held together using nylon wire and screws.

collect
0
Jeremy Green 2016-07-28
img

Earlier this year, Eidos Montreal announced a partnership with prosthetics specialist Open Bionics to create bionic arms inspired by the game franchise Deus Ex.

The human augmentations of Deus Ex made for an obvious tie-in, but the announcement also brought to light the work Open Bionics is doing to make prosthetics more affordable.

Open Bionics is using 3D printing to bring less expensive prosthetics to market, and will also be making its blueprints available royalty-free, letting people modify their own designs.

We went down to Open Bionics to talk to them about what they're doing to radically change the process of creating prosthetics, and how their partnership with Deus Ex has got them thinking about bionic limbs being used not just as medical products to replace limbs, but as additional devices to augment.

You can watch the full video below.

collect
0
Damion Gutierrez 2017-04-26
img

A Dutch man has become the first person in the Netherlands to receive a mind-controlled prosthetic limb attached directly to his skeletal system.

Patient Johan Baggerman can control his robotic arm through a Bluetooth 'bracelet' that detects signals from nerve endings in his arm socket, allowing him to control the limb just by thinking about it.

Unlike traditional prosthetics that require a prosthetic socket, Baggerman's arm is attached to a metal rob connected directly to his bone marrow.

This allows the limb to clicked into place and removed easily, providing a wider range of movement well as avoiding chafing and similar skin problems caused by prosthesis sockets.

In order to have precise control of the limb, plastic surgeons had to attach the nerves used to control hand and arm movements to the muscles in Baggerman's upper arm, reports Science Daily.

Once these had grown in, the muscle signals became strong enough to be detected by electrodes surrounding the upper arm, which sends signals to a computer inside the arm via Bluetooth to allow movement.

collect
0
Joel Schroeder 2017-05-26

p A groundbreaking mind-controlled device could help paralysed stroke patients regain movement in their limbs.

Using a brain-computer interface, the uninjured areas of the patients’ brains were trained to take over functions previously carried out by the injured sections of the brain, says the study.

What’s more, almost two-thirds of stroke survivors leave hospital with a disability.

In the first weeks after a stroke, people rapidly recover some abilities, but their progress typically plateaus after around three months, say the researchers.

In general, areas of the brain that control movement are on the opposite side of the body from the limbs they control.

However, around a decade ago, the researchers discovered that a small area of the brain played a role in planning movement on the same side of the body.

collect
0
Ed Furnace 2016-11-03

Samantha Payne s Open Bionics turns children with limb differences into superheroes with its robotic hands, inspired by the worlds of Frozen, Star Wars and Iron Man.

Payne s use of 3D scanning and printing has made it 20 times less expensive to create artificial limbs, giving the world s two million upper limb amputees the chance to use prosthetic limbs that a couple of years ago would have been prohibitively expensive.

Payne co-founded Open Bionics in 2014.

It won a $250,000 £201,000 cash prize at the finals of Intel's 'Make it Wearable Challenge' for its work developing low-cost bionic hands that look and feel good.

The human hand is super amazing – we don t think about it because we use them all the time, but they re so strong, you can move them so quickly and they tell you so much about the world.

Payne s four-person robotics team can build a fully customised bionic arm in just three days while a prosthetic arm from the NHS can take up to three months.

collect
0
Robert Sanchez 2016-07-05
img

Someone needed to address the elephant in the room.

Mosha, an Asian elephant who lost her right foreleg at just 7 months old when she stepped on a land mine on Thailand s border with Myanmar got her ninth prosthetic limb on June 29, which ended up saving her life.

The way she walked was unbalanced and her spine was going to bend, Dr. Therdchai Jivacate, the orthopedist surgeon who designed the artificial leg, told Reuters.

Jivacate made Mosha her first prosthetic leg six years ago when he met her at Friends of the Asian Elephant Foundation when the majestic mammal was 2 and a half.

Back then, Mosha weighed 1,300 pounds, now she weighs 4,000 and her artificial legs need to be redesigned to keep up with her growing body.

But the very first one was quite a challenge.

collect
0
James Dixon 2016-08-19
img

An un-strung recurve bow, showing the recurved limbs and the central riser.

To find out how this equipment actually functions, we took a subway ride to Gotham Archery, where Anjalie Field walked us through all the moving and, hopefully, stationary parts of a bow that's fit for competitive archery.

Field got hooked on the sport while young, and she loved it so much that when she ended up at a college without an archery team, she founded one.

The string on a compound bow is threaded through a series of pulleys.

While there are international competitions for compound bows, Olympic competitions use what are called recurves.

The structure is also made to dampen vibrations that would otherwise occur when the string is released.

collect
0
Dwayne Alcorn 2016-09-16
img

September is like Christmas for iPhones and their proud parents , with a new version of iOS coming down the digital chimney and delivering a healthy platter of software treats.

The trouble is, it's not always immediately obvious exactly where all of the new toys are hiding on your iPhone.

So we've made this little iOS orienteering guide, pointing out some of the most interesting waypoints to visit on your way around Apple's zippy new operating system.

We'll no doubt unearth some more hidden treasure along the way, but these are the ten new features to wrap your thumbs around first...

URLS are great and all - navigating the interwebs would be a nightmare without them - but boy, can they be ugly, especially when pasted into a message.

Not only that, but you can send stickers, add special background effects like fireworks and use supported apps directly in your chats too, such as sending someone your location using Citymapper.

collect
0
Charles Rodriguez 2016-11-29
img

Scientists are using immortal worms to learn how humans could regrow limbs after amputation or restore nervous system function after a spinal injury.

To look at an acorn worm, you wouldn t guess that they were one of our closest invertebrate relatives, but they actually share thousands of genes with humans.

Shawn Luttrell, a lead author on the paper, said: We have many, if not all, of the same genes they are using to regenerate their body structures.

In theory this similar genetic makeup means that we should be able to achieve similar functionality.

Acorn worms are able to magically regrow every major body part – including the head, nervous system and internal organs.

Cut them in half, and within 15 days they have replaced their mouth, nose, heart, kidneys, and have even developed a new neural tube the precursor to a central nervous system .

collect
0
Julie Romero 2017-05-03
img

p In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency vowed to build, within four years, a brain-controlled prosthetic arm indistinguishable from the real thing.

Yet after hundreds of millions of dollars and more than a decade of engineering, most limb replacements (even those wired straight to the noggin) struggle to mimic human gestures.

Cracking the neural code for movement was trickier than expected.

The trouble lies in getting past conscious thought.

“Capturing the body’s innate ability to just know what to do is something really lacking from all prosthetics today,” says Mike McLoughlin, who manages the prosthetics program at Johns Hopkins.

So the latest attempts at a true bionic arm simply avoid the problem of intention by using machine learning and computer vision to make decisions.

collect
0
Kristie Hernandez 2017-04-13
img

This partnership is transforming the lives of landmine victims who have lost limbs by 3D-printed prostheses.

Cambodia’s only 3D-printing company teamed up with a Canadian prosthetics non-governmental organization to create 3D-printed artificial hands for Cambodian victims of land mine explosions.

The pairing of ARC Hub PNH and the Victoria Hand Project is intended to make a difference in a country which has among the highest casualty rates of land mines in the world.

To date, an estimated 40,000 people in Cambodia have had limbs amputated as the result of land mine explosions.

At present, only a fraction of those people have been helped by the new initiative but the proof-of-concept study hints at greater things.

As part of the pairing, a total of 25 3D-printed prosthetics were built.

collect
0
Joshua Herbert 2016-12-03
img

Phantom limb pain is a mysterious ailment: people with amputations experience aches and acute pains in an arm or leg that isn t there — making the problem notoriously difficult to treat.

The AR therapy method, first proposed in 2014 by Max Ortiz Catalan of the Chalmers University of Technology, just completed its first, highly promising clinical trial.

The team selected 14 amputees whose phantom limb pain was chronic and unresponsive to other therapy methods.

Once this calibration is complete, the virtual limb is superimposed on a live webcam image of the patient, starting just where the real limb stops.

The user thinks of movements, and the virtual limb executes them.

Amazingly, by the end of the 12 sessions, reported pain was reduced by about half, and interruptions of daily activity or sleep from it were similarly cut down.

collect
0
Eric Whitefield 2018-06-21
img

The remains of two Civil War soldiers have been discovered in a surgeon’s burial pit at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia.

“This is the first time in history that a surgeon’s pit at a Civil War battlefield has been professionally excavated and studied,” explained the National Park Service, in a statement.

“It is also the first time that killed-in-action Civil War soldiers have been found in an amputated limb burial pit.”

The discovery was first made by the National Park Service in 2014.

In addition to the soldiers’ remains, 11 amputated limbs were also found in the hastily dug pit, confirming that it was the site of a field hospital.

The complete remains belong to two Caucasian males aged between 25 and 34 years of age that died at the second battle of Manassas.

collect
0
Jarvis Lett 2017-03-09
img

It was vision, not limbs, that led fish on to land, according to a groundbreaking study of evolution published this week.

But let’s hope it’s neither vision nor limbs that leads artificial intelligence to make its own evolutionary breakthrough.

Boston Dynamics has recently unveiled a robot that puts our human limbs to shame – and now Google has announced a major step forward for AI vision.

With the aid of machine learning, the tech giant’s Cloud Video Intelligence API can recognise objects in videos, and it’s frighteningly astute.

Announcing the breakthrough at Google’s Next Cloud Conference, the company’s chief scientist for cloud AI, Fei-Fei Li, showed how the API could ‘watch’ a commercial and identify not only a daschund in the ad, but also that the video was a commercial, The Verge reported.

In a further example in a blog, Google showed how the API was able to identify that a video (see above) featured a tiger and that it’s living in a zoo.

collect
0
James Lamb 2017-02-11
img

If you re not careful out in the cold of winter, you could end up getting frostbite which can cause serious harm to your extremities or areas of exposed skin.

This graphic shows you how to treat it before it gets bad.

As the image courtesy of advice site the Art of Manliness explains, you need to identify frostbite by sight and feel.

Affected areas will start out sore, but they can become numb, leading you to think there s nothing wrong simply because there s no pain.

Watch for skin that starts red, then becomes unusually pale and firm.

Once you ve identified the area, dry it off and keep it covered.

David Carter 2016-06-09
img

These simple replacements are relatively affordable and easy to produce, but they are limited when it comes to specialty uses.

Meanwhile, specialty limbs, especially ones designed for athletic purposes, can cost thousands of dollars and must be designed specifically for the user.

Pursuing the 3D printing route is what young amputee Logan did when he wanted to play basketball and needed a hoop-shooting hand, reports 3DPrint.

To help Logan reach his dream of playing basketball, the team over at AIO Robotics, the company behind the Zeus All-in-One 3D Printer, offered their 3D-printing expertise.

The team also decided to use three fingers instead of four, and equipped each one with a rubber grip on the tip for improved ball handling.

Each prosthetic hand has 30 individual parts that were printed on the AIO Robotics Zeus and held together using nylon wire and screws.

Damion Gutierrez 2017-04-26
img

A Dutch man has become the first person in the Netherlands to receive a mind-controlled prosthetic limb attached directly to his skeletal system.

Patient Johan Baggerman can control his robotic arm through a Bluetooth 'bracelet' that detects signals from nerve endings in his arm socket, allowing him to control the limb just by thinking about it.

Unlike traditional prosthetics that require a prosthetic socket, Baggerman's arm is attached to a metal rob connected directly to his bone marrow.

This allows the limb to clicked into place and removed easily, providing a wider range of movement well as avoiding chafing and similar skin problems caused by prosthesis sockets.

In order to have precise control of the limb, plastic surgeons had to attach the nerves used to control hand and arm movements to the muscles in Baggerman's upper arm, reports Science Daily.

Once these had grown in, the muscle signals became strong enough to be detected by electrodes surrounding the upper arm, which sends signals to a computer inside the arm via Bluetooth to allow movement.

Ed Furnace 2016-11-03

Samantha Payne s Open Bionics turns children with limb differences into superheroes with its robotic hands, inspired by the worlds of Frozen, Star Wars and Iron Man.

Payne s use of 3D scanning and printing has made it 20 times less expensive to create artificial limbs, giving the world s two million upper limb amputees the chance to use prosthetic limbs that a couple of years ago would have been prohibitively expensive.

Payne co-founded Open Bionics in 2014.

It won a $250,000 £201,000 cash prize at the finals of Intel's 'Make it Wearable Challenge' for its work developing low-cost bionic hands that look and feel good.

The human hand is super amazing – we don t think about it because we use them all the time, but they re so strong, you can move them so quickly and they tell you so much about the world.

Payne s four-person robotics team can build a fully customised bionic arm in just three days while a prosthetic arm from the NHS can take up to three months.

James Dixon 2016-08-19
img

An un-strung recurve bow, showing the recurved limbs and the central riser.

To find out how this equipment actually functions, we took a subway ride to Gotham Archery, where Anjalie Field walked us through all the moving and, hopefully, stationary parts of a bow that's fit for competitive archery.

Field got hooked on the sport while young, and she loved it so much that when she ended up at a college without an archery team, she founded one.

The string on a compound bow is threaded through a series of pulleys.

While there are international competitions for compound bows, Olympic competitions use what are called recurves.

The structure is also made to dampen vibrations that would otherwise occur when the string is released.

Charles Rodriguez 2016-11-29
img

Scientists are using immortal worms to learn how humans could regrow limbs after amputation or restore nervous system function after a spinal injury.

To look at an acorn worm, you wouldn t guess that they were one of our closest invertebrate relatives, but they actually share thousands of genes with humans.

Shawn Luttrell, a lead author on the paper, said: We have many, if not all, of the same genes they are using to regenerate their body structures.

In theory this similar genetic makeup means that we should be able to achieve similar functionality.

Acorn worms are able to magically regrow every major body part – including the head, nervous system and internal organs.

Cut them in half, and within 15 days they have replaced their mouth, nose, heart, kidneys, and have even developed a new neural tube the precursor to a central nervous system .

Kristie Hernandez 2017-04-13
img

This partnership is transforming the lives of landmine victims who have lost limbs by 3D-printed prostheses.

Cambodia’s only 3D-printing company teamed up with a Canadian prosthetics non-governmental organization to create 3D-printed artificial hands for Cambodian victims of land mine explosions.

The pairing of ARC Hub PNH and the Victoria Hand Project is intended to make a difference in a country which has among the highest casualty rates of land mines in the world.

To date, an estimated 40,000 people in Cambodia have had limbs amputated as the result of land mine explosions.

At present, only a fraction of those people have been helped by the new initiative but the proof-of-concept study hints at greater things.

As part of the pairing, a total of 25 3D-printed prosthetics were built.

Eric Whitefield 2018-06-21
img

The remains of two Civil War soldiers have been discovered in a surgeon’s burial pit at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia.

“This is the first time in history that a surgeon’s pit at a Civil War battlefield has been professionally excavated and studied,” explained the National Park Service, in a statement.

“It is also the first time that killed-in-action Civil War soldiers have been found in an amputated limb burial pit.”

The discovery was first made by the National Park Service in 2014.

In addition to the soldiers’ remains, 11 amputated limbs were also found in the hastily dug pit, confirming that it was the site of a field hospital.

The complete remains belong to two Caucasian males aged between 25 and 34 years of age that died at the second battle of Manassas.

Jeanne Hoffman 2016-07-17
img

The most common way to address the loss is a prosthetic, which attempts to at least give the wearer some of the dexterity back they ve lost.

Tattoo aficionados will appreciate French artist JC Sheitan Tenet s prosthetic arm.

Developed with the assistance of fellow French artist JL Gonzal, the arm is made of pieces from a typewriter, manometer, a traditional tattoo gun, and various pipes, along with the necessary sensors to detect movement.

With the prosthetic, Tenet has full movement to tattoo his intricate designs.

He still needs to move his shoulder and upper arm to utilize the tattoo gun, but the two hope to incorporate wrist and finger-like movements in future designs.

One of his latest creations is a prosthetic arm called LUKE, which allows wearers to manipulate the arm in natural movements, so they can pick up a can, grab some groceries, or carry out other basic tasks.

Jeremy Green 2016-07-28
img

Earlier this year, Eidos Montreal announced a partnership with prosthetics specialist Open Bionics to create bionic arms inspired by the game franchise Deus Ex.

The human augmentations of Deus Ex made for an obvious tie-in, but the announcement also brought to light the work Open Bionics is doing to make prosthetics more affordable.

Open Bionics is using 3D printing to bring less expensive prosthetics to market, and will also be making its blueprints available royalty-free, letting people modify their own designs.

We went down to Open Bionics to talk to them about what they're doing to radically change the process of creating prosthetics, and how their partnership with Deus Ex has got them thinking about bionic limbs being used not just as medical products to replace limbs, but as additional devices to augment.

You can watch the full video below.

Joel Schroeder 2017-05-26

p A groundbreaking mind-controlled device could help paralysed stroke patients regain movement in their limbs.

Using a brain-computer interface, the uninjured areas of the patients’ brains were trained to take over functions previously carried out by the injured sections of the brain, says the study.

What’s more, almost two-thirds of stroke survivors leave hospital with a disability.

In the first weeks after a stroke, people rapidly recover some abilities, but their progress typically plateaus after around three months, say the researchers.

In general, areas of the brain that control movement are on the opposite side of the body from the limbs they control.

However, around a decade ago, the researchers discovered that a small area of the brain played a role in planning movement on the same side of the body.

Robert Sanchez 2016-07-05
img

Someone needed to address the elephant in the room.

Mosha, an Asian elephant who lost her right foreleg at just 7 months old when she stepped on a land mine on Thailand s border with Myanmar got her ninth prosthetic limb on June 29, which ended up saving her life.

The way she walked was unbalanced and her spine was going to bend, Dr. Therdchai Jivacate, the orthopedist surgeon who designed the artificial leg, told Reuters.

Jivacate made Mosha her first prosthetic leg six years ago when he met her at Friends of the Asian Elephant Foundation when the majestic mammal was 2 and a half.

Back then, Mosha weighed 1,300 pounds, now she weighs 4,000 and her artificial legs need to be redesigned to keep up with her growing body.

But the very first one was quite a challenge.

Dwayne Alcorn 2016-09-16
img

September is like Christmas for iPhones and their proud parents , with a new version of iOS coming down the digital chimney and delivering a healthy platter of software treats.

The trouble is, it's not always immediately obvious exactly where all of the new toys are hiding on your iPhone.

So we've made this little iOS orienteering guide, pointing out some of the most interesting waypoints to visit on your way around Apple's zippy new operating system.

We'll no doubt unearth some more hidden treasure along the way, but these are the ten new features to wrap your thumbs around first...

URLS are great and all - navigating the interwebs would be a nightmare without them - but boy, can they be ugly, especially when pasted into a message.

Not only that, but you can send stickers, add special background effects like fireworks and use supported apps directly in your chats too, such as sending someone your location using Citymapper.

Julie Romero 2017-05-03
img

p In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency vowed to build, within four years, a brain-controlled prosthetic arm indistinguishable from the real thing.

Yet after hundreds of millions of dollars and more than a decade of engineering, most limb replacements (even those wired straight to the noggin) struggle to mimic human gestures.

Cracking the neural code for movement was trickier than expected.

The trouble lies in getting past conscious thought.

“Capturing the body’s innate ability to just know what to do is something really lacking from all prosthetics today,” says Mike McLoughlin, who manages the prosthetics program at Johns Hopkins.

So the latest attempts at a true bionic arm simply avoid the problem of intention by using machine learning and computer vision to make decisions.

Joshua Herbert 2016-12-03
img

Phantom limb pain is a mysterious ailment: people with amputations experience aches and acute pains in an arm or leg that isn t there — making the problem notoriously difficult to treat.

The AR therapy method, first proposed in 2014 by Max Ortiz Catalan of the Chalmers University of Technology, just completed its first, highly promising clinical trial.

The team selected 14 amputees whose phantom limb pain was chronic and unresponsive to other therapy methods.

Once this calibration is complete, the virtual limb is superimposed on a live webcam image of the patient, starting just where the real limb stops.

The user thinks of movements, and the virtual limb executes them.

Amazingly, by the end of the 12 sessions, reported pain was reduced by about half, and interruptions of daily activity or sleep from it were similarly cut down.

Jarvis Lett 2017-03-09
img

It was vision, not limbs, that led fish on to land, according to a groundbreaking study of evolution published this week.

But let’s hope it’s neither vision nor limbs that leads artificial intelligence to make its own evolutionary breakthrough.

Boston Dynamics has recently unveiled a robot that puts our human limbs to shame – and now Google has announced a major step forward for AI vision.

With the aid of machine learning, the tech giant’s Cloud Video Intelligence API can recognise objects in videos, and it’s frighteningly astute.

Announcing the breakthrough at Google’s Next Cloud Conference, the company’s chief scientist for cloud AI, Fei-Fei Li, showed how the API could ‘watch’ a commercial and identify not only a daschund in the ad, but also that the video was a commercial, The Verge reported.

In a further example in a blog, Google showed how the API was able to identify that a video (see above) featured a tiger and that it’s living in a zoo.