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Jorge Medina 2017-10-20
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One of the most annoying things about airports, aside from having to get there so early and the obscene cost of everything inside, is getting through security.

Or rather, the queue before you get to the machines.

Well as ever tech might help solve that problem, letting you go off and do some duty free shopping while someone scans your hand luggage.

The government has set aside £3 million for new research designed to help detect hidden explosives.

The aim is to speed up bag screening at airports, without compromising the high levels of security involved.

Proposals include portable versions of the tech that are capable of screening items in places other than regular security checkpoints, and systems that can scan laptops and tablets without them being removed from bags first.

collect
0
Anthony Sullivan 2017-10-20
img

One of the most annoying things about airports, aside from having to get there so early and the obscene cost of everything inside, is getting through security.

Or rather, the queue before you get to the machines.

Well as ever tech might help solve that problem, letting you go off and do some duty free shopping while someone scans your hand luggage.

The government has set aside £3 million for new research designed to help detect hidden explosives.

The aim is to speed up bag screening at airports, without compromising the high levels of security involved.

Proposals include portable versions of the tech that are capable of screening items in places other than regular security checkpoints, and systems that can scan laptops and tablets without them being removed from bags first.

collect
0
Terry Fulmer 2017-09-17
img

The owner of the Evening Standard and Independent is reported to have made a move to buy the Metro newspaper from the DMGT.

DMGT, publisher of the Daily Mail and Mirror, has been considering a sale of the Metro as part of a broader business review.

Metro saw a 9% decline in underlying revenues last year to £65m and suffered a 12% fall in operating profit.

The newspaper has been valued at between £25 and £35m.

According to The Telegraph, ESI Media boss Evgeny Lebedev is said to be interested in adding the Metro to its portfolio with a view to using its nationwide distribution network to launch regional versions of the Standard.

DMGT has not commented on the reports.

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0
James Lamb 2020-10-01
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Prince Harry and Meghan have called for an end to structural racism in the UK, in an exclusive interview with the Evening Standard.

Harry told how he had become made more aware of the struggles people from Black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME) communities face since meeting Meghan. “I wasn’t aware of so many of the issues and so many of the problems within the UK and also globally as well,” he said. “I thought I did, but I didn’t.”

While it’s not about “pointing the finger” or blame, he added, there is a need for “learning” how we can do better.

“I think it is a really exciting time in British culture and British history, and in world culture,” he said. “This is a real moment that we should be grasping and actually celebrating. Because no one else has managed to do this before us.”

During the interview, the Duchess of Sussex was asked about her views on the Black Lives Matter protests, following the death of George Floyd. “When there is just peaceful protest and when there is the intention of just wanting community and just wanting the recognition of equality, then that is a beautiful thing,” she said. 

“It has been challenging for a lot of people, certainly, having to make this reckoning of historical significance that has got people to the place that they are. That is uncomfortable for people. We recognise that. It is uncomfortable for us.”

In a joint article for the Evening Standard, the couple write: “As long as structural racism exists, there will be generations of young people of colour who do not start their lives with the same equality of opportunity as their white peers. And for as long as that continues, untapped potential will never get to be realised.

“Therefore, now is the best time for us to be able to use our platform, and you use your platform as well, so we can actually start a conversation and introduce people to the Black community that are making a massive difference within their own communities and across the UK as a whole as well.”

The couple also spoke about family life, adding that their son Archie is “so good”. “We are very lucky with our little one,” she said. “He is just so busy, he is all over the place. He keeps us on our toes. We are just so lucky.”

To mark the beginning of Black History Month, the pair appeared on a Zoom call from their home in California and revealed their list of Black History Month “next gen trailblazers”.

People recognised for their contribution to British society included Vogue editor Edward Enninful, boxing champion Nicola Adams, and author Bernardine Evaristo.

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0
Freddie Gagne 2017-09-18
img

After shuttering its print paper in March 2016, The Independent is profitable again and can spend more on what its audience wants — and that’s video.

Over the next six months, ESI Media, the parent company of The Independent and the Evening Standard, plans to double its video team to 50.

Each title currently has a team of 10 video specialists, and a central team of five works across both brands on bigger projects.

The Independent needed to get its video offering right before growing its team, according to editor Christian Broughton.

Broadly speaking, The Independent’s original video falls into three categories: foreign correspondence, like reporting on a fire in a refugee camp in Syria; explainers with journalists, such as one with economics editor Ben Chu about whether austerity is over in the U.K.; and mini-documentaries about subjects like a teenage drug dealer.

“These are the ideas that represent the brand and mission of [The Independent].”

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0
Antonio Barron 2017-11-22
img

The Amazon Echo Show, the tech giant’s latest Alexa-enabled device complete with a 7-inch screen, launched last week in the U.K., with media companies like the BBC, The Telegraph and MTV adding video content to their audio skills.

Forty percent of U.K. households will have an Amazon Echo device by early next year, and 9 percent of households already do, according to research from Global and Radioplayer.

Yet the Echo Show, which retails at £199.99 in the U.K. and $230 in the U.S., is far from becoming a mainstream product, and monetization is mostly limited to sponsorship packages with brands.

The Telegraph’s editorial team picks five stories to run on its Echo Show daily bulletin, which can be updated throughout the day as further details unfold.

As Amazon made its Alexa personal assistant available on home sound system Sonos, the addition of the screen on the Echo Show signals Amazon is nearing further integration with smart TV manufacturers — or so publishers believe.

The Telegraph said it has significantly invested time, effort and resources to get video-centric skills ready for launch.

collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2018-03-12
img

A redesign of London's Evening Standard that launches today is shocking the establishment to its very core with one of its changes; it's now using emojis to explain to the kids that rain is bad and sun is nice.

So if you can't identify the sun, perhaps a yellow smiley face might be of use in telling you not to bother with a coat, no matter how expensive it was, as it'll only become a burden later in the day.

The paper's oddly using the poo emoji to describe what it deems to be poor weather, with Thursday and Friday of this week both being illustrated by the brown icon seeing as it's probably going to rain.

We'll have to wait to see what other faces they're planning on using for the days when it's too polluted to breathe outside.

collect
0
Paul Jennette 2017-12-07
img

Former chancellor George Osborne says Labour would be 20 points ahead in polls and “on the cusp of power” if Jeremy Corbyn were not leader.

The Evening Standard editor told a Commons press gallery lunch he believed the Islington MP remained the party’s biggest obstacle to winning an election - while lamenting the state of the Conservative government.

He said: “If the party was led by a more moderate social democrat, of even middling ability, they would now be 20 points ahead in the polls and on the cusp of power.

“Instead the Labour movement is consumed by an internal battle for its soul.”

He said the paper he now edits was giving “extensive coverage” to Labour councillor selection battles in London was because he believed the issue was of national importance.

“It’s not just a London story, it is a national story,” he said.

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0
Raymond Maxwell 2017-03-17
img

We just had to check it's not the first of April, because George Gideon Osborne – Cameron's Chancellor, sacked by May – has been declared the new Editor of London's Evening Standard.

“I am proud to have an editor of such substance, who reinforces the Standard’s standing and influence in London and whose political viewpoint – socially liberal and economically pragmatic – closely matches that of many of our readers.

George is London through and through and I am confident he is the right person to build on the fantastic legacy of Sarah Sands.”

In fairness, he attempted journalism before becoming an MP, but if being Gideon – son of Sir Peter George Osborne, 17th Baronet of Ballentaylor, and Felicity Loxton Peacock, daughter of artist Clarisse Loxton Peacock – a privately-educated Oxford graduate and a Bullingdon Club member is "London through and through" – well, that's a London I've never been to.

The City of London, maybe.

collect
0
William Figueroa 2017-03-17
img

We just had to check it's not the first of April, because George Gideon Osborne – Cameron's Chancellor, sacked by May – has been declared the new Editor of London's Evening Standard.

“I am proud to have an editor of such substance, who reinforces the Standard’s standing and influence in London and whose political viewpoint – socially liberal and economically pragmatic – closely matches that of many of our readers.

George is London through and through and I am confident he is the right person to build on the fantastic legacy of Sarah Sands.”

In fairness, he attempted journalism before becoming an MP, but if being Gideon – son of Sir Peter George Osborne, 17th Baronet of Ballentaylor, and Felicity Loxton Peacock, daughter of artist Clarisse Loxton Peacock – a privately-educated Oxford graduate and a Bullingdon Club member is "London through and through" – well, that's a London I've never been to.

The City of London, maybe.

collect
0
Samuel Norton 2017-10-22
img

The Evening Standard (ES) magazine has admitted it made 'the wrong call' after Solange Knowles called out the publication for airbrushing her braid out of the front cover.

Earlier this week the musician took to Instagram to express frustration that her architectural braided crown had been edited out of the final front splash – which promoted an interview in which she discussed the tradition and legacy of braiding.

The artist told the ES that braiding was an "act of beauty, an act of convenience and an act of tradition" before reposting the original unedited photo to her own social media account after the cover hit shelves.

She captioned the image ‘DTMH’ - an abbreviation of her own track Don’t Touch My Hair.

The magazine said decision to digitally alter the photo was taken for “layout” purposes, however it faced scrutiny online with Knowles' fans accusing it of racism for editing out a significant part of the star's cultural identity.

Angelica Bastien, the journalist behind the ES interview also disassociated herself from the feature in a series of tweets, claiming the title distorted her work.

collect
0
Frank Wilkerson 2018-01-05
img

I think I speak for all metropolitan liberal elites when I say how much I enjoy sitting on the train, slurping my soy flat white, browsing my Evening Standard and holding my phone horizontally whilst I talk to someone via my headphones.

Naturally, in the wake of this news, social media was once again awash with chatter of renationalising the railways, but that’s a stupid idea – and here’s why;

It’s an accepted truth that trains in the UK are pretty crap.

Of course, there is a case for saying that nationalisation would alleviate some of the direct financial burden of train travel, you only have to look at rail services across Europe to see that, but that doesn’t mean it would provide a better service.

Let’s assume for argument’s sake that the increase in tax subsidy would lessen the overall cost from what it is now, it would still not be an improvement of service.

You only have to look at Italy’s Trenitalia to know how cushy the services are here compared, unless of course, you enjoy damp, battered carriages with door hinges likely to lacerate you.

collect
0
Wayne Strickland 2017-09-27
img

Knight will be leaving at the end of October at which time the sponsorship and commercial content teams will report directly into Simon Daglish, deputy managing director of commercial, on an interim basis.

Asics Europe has hired two new faces to give its newly launched integrated marketing communications division a foot up against its rivals.

Robin Karakash joins the company in the newly-created role of director of integrated marketing communication EMEA.

Joining from Auto Trader, where he held the role of advertising director, Patel will be based in the London office as he leads the sales team in the UK.

In the new role, Pereira will be responsible for leading the brands marketing strategy as well as it's go-to-market initiatives.

Nick Sargent has been appointed as publishing director of British GQ, GQ Style and Wired Media Group.

collect
0
Michael Fewell 2017-06-26
img

Bundles of future chip wrappers allegedly nabbed from London rail station

Two men have been charged with theft for allegedly helping themselves to bundles of free newspapers from London Bridge railway station.

The two South London men are said to have pinched bundles of the London Evening Standard, a freesheet, edited by former Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, that is handed out to commuters on weekdays.

Marcel Javier Larezserrano, 35, of Thurland House Manor Estate in the London Borough of Southwark, and Jhon Mejia, 30, of Hampson Way, Lambeth, are each charged with one count of theft, contrary to section 1 of the Theft Act 1968.

Larezserrano and Mejia are due to appear before Central London Magistrates’ Court this afternoon to answer the charges.

Theft is punishable within England and Wales with up to seven years’ imprisonment if charged on indictment.

collect
0
Jose Wenger 2018-02-13
img

Recruiting and radicalising supporter online could soon become a thing of the past for the Islamic militant group.

Radicalising and recruiting members online could soon become a thing of the past for Isis as the UK government cracks down on propaganda.

New software developed by Home Office is able to detect 94% of Isis propaganda without the need for human verification.

Artificial Intelligence is capable of scanning millions of videos and audio files and has an accuracy rating of 99.99%.

At the current rate, human input would only be needed for one in every 20,000 suspicious files.

According to the Evening Standard, Isis uses 400 different sites to upload content to the Internet.

collect
0
George Summers 2021-05-25
img
UK clubbers return to the dance floor as nightclub Circus hosts the first dance event.

Large events like club nights and gigs look likely to go ahead come summer, after a series of pilot events by the government involving 58,000 people resulted in just 15 positive cases of Covid-19.

Since April, the Events Research Programme (ERP) has analysed the Covid risk of several large-scale indoor and outdoor events, including the Brit Awards, the FA Cup Final and a club night in Liverpool.

The events tested a range of interventions – such as altering the layout of the venue, face coverings and ventilation – and all attendees took Covid tests before and after the event.

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden said the events were a “real success” in an interview with the Evening Standard and hopes that by June 21 stadiums will be full and the lights will be back on in the West End.

The indoor gig

The Brit Awards took place on May 11 as part of the government’s live events pilot scheme and was the first large-scale indoor music event of the year.

The ceremony, which included performances by Dua Lipa and Sir Elton John, featured an audience of 4,000 people at the O2 Arena.

No cases emerged from the event where audience members were not socially distanced or required to wear face coverings once seated.

A snooker tournament

Crowds at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield were increased as the snooker tournament progressed, culminating in a full house for the final on May 2 and 3.

Four cases of Covid occurred across the 17 days of the championships.

The outdoor gig

Around 5,000 people packed into Sefton Park in Liverpool earlier this month for an outdoor gig, which included performances from Blossoms, The Lathums and local singer-songwriter Zuzu. 

Two cases were recorded after the event. 

A football match

The FA Cup semi-final between Leicester and Southampton at Wembley on April 18 was the first outdoor sports event to welcome back spectators, though it was limited to residents and key workers living near the stadium.

There have been no cases reported from Wembley.

A night clubbing

Club night Circus hosted The First Dance in Liverpool, where revellers, who all had to produce negative lateral flow tests, did not have to wear face coverings or socially distance.

Nine cases were found among 6,000 clubbers across two nights.

A Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport spokesperson said the mass event figures are based on what has been seen “so far” and further data needs to be collected on other events. They said a full report will be presented to the prime minister on a date to be confirmed.

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0
Jorge Medina 2017-10-20
img

One of the most annoying things about airports, aside from having to get there so early and the obscene cost of everything inside, is getting through security.

Or rather, the queue before you get to the machines.

Well as ever tech might help solve that problem, letting you go off and do some duty free shopping while someone scans your hand luggage.

The government has set aside £3 million for new research designed to help detect hidden explosives.

The aim is to speed up bag screening at airports, without compromising the high levels of security involved.

Proposals include portable versions of the tech that are capable of screening items in places other than regular security checkpoints, and systems that can scan laptops and tablets without them being removed from bags first.

Terry Fulmer 2017-09-17
img

The owner of the Evening Standard and Independent is reported to have made a move to buy the Metro newspaper from the DMGT.

DMGT, publisher of the Daily Mail and Mirror, has been considering a sale of the Metro as part of a broader business review.

Metro saw a 9% decline in underlying revenues last year to £65m and suffered a 12% fall in operating profit.

The newspaper has been valued at between £25 and £35m.

According to The Telegraph, ESI Media boss Evgeny Lebedev is said to be interested in adding the Metro to its portfolio with a view to using its nationwide distribution network to launch regional versions of the Standard.

DMGT has not commented on the reports.

Freddie Gagne 2017-09-18
img

After shuttering its print paper in March 2016, The Independent is profitable again and can spend more on what its audience wants — and that’s video.

Over the next six months, ESI Media, the parent company of The Independent and the Evening Standard, plans to double its video team to 50.

Each title currently has a team of 10 video specialists, and a central team of five works across both brands on bigger projects.

The Independent needed to get its video offering right before growing its team, according to editor Christian Broughton.

Broadly speaking, The Independent’s original video falls into three categories: foreign correspondence, like reporting on a fire in a refugee camp in Syria; explainers with journalists, such as one with economics editor Ben Chu about whether austerity is over in the U.K.; and mini-documentaries about subjects like a teenage drug dealer.

“These are the ideas that represent the brand and mission of [The Independent].”

Lamont Shaw 2018-03-12
img

A redesign of London's Evening Standard that launches today is shocking the establishment to its very core with one of its changes; it's now using emojis to explain to the kids that rain is bad and sun is nice.

So if you can't identify the sun, perhaps a yellow smiley face might be of use in telling you not to bother with a coat, no matter how expensive it was, as it'll only become a burden later in the day.

The paper's oddly using the poo emoji to describe what it deems to be poor weather, with Thursday and Friday of this week both being illustrated by the brown icon seeing as it's probably going to rain.

We'll have to wait to see what other faces they're planning on using for the days when it's too polluted to breathe outside.

Raymond Maxwell 2017-03-17
img

We just had to check it's not the first of April, because George Gideon Osborne – Cameron's Chancellor, sacked by May – has been declared the new Editor of London's Evening Standard.

“I am proud to have an editor of such substance, who reinforces the Standard’s standing and influence in London and whose political viewpoint – socially liberal and economically pragmatic – closely matches that of many of our readers.

George is London through and through and I am confident he is the right person to build on the fantastic legacy of Sarah Sands.”

In fairness, he attempted journalism before becoming an MP, but if being Gideon – son of Sir Peter George Osborne, 17th Baronet of Ballentaylor, and Felicity Loxton Peacock, daughter of artist Clarisse Loxton Peacock – a privately-educated Oxford graduate and a Bullingdon Club member is "London through and through" – well, that's a London I've never been to.

The City of London, maybe.

Samuel Norton 2017-10-22
img

The Evening Standard (ES) magazine has admitted it made 'the wrong call' after Solange Knowles called out the publication for airbrushing her braid out of the front cover.

Earlier this week the musician took to Instagram to express frustration that her architectural braided crown had been edited out of the final front splash – which promoted an interview in which she discussed the tradition and legacy of braiding.

The artist told the ES that braiding was an "act of beauty, an act of convenience and an act of tradition" before reposting the original unedited photo to her own social media account after the cover hit shelves.

She captioned the image ‘DTMH’ - an abbreviation of her own track Don’t Touch My Hair.

The magazine said decision to digitally alter the photo was taken for “layout” purposes, however it faced scrutiny online with Knowles' fans accusing it of racism for editing out a significant part of the star's cultural identity.

Angelica Bastien, the journalist behind the ES interview also disassociated herself from the feature in a series of tweets, claiming the title distorted her work.

Wayne Strickland 2017-09-27
img

Knight will be leaving at the end of October at which time the sponsorship and commercial content teams will report directly into Simon Daglish, deputy managing director of commercial, on an interim basis.

Asics Europe has hired two new faces to give its newly launched integrated marketing communications division a foot up against its rivals.

Robin Karakash joins the company in the newly-created role of director of integrated marketing communication EMEA.

Joining from Auto Trader, where he held the role of advertising director, Patel will be based in the London office as he leads the sales team in the UK.

In the new role, Pereira will be responsible for leading the brands marketing strategy as well as it's go-to-market initiatives.

Nick Sargent has been appointed as publishing director of British GQ, GQ Style and Wired Media Group.

Jose Wenger 2018-02-13
img

Recruiting and radicalising supporter online could soon become a thing of the past for the Islamic militant group.

Radicalising and recruiting members online could soon become a thing of the past for Isis as the UK government cracks down on propaganda.

New software developed by Home Office is able to detect 94% of Isis propaganda without the need for human verification.

Artificial Intelligence is capable of scanning millions of videos and audio files and has an accuracy rating of 99.99%.

At the current rate, human input would only be needed for one in every 20,000 suspicious files.

According to the Evening Standard, Isis uses 400 different sites to upload content to the Internet.

Anthony Sullivan 2017-10-20
img

One of the most annoying things about airports, aside from having to get there so early and the obscene cost of everything inside, is getting through security.

Or rather, the queue before you get to the machines.

Well as ever tech might help solve that problem, letting you go off and do some duty free shopping while someone scans your hand luggage.

The government has set aside £3 million for new research designed to help detect hidden explosives.

The aim is to speed up bag screening at airports, without compromising the high levels of security involved.

Proposals include portable versions of the tech that are capable of screening items in places other than regular security checkpoints, and systems that can scan laptops and tablets without them being removed from bags first.

James Lamb 2020-10-01
img

Prince Harry and Meghan have called for an end to structural racism in the UK, in an exclusive interview with the Evening Standard.

Harry told how he had become made more aware of the struggles people from Black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME) communities face since meeting Meghan. “I wasn’t aware of so many of the issues and so many of the problems within the UK and also globally as well,” he said. “I thought I did, but I didn’t.”

While it’s not about “pointing the finger” or blame, he added, there is a need for “learning” how we can do better.

“I think it is a really exciting time in British culture and British history, and in world culture,” he said. “This is a real moment that we should be grasping and actually celebrating. Because no one else has managed to do this before us.”

During the interview, the Duchess of Sussex was asked about her views on the Black Lives Matter protests, following the death of George Floyd. “When there is just peaceful protest and when there is the intention of just wanting community and just wanting the recognition of equality, then that is a beautiful thing,” she said. 

“It has been challenging for a lot of people, certainly, having to make this reckoning of historical significance that has got people to the place that they are. That is uncomfortable for people. We recognise that. It is uncomfortable for us.”

In a joint article for the Evening Standard, the couple write: “As long as structural racism exists, there will be generations of young people of colour who do not start their lives with the same equality of opportunity as their white peers. And for as long as that continues, untapped potential will never get to be realised.

“Therefore, now is the best time for us to be able to use our platform, and you use your platform as well, so we can actually start a conversation and introduce people to the Black community that are making a massive difference within their own communities and across the UK as a whole as well.”

The couple also spoke about family life, adding that their son Archie is “so good”. “We are very lucky with our little one,” she said. “He is just so busy, he is all over the place. He keeps us on our toes. We are just so lucky.”

To mark the beginning of Black History Month, the pair appeared on a Zoom call from their home in California and revealed their list of Black History Month “next gen trailblazers”.

People recognised for their contribution to British society included Vogue editor Edward Enninful, boxing champion Nicola Adams, and author Bernardine Evaristo.

Antonio Barron 2017-11-22
img

The Amazon Echo Show, the tech giant’s latest Alexa-enabled device complete with a 7-inch screen, launched last week in the U.K., with media companies like the BBC, The Telegraph and MTV adding video content to their audio skills.

Forty percent of U.K. households will have an Amazon Echo device by early next year, and 9 percent of households already do, according to research from Global and Radioplayer.

Yet the Echo Show, which retails at £199.99 in the U.K. and $230 in the U.S., is far from becoming a mainstream product, and monetization is mostly limited to sponsorship packages with brands.

The Telegraph’s editorial team picks five stories to run on its Echo Show daily bulletin, which can be updated throughout the day as further details unfold.

As Amazon made its Alexa personal assistant available on home sound system Sonos, the addition of the screen on the Echo Show signals Amazon is nearing further integration with smart TV manufacturers — or so publishers believe.

The Telegraph said it has significantly invested time, effort and resources to get video-centric skills ready for launch.

Paul Jennette 2017-12-07
img

Former chancellor George Osborne says Labour would be 20 points ahead in polls and “on the cusp of power” if Jeremy Corbyn were not leader.

The Evening Standard editor told a Commons press gallery lunch he believed the Islington MP remained the party’s biggest obstacle to winning an election - while lamenting the state of the Conservative government.

He said: “If the party was led by a more moderate social democrat, of even middling ability, they would now be 20 points ahead in the polls and on the cusp of power.

“Instead the Labour movement is consumed by an internal battle for its soul.”

He said the paper he now edits was giving “extensive coverage” to Labour councillor selection battles in London was because he believed the issue was of national importance.

“It’s not just a London story, it is a national story,” he said.

William Figueroa 2017-03-17
img

We just had to check it's not the first of April, because George Gideon Osborne – Cameron's Chancellor, sacked by May – has been declared the new Editor of London's Evening Standard.

“I am proud to have an editor of such substance, who reinforces the Standard’s standing and influence in London and whose political viewpoint – socially liberal and economically pragmatic – closely matches that of many of our readers.

George is London through and through and I am confident he is the right person to build on the fantastic legacy of Sarah Sands.”

In fairness, he attempted journalism before becoming an MP, but if being Gideon – son of Sir Peter George Osborne, 17th Baronet of Ballentaylor, and Felicity Loxton Peacock, daughter of artist Clarisse Loxton Peacock – a privately-educated Oxford graduate and a Bullingdon Club member is "London through and through" – well, that's a London I've never been to.

The City of London, maybe.

Frank Wilkerson 2018-01-05
img

I think I speak for all metropolitan liberal elites when I say how much I enjoy sitting on the train, slurping my soy flat white, browsing my Evening Standard and holding my phone horizontally whilst I talk to someone via my headphones.

Naturally, in the wake of this news, social media was once again awash with chatter of renationalising the railways, but that’s a stupid idea – and here’s why;

It’s an accepted truth that trains in the UK are pretty crap.

Of course, there is a case for saying that nationalisation would alleviate some of the direct financial burden of train travel, you only have to look at rail services across Europe to see that, but that doesn’t mean it would provide a better service.

Let’s assume for argument’s sake that the increase in tax subsidy would lessen the overall cost from what it is now, it would still not be an improvement of service.

You only have to look at Italy’s Trenitalia to know how cushy the services are here compared, unless of course, you enjoy damp, battered carriages with door hinges likely to lacerate you.

Michael Fewell 2017-06-26
img

Bundles of future chip wrappers allegedly nabbed from London rail station

Two men have been charged with theft for allegedly helping themselves to bundles of free newspapers from London Bridge railway station.

The two South London men are said to have pinched bundles of the London Evening Standard, a freesheet, edited by former Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, that is handed out to commuters on weekdays.

Marcel Javier Larezserrano, 35, of Thurland House Manor Estate in the London Borough of Southwark, and Jhon Mejia, 30, of Hampson Way, Lambeth, are each charged with one count of theft, contrary to section 1 of the Theft Act 1968.

Larezserrano and Mejia are due to appear before Central London Magistrates’ Court this afternoon to answer the charges.

Theft is punishable within England and Wales with up to seven years’ imprisonment if charged on indictment.

George Summers 2021-05-25
img
UK clubbers return to the dance floor as nightclub Circus hosts the first dance event.

Large events like club nights and gigs look likely to go ahead come summer, after a series of pilot events by the government involving 58,000 people resulted in just 15 positive cases of Covid-19.

Since April, the Events Research Programme (ERP) has analysed the Covid risk of several large-scale indoor and outdoor events, including the Brit Awards, the FA Cup Final and a club night in Liverpool.

The events tested a range of interventions – such as altering the layout of the venue, face coverings and ventilation – and all attendees took Covid tests before and after the event.

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden said the events were a “real success” in an interview with the Evening Standard and hopes that by June 21 stadiums will be full and the lights will be back on in the West End.

The indoor gig

The Brit Awards took place on May 11 as part of the government’s live events pilot scheme and was the first large-scale indoor music event of the year.

The ceremony, which included performances by Dua Lipa and Sir Elton John, featured an audience of 4,000 people at the O2 Arena.

No cases emerged from the event where audience members were not socially distanced or required to wear face coverings once seated.

A snooker tournament

Crowds at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield were increased as the snooker tournament progressed, culminating in a full house for the final on May 2 and 3.

Four cases of Covid occurred across the 17 days of the championships.

The outdoor gig

Around 5,000 people packed into Sefton Park in Liverpool earlier this month for an outdoor gig, which included performances from Blossoms, The Lathums and local singer-songwriter Zuzu. 

Two cases were recorded after the event. 

A football match

The FA Cup semi-final between Leicester and Southampton at Wembley on April 18 was the first outdoor sports event to welcome back spectators, though it was limited to residents and key workers living near the stadium.

There have been no cases reported from Wembley.

A night clubbing

Club night Circus hosted The First Dance in Liverpool, where revellers, who all had to produce negative lateral flow tests, did not have to wear face coverings or socially distance.

Nine cases were found among 6,000 clubbers across two nights.

A Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport spokesperson said the mass event figures are based on what has been seen “so far” and further data needs to be collected on other events. They said a full report will be presented to the prime minister on a date to be confirmed.