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Brett Ames 2016-11-09
img

Baffling coded announcements on transport systems often have us wondering what they really mean, and now we know.

Lists have been compiled and, rather appropriately, a call out for someone to deal with a "code two" on the Underground means it's time for some unlucky cleaner to fetch the bucket and wipe someone's toilet off the platform, seats or stairs.

The list doing the rounds right now contains a complete dictionary of Underground cleaning announcement codes, such as:

Code 5 - Broken Glass

Code 7 - Miscellaneous things or unidentified seepages.

So now you know and can be happy it's not your job to bring the wheelie bucket down the stairs.

collect
0
Carl Fox 2017-03-09
img

It’s 5.30pm and rush hour is in full swing on the London Underground.

As we pile onto the escalator, battle to be one of the lucky few to get on the approaching train, and concertina ourselves into any small available space in the carriage, it’s hard to comprehend that this was once a first-class service.

When built in the 1800s, the London underground network was a world-first; an icon of innovative design and out-of-the-box thinking.

But now serving 1.34 billion annual passengers - a figure which is growing every year - the service is under unprecedented strain.

This situation has been building for years, but has now reached critical level.

Population growth and rapid urbanisation are putting more pressure on our cities than ever before and infrastructure that we have relied on for decades is becoming overwhelmed and unfit for purpose.

collect
0
Efrain Johnson 2017-08-28
img

It must be summer in London at last.

Time to stroll through Hyde Park, stop for a drink at one of the capital’s countless drinking establishments… and then risk death by melting, by stepping on to an unbearably warm Tube.

So as any Londoner will tell you, this means that it can get really, really hot.

A couple of years ago our pals at the excellent CityMetric assessed the below map, which was released by TfL.

It shows the tunnelled part of the Tube network, coloured by how warm it gets.

But today, thanks to a freedom of information request we’ve got the actual data - and more recent, up-to-date, data on tube temperatures.

collect
0
Charles Pete 2016-09-06
img

A quite amazingly brave and tireless little signal box that should be the star of a series of books has finally retired, with the piece of kit inside Edgware Road station at last being allowed to have a rest and a sit down in a museum.

First installed in 1926, the Edgware Road station box organised trains on the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines.

It's such a brave little collection of wires and levers that it's been designated an item of national historic interest by the Railway Heritage Designation Board, meaning that hundreds of men with an interest in transport will be looking at it from now on.

It was past its use-by date though.

The new digital replacement should allow trains to travel closer to each other, with the aim being to increase the number of trains running on the two lines by 33 per cent by the start of the next decade.

London Underground heritage manager Mike Ashworth said: "This unique signalling cabin harks back to the earliest days of London's transport network, being originally built and used by the Metropolitan Railway in 1926.

collect
0
Brendon Dwelle 2016-10-05
img

A full-time japester has carried out a rather cruel prank of sorts on the London Underground, releasing a tarantula on a busy carriage and filming people s reactions.

The poor sods in the fleeing crowd all manage to avoid treading on the hairy beast and, even more surprisingly, nobody lamps the guy behind the camera -- who at one point tries to convince everyone that it s remote-controlled -- that clearly set the whole thing up.

On the scale of terror, we'd place it somewhere between 'Tube Chat?'

collect
0
Mattie Wright 2016-08-25
img

The rhythmic throbbing of North Greenwich's trains could be this year's protest Christmas number one, were enough people to get behind it, as the captivating swooshing of trains, opening of doors and warnings of the destruction of unattended baggage is part of The Next Station -- an audio tour around the London Underground.

55 stations are included in the scheme, with their sounds recorded, processed and remixed, then stuck 0n the internet as the London Underground sound map.

Over 100 people contributed recordings, ranging from platform sound to the chit-chat of ticket halls.

It's just like being there, but without sweating so much and there being piss everywhere.

The man who did Old Street turned it into quite the ambient work of art, adding music atop the sounds, although many stations are only represented by their unedited natural recordings.

Covent Garden even got a Klingon in as some sort of nod to the city's ethnic diversity.

collect
0
Cornelius Jones 2017-05-25
img

p TfL has reported that accidents on the London Underground are up 11% on 2015, with nearly 5000 reported incidents.

The one bright spot is that customers seem to be falling into the gap less, with 282 people not heeding the words of the intercom - down from 293 in 2015.

Baker Street is the worst offender in these gap-related incidents, claiming 62 of the total.

As TFL announced the numbers there were the usual dreary demands from politicians to make things safer and ensure that the Underground is the safest subterranean transit system in the world.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents took the award, as usual, for stating the bleeding obvious saying TFL had a "duty of care" to passengers.

TFL is, presumably, well aware of that fact.

collect
0
James Hammond 2016-11-28

The London Tube Quiz app has 120 cryptic puzzles designed to test your knowledge of the London Underground.

The app is available on iOS and Android

collect
0
Vivian Matthews 2016-08-25
img

The rhythmic throbbing of North Greenwich's trains could be this year's protest Christmas number one, were enough people to get behind it, as the captivating swooshing of trains, opening of doors and warnings of the destruction of unattended baggage is part of The Next Station -- an audio tour around the London Underground.

55 stations are included in the scheme, with their sounds recorded, processed and remixed, then stuck 0n the internet as the London Underground sound map.

Over 100 people contributed recordings, ranging from platform sound to the chit-chat of ticket halls.

It's just like being there, but without sweating so much and there being piss everywhere.

The man who did Old Street turned it into quite the ambient work of art, adding music atop the sounds, although many stations are only represented by their unedited natural recordings.

Covent Garden even got a Klingon in as some sort of nod to the city's ethnic diversity.

collect
0
Raymond Powers 2016-11-09
img

Baffling coded announcements on transport systems often have us wondering what they really mean, and now we know.

Lists have been compiled and, rather appropriately, a call out for someone to deal with a "code two" on the Underground means it's time for some unlucky cleaner to fetch the bucket and wipe someone's toilet off the platform, seats or stairs.

The list doing the rounds right now contains a complete dictionary of Underground cleaning announcement codes, such as:

Code 5 - Broken Glass

Code 7 - Miscellaneous things or unidentified seepages.

So now you know and can be happy it's not your job to bring the wheelie bucket down the stairs.

collect
0
Scott Mayle 2017-04-18
img

Everyone hates when tube stations have to close, but usually we understand if it's something serious like a security alert or an injury.

Sometimes, however, the reason we're kicked out of the tube is that someone's burnt their breakfast.

London Assembly member Tony Devenish sent a Freedom of Information request to find out all the non-emergency reasons tube stations in three boroughs were closed, which the Evening Standard reports affected stations in those areas for more than 200 days in the last three years.

While the biggest reasons for non-security-related closures were strikes and staff shortages, burnt toast caused three of them, including mega-busy Oxford Circus and Victoria stations.

This means hundreds of people were inconvenienced because someone can't work the dial on a toaster.

Similarly, Edgware Road was shut because a staff member was vaping in the mess room and set off the alarm.

collect
0
Stuart Smith 2016-07-22
img

We all know that Londoners are a sensitive bunch, all too ready to kick off about pretty much anything, but the Underground has been a sweaty, stifling pit this week, thanks to a collar-wilting cocktail of cracking weather, a lack of air conditioning and the bodily heat of tens of thousands of commuters.

Londonist has gone through TfL s data for average peak hour temperatures on platforms across the Tube network from August 2015 and found that the hottest of the lot is at Marble Arch on the Central line, coming in at an underwear-soaking 31.69 C.

Bond Street, 31.48 C, Central line

Paddington, 31.19 C, Bakerloo line

Oxford Circus, 31 C, Central line

Bank, 30.99 C, Central line

collect
0
James Baichan 2016-07-22
img

We all know that Londoners are a sensitive bunch, all too ready to kick off about pretty much anything, but the Underground has been a sweaty, stifling pit this week, thanks to a collar-wilting cocktail of cracking weather, a lack of air conditioning and the bodily heat of tens of thousands of commuters.

Londonist has gone through TfL s data for average peak hour temperatures on platforms across the Tube network from August 2015 and found that the hottest of the lot is at Marble Arch on the Central line, coming in at an underwear-soaking 31.69 C.

Bond Street, 31.48 C, Central line

Paddington, 31.19 C, Bakerloo line

Oxford Circus, 31 C, Central line

Bank, 30.99 C, Central line

collect
0
Thomas Gibson 2017-09-29
img

People in Scotland will be saddened to hear that Londoners are to be mildly inconvenienced on their way to and from work next Thursday, as the Tube network is likely to be taken completely offline by striking drivers.

Someone please pass me a tissue.

The 24-hour strike on Thursday, October 5, by train drivers represented by the Aslef union, will no doubt also make the busses hellish places to be as well, unless you live in Wales or Cornwall, where they will be operating with just one old lady on-board who didn't even pay as usual and isn't really even going anywhere.

And there's even worse news for people in the big smelly town, as there's an England v Slovenia football match on at Wembley in the evening too, meaning that Londoners AND football fans are both likely to suffer.

All Scottish people are currently on one knee in solidarity with their brothers in London.

Good luck getting to work next week, you brave little soldiers in your tight trousers and white canvas plimsolls.

collect
0
Nicolas Yeager 2016-09-29
img

London s commuters were plunged into terror this week as a shadowy organisation attempted to turn decades of convention on its head by encouraging people to talk to one another.

It s over 140 years since the capital s inhabitants first learned to keep their gobs shut on underground trains or face the prospect of social approbation and, possibly, asphyxiation.

Even when travelling the whole soul-grinding length of the Northern Line, etiquette demands not even the slightest acknowledgement of anyone else in the carriage.

Unless there's an actual bona fide air raid going on outside, in which case singing is permitted.

Now as if the replacement of proper boozers with coffee shops, Apple s takeover of Battersea Power Station, and "Shoreditch" wasn t enough, someone has started distributing badges with the slogan Tube Chat?

Together with the badges, the instigators of this ludicrous attempt to encourage loquacity amongst Londoners are distributing cards telling people they would benefit from a daily chat .

collect
0
Evelyn Fowler 2016-05-23
img

TfL s having a party, so bring your booze books and your char-ming selves down to your local Underground station if it s on the Central or Victoria line on the evening of August 19th.

Yes, almost 12 months after it was originally supposed to get going, the 24-hour Tube service is actually going to creak into action.

First to get the all-night treatment will be the Central and Victoria lines, with the Piccadilly, Jubilee and Northern to follow in the autumn.

Pissed-up boozehounds will be able to catch six trains per hour between 00.30 and 05.30 when the Friday and Saturday night service arrives, though this will be increased to eight per hour on the notoriously sardine-tin-like Northern line.

I have made getting the Night Tube up and running a priority, and London Underground has now confirmed that services on the first two lines will launch on 19 August, said new Mayor of London Sadiq Khan.

The Night Tube is absolutely vital to my plans to support and grow London s night time economy - creating more jobs and opportunities for all Londoners.

collect
0
Brett Ames 2016-11-09
img

Baffling coded announcements on transport systems often have us wondering what they really mean, and now we know.

Lists have been compiled and, rather appropriately, a call out for someone to deal with a "code two" on the Underground means it's time for some unlucky cleaner to fetch the bucket and wipe someone's toilet off the platform, seats or stairs.

The list doing the rounds right now contains a complete dictionary of Underground cleaning announcement codes, such as:

Code 5 - Broken Glass

Code 7 - Miscellaneous things or unidentified seepages.

So now you know and can be happy it's not your job to bring the wheelie bucket down the stairs.

Efrain Johnson 2017-08-28
img

It must be summer in London at last.

Time to stroll through Hyde Park, stop for a drink at one of the capital’s countless drinking establishments… and then risk death by melting, by stepping on to an unbearably warm Tube.

So as any Londoner will tell you, this means that it can get really, really hot.

A couple of years ago our pals at the excellent CityMetric assessed the below map, which was released by TfL.

It shows the tunnelled part of the Tube network, coloured by how warm it gets.

But today, thanks to a freedom of information request we’ve got the actual data - and more recent, up-to-date, data on tube temperatures.

Brendon Dwelle 2016-10-05
img

A full-time japester has carried out a rather cruel prank of sorts on the London Underground, releasing a tarantula on a busy carriage and filming people s reactions.

The poor sods in the fleeing crowd all manage to avoid treading on the hairy beast and, even more surprisingly, nobody lamps the guy behind the camera -- who at one point tries to convince everyone that it s remote-controlled -- that clearly set the whole thing up.

On the scale of terror, we'd place it somewhere between 'Tube Chat?'

Cornelius Jones 2017-05-25
img

p TfL has reported that accidents on the London Underground are up 11% on 2015, with nearly 5000 reported incidents.

The one bright spot is that customers seem to be falling into the gap less, with 282 people not heeding the words of the intercom - down from 293 in 2015.

Baker Street is the worst offender in these gap-related incidents, claiming 62 of the total.

As TFL announced the numbers there were the usual dreary demands from politicians to make things safer and ensure that the Underground is the safest subterranean transit system in the world.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents took the award, as usual, for stating the bleeding obvious saying TFL had a "duty of care" to passengers.

TFL is, presumably, well aware of that fact.

Vivian Matthews 2016-08-25
img

The rhythmic throbbing of North Greenwich's trains could be this year's protest Christmas number one, were enough people to get behind it, as the captivating swooshing of trains, opening of doors and warnings of the destruction of unattended baggage is part of The Next Station -- an audio tour around the London Underground.

55 stations are included in the scheme, with their sounds recorded, processed and remixed, then stuck 0n the internet as the London Underground sound map.

Over 100 people contributed recordings, ranging from platform sound to the chit-chat of ticket halls.

It's just like being there, but without sweating so much and there being piss everywhere.

The man who did Old Street turned it into quite the ambient work of art, adding music atop the sounds, although many stations are only represented by their unedited natural recordings.

Covent Garden even got a Klingon in as some sort of nod to the city's ethnic diversity.

Scott Mayle 2017-04-18
img

Everyone hates when tube stations have to close, but usually we understand if it's something serious like a security alert or an injury.

Sometimes, however, the reason we're kicked out of the tube is that someone's burnt their breakfast.

London Assembly member Tony Devenish sent a Freedom of Information request to find out all the non-emergency reasons tube stations in three boroughs were closed, which the Evening Standard reports affected stations in those areas for more than 200 days in the last three years.

While the biggest reasons for non-security-related closures were strikes and staff shortages, burnt toast caused three of them, including mega-busy Oxford Circus and Victoria stations.

This means hundreds of people were inconvenienced because someone can't work the dial on a toaster.

Similarly, Edgware Road was shut because a staff member was vaping in the mess room and set off the alarm.

James Baichan 2016-07-22
img

We all know that Londoners are a sensitive bunch, all too ready to kick off about pretty much anything, but the Underground has been a sweaty, stifling pit this week, thanks to a collar-wilting cocktail of cracking weather, a lack of air conditioning and the bodily heat of tens of thousands of commuters.

Londonist has gone through TfL s data for average peak hour temperatures on platforms across the Tube network from August 2015 and found that the hottest of the lot is at Marble Arch on the Central line, coming in at an underwear-soaking 31.69 C.

Bond Street, 31.48 C, Central line

Paddington, 31.19 C, Bakerloo line

Oxford Circus, 31 C, Central line

Bank, 30.99 C, Central line

Nicolas Yeager 2016-09-29
img

London s commuters were plunged into terror this week as a shadowy organisation attempted to turn decades of convention on its head by encouraging people to talk to one another.

It s over 140 years since the capital s inhabitants first learned to keep their gobs shut on underground trains or face the prospect of social approbation and, possibly, asphyxiation.

Even when travelling the whole soul-grinding length of the Northern Line, etiquette demands not even the slightest acknowledgement of anyone else in the carriage.

Unless there's an actual bona fide air raid going on outside, in which case singing is permitted.

Now as if the replacement of proper boozers with coffee shops, Apple s takeover of Battersea Power Station, and "Shoreditch" wasn t enough, someone has started distributing badges with the slogan Tube Chat?

Together with the badges, the instigators of this ludicrous attempt to encourage loquacity amongst Londoners are distributing cards telling people they would benefit from a daily chat .

Carl Fox 2017-03-09
img

It’s 5.30pm and rush hour is in full swing on the London Underground.

As we pile onto the escalator, battle to be one of the lucky few to get on the approaching train, and concertina ourselves into any small available space in the carriage, it’s hard to comprehend that this was once a first-class service.

When built in the 1800s, the London underground network was a world-first; an icon of innovative design and out-of-the-box thinking.

But now serving 1.34 billion annual passengers - a figure which is growing every year - the service is under unprecedented strain.

This situation has been building for years, but has now reached critical level.

Population growth and rapid urbanisation are putting more pressure on our cities than ever before and infrastructure that we have relied on for decades is becoming overwhelmed and unfit for purpose.

Charles Pete 2016-09-06
img

A quite amazingly brave and tireless little signal box that should be the star of a series of books has finally retired, with the piece of kit inside Edgware Road station at last being allowed to have a rest and a sit down in a museum.

First installed in 1926, the Edgware Road station box organised trains on the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines.

It's such a brave little collection of wires and levers that it's been designated an item of national historic interest by the Railway Heritage Designation Board, meaning that hundreds of men with an interest in transport will be looking at it from now on.

It was past its use-by date though.

The new digital replacement should allow trains to travel closer to each other, with the aim being to increase the number of trains running on the two lines by 33 per cent by the start of the next decade.

London Underground heritage manager Mike Ashworth said: "This unique signalling cabin harks back to the earliest days of London's transport network, being originally built and used by the Metropolitan Railway in 1926.

Mattie Wright 2016-08-25
img

The rhythmic throbbing of North Greenwich's trains could be this year's protest Christmas number one, were enough people to get behind it, as the captivating swooshing of trains, opening of doors and warnings of the destruction of unattended baggage is part of The Next Station -- an audio tour around the London Underground.

55 stations are included in the scheme, with their sounds recorded, processed and remixed, then stuck 0n the internet as the London Underground sound map.

Over 100 people contributed recordings, ranging from platform sound to the chit-chat of ticket halls.

It's just like being there, but without sweating so much and there being piss everywhere.

The man who did Old Street turned it into quite the ambient work of art, adding music atop the sounds, although many stations are only represented by their unedited natural recordings.

Covent Garden even got a Klingon in as some sort of nod to the city's ethnic diversity.

James Hammond 2016-11-28

The London Tube Quiz app has 120 cryptic puzzles designed to test your knowledge of the London Underground.

The app is available on iOS and Android

Raymond Powers 2016-11-09
img

Baffling coded announcements on transport systems often have us wondering what they really mean, and now we know.

Lists have been compiled and, rather appropriately, a call out for someone to deal with a "code two" on the Underground means it's time for some unlucky cleaner to fetch the bucket and wipe someone's toilet off the platform, seats or stairs.

The list doing the rounds right now contains a complete dictionary of Underground cleaning announcement codes, such as:

Code 5 - Broken Glass

Code 7 - Miscellaneous things or unidentified seepages.

So now you know and can be happy it's not your job to bring the wheelie bucket down the stairs.

Stuart Smith 2016-07-22
img

We all know that Londoners are a sensitive bunch, all too ready to kick off about pretty much anything, but the Underground has been a sweaty, stifling pit this week, thanks to a collar-wilting cocktail of cracking weather, a lack of air conditioning and the bodily heat of tens of thousands of commuters.

Londonist has gone through TfL s data for average peak hour temperatures on platforms across the Tube network from August 2015 and found that the hottest of the lot is at Marble Arch on the Central line, coming in at an underwear-soaking 31.69 C.

Bond Street, 31.48 C, Central line

Paddington, 31.19 C, Bakerloo line

Oxford Circus, 31 C, Central line

Bank, 30.99 C, Central line

Thomas Gibson 2017-09-29
img

People in Scotland will be saddened to hear that Londoners are to be mildly inconvenienced on their way to and from work next Thursday, as the Tube network is likely to be taken completely offline by striking drivers.

Someone please pass me a tissue.

The 24-hour strike on Thursday, October 5, by train drivers represented by the Aslef union, will no doubt also make the busses hellish places to be as well, unless you live in Wales or Cornwall, where they will be operating with just one old lady on-board who didn't even pay as usual and isn't really even going anywhere.

And there's even worse news for people in the big smelly town, as there's an England v Slovenia football match on at Wembley in the evening too, meaning that Londoners AND football fans are both likely to suffer.

All Scottish people are currently on one knee in solidarity with their brothers in London.

Good luck getting to work next week, you brave little soldiers in your tight trousers and white canvas plimsolls.

Evelyn Fowler 2016-05-23
img

TfL s having a party, so bring your booze books and your char-ming selves down to your local Underground station if it s on the Central or Victoria line on the evening of August 19th.

Yes, almost 12 months after it was originally supposed to get going, the 24-hour Tube service is actually going to creak into action.

First to get the all-night treatment will be the Central and Victoria lines, with the Piccadilly, Jubilee and Northern to follow in the autumn.

Pissed-up boozehounds will be able to catch six trains per hour between 00.30 and 05.30 when the Friday and Saturday night service arrives, though this will be increased to eight per hour on the notoriously sardine-tin-like Northern line.

I have made getting the Night Tube up and running a priority, and London Underground has now confirmed that services on the first two lines will launch on 19 August, said new Mayor of London Sadiq Khan.

The Night Tube is absolutely vital to my plans to support and grow London s night time economy - creating more jobs and opportunities for all Londoners.