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Dion Esparza 2016-07-19
img

GIF M. volans, similar to the spiders discovered in Western Australia.

Most people wouldn t describe spiders as beautiful.

But have you ever seen a peacock spider?

Scientists just found seven new species of these exotic, multi-colored arachnids.

Australian scientist Jürgen Otto, known on YouTube as Peacockspiderman, found all seven species along the coast of Western Australia with help of Australian naturalist David Knowles and American spider expert David Hill.

Although these species are only 4mm in size, they still have the same dazzling color display as other creatures that share the Maratus genus.

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Eric Whitefield 2018-01-02
img

Brightly colored Australian peacock spiders (Maratus spp.)

captivate even the most arachnophobic viewers with their flamboyant courtship displays featuring diverse and intricate body colorations, patterns, and movements - all packed into miniature bodies measuring less than 5 mm in size for many species.

However, these displays aren't just pretty to look at, they also inspire new ways for humans to produce color in technology.

This is the first known instance in nature of males using an entire rainbow of colors to entice females to mate.

But how do males make their rainbows?

Figuring out the answer was inherently interdisciplinary so Dr. Bor-Kai Hsiung - now a postdoctoral scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego - assembled a team that included biologists, physicists and engineers while he was a Ph.D. student at The University of Akron's (UA) Integrated Bioscience Ph.D. program under the mentorship of Dr. Todd Blackledge and Dr. Matthew Shawkey (now at University of Ghent), and supported by UA's Biomimicry Research and Innovation Center.

collect
0
Dion Esparza 2016-07-19
img

GIF M. volans, similar to the spiders discovered in Western Australia.

Most people wouldn t describe spiders as beautiful.

But have you ever seen a peacock spider?

Scientists just found seven new species of these exotic, multi-colored arachnids.

Australian scientist Jürgen Otto, known on YouTube as Peacockspiderman, found all seven species along the coast of Western Australia with help of Australian naturalist David Knowles and American spider expert David Hill.

Although these species are only 4mm in size, they still have the same dazzling color display as other creatures that share the Maratus genus.

Eric Whitefield 2018-01-02
img

Brightly colored Australian peacock spiders (Maratus spp.)

captivate even the most arachnophobic viewers with their flamboyant courtship displays featuring diverse and intricate body colorations, patterns, and movements - all packed into miniature bodies measuring less than 5 mm in size for many species.

However, these displays aren't just pretty to look at, they also inspire new ways for humans to produce color in technology.

This is the first known instance in nature of males using an entire rainbow of colors to entice females to mate.

But how do males make their rainbows?

Figuring out the answer was inherently interdisciplinary so Dr. Bor-Kai Hsiung - now a postdoctoral scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego - assembled a team that included biologists, physicists and engineers while he was a Ph.D. student at The University of Akron's (UA) Integrated Bioscience Ph.D. program under the mentorship of Dr. Todd Blackledge and Dr. Matthew Shawkey (now at University of Ghent), and supported by UA's Biomimicry Research and Innovation Center.