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Madeleine Vogel 2018-08-19
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Netflix has been extremely successful in recent years with its original series and movies, but one category it continues to struggle with is the talk show format.

The streaming network has been experimenting with several shows, starting out with the Chelsea Handler-hosted Chelsea and more recently getting Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, but two other new series have been cancelled after brief runs.

Both The Break With Michelle Wolf and The Joel McHale Show With Joel McHale have been given the axe after a single season.

The Joel McHale Show debuted in February, while The Break just premiered in May, however neither show brought in enough viewers for Netflix to let them continue, notes Hollywood Reporter.

The comedy shows had promise, with Wolf as a rising star following her hosting duties at the 2018 White House Correspondents Dinner where she heavily roasted the Trump administration.

Likewise, McHale was well-known for his part on Community, and his Netflix show was almost an exact replica of his previous hosting gig on E’s The Soup.

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Bryan White 2018-12-26
img

I recently watched a stand-up show in which comedian Michelle Wolf made a cunning observation: “It’s our fault we’re not further along in period technology, because we’re ok that our best solution is a rolled-up piece of cotton.”

Whether it really is women’s fault is debatable, but she does make a valid point.

You would assume for a problem that affects half of the world’s population every month, we would have come up with something a little more innovative by now.

Increasingly however, women are not “ok with it.”

The last few years have seen a staggering increase in start-ups using technology to cater to female health concerns, from period tracking to fertility solutions.

Currently, 21 percent of female-founded companies are in the health sphere, a market that is predicted to grow to $50 billion by 2025.

collect
0
Michael Nicewander 2018-03-22
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Seth Rogen is getting a little help from his friends for his upcoming Netflix comedy special, Hilarity for Charity.

A variety show, Rogen’s special will deliver laughs through stand-up, sketches, and music, courtesy of numerous big names in comedy, such as Sacha Baron Cohen and Sarah Silverman.

Rogen unveiled his all-star lineup in a video announcement released by Netflix on Thursday, March 22.

The comedian appears in the video alone, pretending to be surprised that his fellow performers aren’t on hand to help share the news.

Left to his own devices, Rogen announces the list himself, switching things up to keep them interesting.

However, the lineup is so strong that viewers don’t need any bells and whistles.

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0
Richard Baty 2018-10-30
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"Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj" is Netflix's latest foray into talk-show territory, and a social-media analysis from Crimson Hexagon suggests it has a shot at success.

Netflix's other talk shows, such as "The Break with Michelle Wolf," have been canceled.

But Crimson Hexagon found that people talked more about and had a more positive reaction to "Patriot Act" when it premiered compared to the other shows.

"Patriot Act" is similar to HBO's "Last Week Tonight" in that Minhaj focuses on a single issue each episode, and critics have praised the host's humor and unique perspective.

"Patriot Act" debuted on Netflix with two episodes on October 28, and will be dropped on a weekly basis.

Topical shows have proven to be a challenge for Netflix, as they break its usual strategy of dropping all episodes at once for users to binge at their leisure.

collect
0
Gerardo Diaz 2018-10-05
img

After canceling two late-night-themed shows in August—The Break With Michelle Wolf and The Joel McHale Show With Joel McHale—Netflix is ready to take another stab at the genre.

On Oct. 28, it will debut Patriot Act With Hasan Minhaj, a weekly comedy show hosted by former Daily Show correspondent Hasan Minhaj.

In a new promo for the series, Minhaj pokes fun at his post-Daily Show career, the logline for his new show and government surveillance.

The spot opens as Minhaj is texting with his dad, who asks him if he needs money “because you got fired from the Daily Show.” Minhaj says he didn’t get fired, but his dad doesn’t believe him.

The promo then reveals that Minhaj is being monitored by government officials, who are tracking his texts and emails as they discuss his new show, Patriot Act.

“It explores the modern geopolitical and cultural landscape through a comedic lens,” explains one person, prompting another to respond.

collect
0
William Mcneely 2018-05-01
img

Yet, a quick glance at social media over the past few days would suggest that political commentators have watched few, if any, of them.

Over the weekend, comedian Michelle Wolf hosted the White House Correspondents’ Dinner with a scathing routine that targeted Trump and his administration, with copious barbs reserved for other conservatives, Congress at large, and the media itself.

In one of her jokes, Wolf compared White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to Aunt Lydia, a brutal enabler of the fascist, anti-woman regime in The Handmaid’s Tale, and joked about how resourceful she is: “She burns facts, and then she uses that ash to create a perfect smoky eye.”

Beyond the inevitable outrage from conservatives about Wolf being disrespectful to the sensitive, innocent flower that is President Trump, came an even odder reaction: the idea that Wolf had attacked Sanders for her “physical appearance.” Many on Twitter — including Wolf, who noted “all these jokes were about her despicable behavior” — were baffled by this interpretation.

Sanders certainly took some body blows, but trying to find the affront to her looks felt like squinting at a magic eye poster, waiting for the insult to pop out and seeing nothing but ruthless attacks on her character.

The blowback was so bizarrely out of sync with Wolf’s jokes (and reality) that it’s hard not to wonder: do the people getting heated about this… know what a smoky eye is?

collect
0
Frances Buoy 2020-08-18
img

patriot act netflix

  • Netflix has canceled its variety talk series "Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj" after two years.
  • It follows other variety talk shows the streamer has canceled, like "The Break with Michelle Wolf" and "The Joel McHale Show."
  • Netflix's reality TV boss, Brandon Riegg, told The New York Times last year that the genre was "a challenge for us as an on-demand service."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Netflix has canceled "Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj" after two years. It's the latest variety talk series on the streaming giant to get the ax.

Similar to HBO's "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver," each episode tackled a different newsworthy topic. Episodes were released weekly, a deviation from Netflix's usual strategy of dropping entire seasons at once, but in line with its strategy for other variety talk shows.

Minhaj made the announcement on Twitter on Tuesday: "What a run. @patriotact has come to an end. I got to work with the best writers, producers, researchers, and animators in the game. My 2 babies were born and grew up with the show. TY to @Netflix and everyone who watched."

Netflix has struggled with the variety talk genre. It had previously canceled shows like "Chelsea," "The Break with Michelle Wolf," and "The Joel McHale Show." Each lasted only one or two seasons. 

When it first debuted, "Patriot Act" seemed like it would be the variety series to go the distance for Netflix. When it premiered in 2018, consumer-insights company Crimson Hexagon found that "Patriot Act" was talked about more and better received in online conversations.

The show was a critical hit, as well, with the first season gaining a 100% Rotten Tomatoes critic score.

"[It] doesn't run away from political comedy convention while also aiming for something just different enough to make it stand apart," Variety wrote about season one.

Two other Netflix variety talk shows, "The Fix" and "Norm Macdonald Has a Show," haven't been formally canceled, but have only aired one season each since debuting in 2018. David Letterman's "My Next Guest Needs No Introduction" has fared better, but is on an irregular release schedule.

In a statement to a New York Times piece last year with the headline "Netflix Has a Talk Show Problem," Netflix's reality TV boss, Brandon Riegg, admitted that variety talk shows were a challenge for the streamer.

"The timeliness of the genre is a challenge for us as an on-demand service," Riegg said. "We've worked with many talented artists to pioneer talk shows for streaming audiences, and although some shows ended, we hope everyone involved is proud of what they created."

SEE ALSO: Major movie-theater chains like AMC and Regal are reopening this week, but a new survey suggests only a small fraction of US consumers are ready to return

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet

collect
0
Madeleine Vogel 2018-08-19
img

Netflix has been extremely successful in recent years with its original series and movies, but one category it continues to struggle with is the talk show format.

The streaming network has been experimenting with several shows, starting out with the Chelsea Handler-hosted Chelsea and more recently getting Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, but two other new series have been cancelled after brief runs.

Both The Break With Michelle Wolf and The Joel McHale Show With Joel McHale have been given the axe after a single season.

The Joel McHale Show debuted in February, while The Break just premiered in May, however neither show brought in enough viewers for Netflix to let them continue, notes Hollywood Reporter.

The comedy shows had promise, with Wolf as a rising star following her hosting duties at the 2018 White House Correspondents Dinner where she heavily roasted the Trump administration.

Likewise, McHale was well-known for his part on Community, and his Netflix show was almost an exact replica of his previous hosting gig on E’s The Soup.

Michael Nicewander 2018-03-22
img

Seth Rogen is getting a little help from his friends for his upcoming Netflix comedy special, Hilarity for Charity.

A variety show, Rogen’s special will deliver laughs through stand-up, sketches, and music, courtesy of numerous big names in comedy, such as Sacha Baron Cohen and Sarah Silverman.

Rogen unveiled his all-star lineup in a video announcement released by Netflix on Thursday, March 22.

The comedian appears in the video alone, pretending to be surprised that his fellow performers aren’t on hand to help share the news.

Left to his own devices, Rogen announces the list himself, switching things up to keep them interesting.

However, the lineup is so strong that viewers don’t need any bells and whistles.

Gerardo Diaz 2018-10-05
img

After canceling two late-night-themed shows in August—The Break With Michelle Wolf and The Joel McHale Show With Joel McHale—Netflix is ready to take another stab at the genre.

On Oct. 28, it will debut Patriot Act With Hasan Minhaj, a weekly comedy show hosted by former Daily Show correspondent Hasan Minhaj.

In a new promo for the series, Minhaj pokes fun at his post-Daily Show career, the logline for his new show and government surveillance.

The spot opens as Minhaj is texting with his dad, who asks him if he needs money “because you got fired from the Daily Show.” Minhaj says he didn’t get fired, but his dad doesn’t believe him.

The promo then reveals that Minhaj is being monitored by government officials, who are tracking his texts and emails as they discuss his new show, Patriot Act.

“It explores the modern geopolitical and cultural landscape through a comedic lens,” explains one person, prompting another to respond.

Frances Buoy 2020-08-18
img

patriot act netflix

  • Netflix has canceled its variety talk series "Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj" after two years.
  • It follows other variety talk shows the streamer has canceled, like "The Break with Michelle Wolf" and "The Joel McHale Show."
  • Netflix's reality TV boss, Brandon Riegg, told The New York Times last year that the genre was "a challenge for us as an on-demand service."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Netflix has canceled "Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj" after two years. It's the latest variety talk series on the streaming giant to get the ax.

Similar to HBO's "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver," each episode tackled a different newsworthy topic. Episodes were released weekly, a deviation from Netflix's usual strategy of dropping entire seasons at once, but in line with its strategy for other variety talk shows.

Minhaj made the announcement on Twitter on Tuesday: "What a run. @patriotact has come to an end. I got to work with the best writers, producers, researchers, and animators in the game. My 2 babies were born and grew up with the show. TY to @Netflix and everyone who watched."

Netflix has struggled with the variety talk genre. It had previously canceled shows like "Chelsea," "The Break with Michelle Wolf," and "The Joel McHale Show." Each lasted only one or two seasons. 

When it first debuted, "Patriot Act" seemed like it would be the variety series to go the distance for Netflix. When it premiered in 2018, consumer-insights company Crimson Hexagon found that "Patriot Act" was talked about more and better received in online conversations.

The show was a critical hit, as well, with the first season gaining a 100% Rotten Tomatoes critic score.

"[It] doesn't run away from political comedy convention while also aiming for something just different enough to make it stand apart," Variety wrote about season one.

Two other Netflix variety talk shows, "The Fix" and "Norm Macdonald Has a Show," haven't been formally canceled, but have only aired one season each since debuting in 2018. David Letterman's "My Next Guest Needs No Introduction" has fared better, but is on an irregular release schedule.

In a statement to a New York Times piece last year with the headline "Netflix Has a Talk Show Problem," Netflix's reality TV boss, Brandon Riegg, admitted that variety talk shows were a challenge for the streamer.

"The timeliness of the genre is a challenge for us as an on-demand service," Riegg said. "We've worked with many talented artists to pioneer talk shows for streaming audiences, and although some shows ended, we hope everyone involved is proud of what they created."

SEE ALSO: Major movie-theater chains like AMC and Regal are reopening this week, but a new survey suggests only a small fraction of US consumers are ready to return

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet

Bryan White 2018-12-26
img

I recently watched a stand-up show in which comedian Michelle Wolf made a cunning observation: “It’s our fault we’re not further along in period technology, because we’re ok that our best solution is a rolled-up piece of cotton.”

Whether it really is women’s fault is debatable, but she does make a valid point.

You would assume for a problem that affects half of the world’s population every month, we would have come up with something a little more innovative by now.

Increasingly however, women are not “ok with it.”

The last few years have seen a staggering increase in start-ups using technology to cater to female health concerns, from period tracking to fertility solutions.

Currently, 21 percent of female-founded companies are in the health sphere, a market that is predicted to grow to $50 billion by 2025.

Richard Baty 2018-10-30
img

"Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj" is Netflix's latest foray into talk-show territory, and a social-media analysis from Crimson Hexagon suggests it has a shot at success.

Netflix's other talk shows, such as "The Break with Michelle Wolf," have been canceled.

But Crimson Hexagon found that people talked more about and had a more positive reaction to "Patriot Act" when it premiered compared to the other shows.

"Patriot Act" is similar to HBO's "Last Week Tonight" in that Minhaj focuses on a single issue each episode, and critics have praised the host's humor and unique perspective.

"Patriot Act" debuted on Netflix with two episodes on October 28, and will be dropped on a weekly basis.

Topical shows have proven to be a challenge for Netflix, as they break its usual strategy of dropping all episodes at once for users to binge at their leisure.

William Mcneely 2018-05-01
img

Yet, a quick glance at social media over the past few days would suggest that political commentators have watched few, if any, of them.

Over the weekend, comedian Michelle Wolf hosted the White House Correspondents’ Dinner with a scathing routine that targeted Trump and his administration, with copious barbs reserved for other conservatives, Congress at large, and the media itself.

In one of her jokes, Wolf compared White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to Aunt Lydia, a brutal enabler of the fascist, anti-woman regime in The Handmaid’s Tale, and joked about how resourceful she is: “She burns facts, and then she uses that ash to create a perfect smoky eye.”

Beyond the inevitable outrage from conservatives about Wolf being disrespectful to the sensitive, innocent flower that is President Trump, came an even odder reaction: the idea that Wolf had attacked Sanders for her “physical appearance.” Many on Twitter — including Wolf, who noted “all these jokes were about her despicable behavior” — were baffled by this interpretation.

Sanders certainly took some body blows, but trying to find the affront to her looks felt like squinting at a magic eye poster, waiting for the insult to pop out and seeing nothing but ruthless attacks on her character.

The blowback was so bizarrely out of sync with Wolf’s jokes (and reality) that it’s hard not to wonder: do the people getting heated about this… know what a smoky eye is?