logo
logo
logo
logo
Jeffrey Baldwin 2016-10-13

I recently launched a company called Nail Quail which specializes in an anti fingernail biting product called Strong Will please critique the website at will .

I am finding it a bit difficult to properly market this product as most people aren't going to like or share a page that is related to a frustrating, usually hidden habit.

I have tried Facebook and Google ads which gave a lot of page views but no sales.

Honestly, the vast majority of our sales have come from the reddit community, specifically /r/calmhands which I frequent and google searches.

I have joined a social anxiety forum which I hope to contribute to as well.

I have recently contacted some bloggers in the hopes of arranging some reviews, but in the mean time I'd like to work on some other tactics.

collect
0
Everett Enriquez 2018-01-08
img

L'Oreal introduced a new wearable UV sensor today that you can stick on your nail.

It's truly just a sensor; it doesn't pair over Bluetooth or Wi-Fi to your phone.

Instead, it's NFC-enabled so you can scan it with your phone to retrieve the UV data it's collected.

It should work with both Android and iOS.

The UV Sense, as the company calls it, is meant to help people track how much time they spend in the sun without being overbearing.

The nail sticker is a statement, but not a massive one.

collect
0
Edgar Williams 2018-07-05
img

An unorthodox beauty treatment meant to rejuvenate the feet turned into a disturbing medical mystery for one young woman.

According to a case report published by her doctor in JAMA Dermatology, the woman’s toenails stopped growing and started falling off soon after she received a so-called fish pedicure.

Fish pedicures involve having small fish nibble at your feet while they’re soaked in a tub of warm or room temperature water.

The species of fish used — a toothless carp known as Garra rufa — are usually plant eaters, but in a pinch, they’ll also eat dead human skin.

The fish’s voracious feasting is said to help treat conditions like psoriasis as well as beautify the skin, lending them the nickname of “Doctor Fish.”

Unfortunately for the unnamed woman in her 20s, her experience was anything but rejuvenating.

collect
0
Juan Hackwell 2018-04-11
img

This man had a tiny second fingernail growing on top of the nail of his middle finger.

It looks like a second finger.

A 28-year-old man in Pakistan came to doctors with the abnormal nail growing out of his left middle finger.

The doctors took x-rays and found nothing unusual, beyond the obvious.

The growth was made of keratin, the same stuff normal human fingernails are made of.

It was a second, tiny nail growing from his middle finger.

collect
0
Kristie Hernandez 2016-08-26
img

For every genuinely clever device that manages to succeed on Kickstarter, there are 1,000 other ridiculous crowdfunding campaigns that thankfully don t succeed.

There s a chance you might roll your eyes at the Nail Capsule, unless you re not a monster and hate the thought of fingernail clippings flying all over the place.

It doesn t take a rocket scientist to figure out how the Nail Capsule works, but if you re having a hard time wrapping your head around it, you stick a finger in one end of the tube, nail clippers in the other, and go to work.

Flexible rubber membranes on either end allow access to appendages and clippers, but trap fingernail shrapnel so you can easily dispose of them later.

The creator of the Fingernail Capsule, Gerard O Leary, is trying to raise just north of $3,700 to help put his invention into production, and with a pledge of just shy of $8 you can help make it a reality, and get one for yourself in a couple of months.

As far as crowdfunding risks go, the Finger Capsule doesn t exactly require the skillsets you d find in a factory like Foxconn to manufacture it, so putting it into production shouldn t be that much of a problem.

collect
0
James Kiley 2016-08-26

For every genuinely clever device that manages to succeed on Kickstarter, there are 1,000 other ridiculous crowdfunding campaigns that thankfully don t succeed.

There s a chance you might roll your eyes at the Nail Capsule, unless you re not a monster and hate the thought of fingernail clippings flying all over the place.

It doesn t take a rocket scientist to figure out how the Nail Capsule works, but if you re having a hard time wrapping your head around it, you stick a finger in one end of the tube, nail clippers in the other, and go to work.

Flexible rubber membranes on either end allow access to appendages and clippers, but trap fingernail shrapnel so you can easily dispose of them later.

The creator of the Fingernail Capsule, Gerard O Leary, is trying to raise just north of $3,700 to help put his invention into production, and with a pledge of just shy of £6 you can help make it a reality, and get one for yourself in a couple of months.

As far as crowdfunding risks go, the Finger Capsule doesn t exactly require the skillsets you d find in a factory like Foxconn to manufacture it, so putting it into production shouldn t be that much of a problem.

collect
0
Troy Schindler 2016-07-15
img

Design student Lucie Davis has put London at her fingertips, literally, with her Oyster-activated nails that can be used to touch in and out of the Underground thanks to an ingeniously placed microchip.

The nails were created as part of Davis' BA in BA in jewellery design at UAL's Central Saint Martins and were showcased at the end of year show.

The inspiration for the Oyster nails came as part of a project that challenged the students to find extraordinary ideas from everyday events and Davis immediately thought about her daily commute.

"These ideas just kept popping up as I was experience my daily routine," said Davis.

"You get so immersed in it, it's an intimate, active thing – that's what I want to get across."

luciedavis 3 weeks ago Follow luciedaviscsminnovationtransportforlondoncsm news 352 likes 46 comments Instagram

collect
0
Isiah Jone 2018-01-10
img

A team of engineers at Northwestern University have teamed up with cosmetics company L’Oreal to create a fingernail wearable that lets users know when they’ve had too much Sun.

UV Sense is small enough to stick on your nail, simple enough to work without batteries, and sophisticated enough to record cumulative UV exposure to help wearers avoid skin cancer.

At last check, nearly 77,000 people were diagnosed with skin cancer in the United States, making melanoma the most common form of cancer in the country.

We tend to worship the sun like ancient Egyptians, spending entire days basking in its rays, too often neglecting the fact that a dark tan can lead to cancer.

With UV Sense, L’Oreal wants to make monitoring UV exposure easy.

No wider than a dime and as thick as an M, the solar-powered device has no battery, moving parts, or buttons.

collect
0
Charles Janow 2018-12-21

Grip strength can reveal a lot about a person — including whether a neurodegenerative disease is about to set in and how far it has progressed.

Fingernail monitoring is ideal for elderly patients, they claim, who risk infection from alternative options, like skin-based sensors.

“By pushing computation to the end of our fingers, we’ve found a new use for our nails by detecting and characterizing their subtle movements.”

Fingernails provide a valuable structure for the body’s somatosensory system, as it turns out.

As people move through the environment throughout the course of a day, neurons on the tips of their fingers act as near-constant sources of pressure, temperature, and texture feedback, leading them to interact with objects in somewhat repetitive, predictable ways.

This insight led the team “to believe it might be possible to derive … signals from how the fingernail bends,” Heisig and Sakuma wrote.

collect
0
James Manzo 2018-06-23
img

We’ve seen a smart hairbrush that can determine the quality of your hair, a smart mirror that can identify the health of your skin, and now there’s nail art that can track exposure to ultraviolet radiation when you’re out and about.

It can measure UV exposure, which you can track via a companion app on your smartphone.

It’s from L’Oréal’s Technology Incubator, which has created products such as the Makeup Genius app, where people can try different looks using a smartphone camera, and Le Teint Particulier an in-store device that scans your skin to create custom foundation for you.

We spoke to the team behind this micro wearable to see how they managed the feat.

L’Oréal Technology Incubator’s Global Vice President, Guive Balooch, and his team knew wearing a sticker daily wasn’t practical, unless at the beach or swimming pool.

To help come up with a new design and form for the UV Sense, Balooch brought back Swiss designer and Fuseproject founder, Yves Béhar, who designed the original My UV Patch.

collect
0
Jeffrey Baldwin 2016-10-13

I recently launched a company called Nail Quail which specializes in an anti fingernail biting product called Strong Will please critique the website at will .

I am finding it a bit difficult to properly market this product as most people aren't going to like or share a page that is related to a frustrating, usually hidden habit.

I have tried Facebook and Google ads which gave a lot of page views but no sales.

Honestly, the vast majority of our sales have come from the reddit community, specifically /r/calmhands which I frequent and google searches.

I have joined a social anxiety forum which I hope to contribute to as well.

I have recently contacted some bloggers in the hopes of arranging some reviews, but in the mean time I'd like to work on some other tactics.

Edgar Williams 2018-07-05
img

An unorthodox beauty treatment meant to rejuvenate the feet turned into a disturbing medical mystery for one young woman.

According to a case report published by her doctor in JAMA Dermatology, the woman’s toenails stopped growing and started falling off soon after she received a so-called fish pedicure.

Fish pedicures involve having small fish nibble at your feet while they’re soaked in a tub of warm or room temperature water.

The species of fish used — a toothless carp known as Garra rufa — are usually plant eaters, but in a pinch, they’ll also eat dead human skin.

The fish’s voracious feasting is said to help treat conditions like psoriasis as well as beautify the skin, lending them the nickname of “Doctor Fish.”

Unfortunately for the unnamed woman in her 20s, her experience was anything but rejuvenating.

Kristie Hernandez 2016-08-26
img

For every genuinely clever device that manages to succeed on Kickstarter, there are 1,000 other ridiculous crowdfunding campaigns that thankfully don t succeed.

There s a chance you might roll your eyes at the Nail Capsule, unless you re not a monster and hate the thought of fingernail clippings flying all over the place.

It doesn t take a rocket scientist to figure out how the Nail Capsule works, but if you re having a hard time wrapping your head around it, you stick a finger in one end of the tube, nail clippers in the other, and go to work.

Flexible rubber membranes on either end allow access to appendages and clippers, but trap fingernail shrapnel so you can easily dispose of them later.

The creator of the Fingernail Capsule, Gerard O Leary, is trying to raise just north of $3,700 to help put his invention into production, and with a pledge of just shy of $8 you can help make it a reality, and get one for yourself in a couple of months.

As far as crowdfunding risks go, the Finger Capsule doesn t exactly require the skillsets you d find in a factory like Foxconn to manufacture it, so putting it into production shouldn t be that much of a problem.

Troy Schindler 2016-07-15
img

Design student Lucie Davis has put London at her fingertips, literally, with her Oyster-activated nails that can be used to touch in and out of the Underground thanks to an ingeniously placed microchip.

The nails were created as part of Davis' BA in BA in jewellery design at UAL's Central Saint Martins and were showcased at the end of year show.

The inspiration for the Oyster nails came as part of a project that challenged the students to find extraordinary ideas from everyday events and Davis immediately thought about her daily commute.

"These ideas just kept popping up as I was experience my daily routine," said Davis.

"You get so immersed in it, it's an intimate, active thing – that's what I want to get across."

luciedavis 3 weeks ago Follow luciedaviscsminnovationtransportforlondoncsm news 352 likes 46 comments Instagram

Charles Janow 2018-12-21

Grip strength can reveal a lot about a person — including whether a neurodegenerative disease is about to set in and how far it has progressed.

Fingernail monitoring is ideal for elderly patients, they claim, who risk infection from alternative options, like skin-based sensors.

“By pushing computation to the end of our fingers, we’ve found a new use for our nails by detecting and characterizing their subtle movements.”

Fingernails provide a valuable structure for the body’s somatosensory system, as it turns out.

As people move through the environment throughout the course of a day, neurons on the tips of their fingers act as near-constant sources of pressure, temperature, and texture feedback, leading them to interact with objects in somewhat repetitive, predictable ways.

This insight led the team “to believe it might be possible to derive … signals from how the fingernail bends,” Heisig and Sakuma wrote.

Everett Enriquez 2018-01-08
img

L'Oreal introduced a new wearable UV sensor today that you can stick on your nail.

It's truly just a sensor; it doesn't pair over Bluetooth or Wi-Fi to your phone.

Instead, it's NFC-enabled so you can scan it with your phone to retrieve the UV data it's collected.

It should work with both Android and iOS.

The UV Sense, as the company calls it, is meant to help people track how much time they spend in the sun without being overbearing.

The nail sticker is a statement, but not a massive one.

Juan Hackwell 2018-04-11
img

This man had a tiny second fingernail growing on top of the nail of his middle finger.

It looks like a second finger.

A 28-year-old man in Pakistan came to doctors with the abnormal nail growing out of his left middle finger.

The doctors took x-rays and found nothing unusual, beyond the obvious.

The growth was made of keratin, the same stuff normal human fingernails are made of.

It was a second, tiny nail growing from his middle finger.

James Kiley 2016-08-26

For every genuinely clever device that manages to succeed on Kickstarter, there are 1,000 other ridiculous crowdfunding campaigns that thankfully don t succeed.

There s a chance you might roll your eyes at the Nail Capsule, unless you re not a monster and hate the thought of fingernail clippings flying all over the place.

It doesn t take a rocket scientist to figure out how the Nail Capsule works, but if you re having a hard time wrapping your head around it, you stick a finger in one end of the tube, nail clippers in the other, and go to work.

Flexible rubber membranes on either end allow access to appendages and clippers, but trap fingernail shrapnel so you can easily dispose of them later.

The creator of the Fingernail Capsule, Gerard O Leary, is trying to raise just north of $3,700 to help put his invention into production, and with a pledge of just shy of £6 you can help make it a reality, and get one for yourself in a couple of months.

As far as crowdfunding risks go, the Finger Capsule doesn t exactly require the skillsets you d find in a factory like Foxconn to manufacture it, so putting it into production shouldn t be that much of a problem.

Isiah Jone 2018-01-10
img

A team of engineers at Northwestern University have teamed up with cosmetics company L’Oreal to create a fingernail wearable that lets users know when they’ve had too much Sun.

UV Sense is small enough to stick on your nail, simple enough to work without batteries, and sophisticated enough to record cumulative UV exposure to help wearers avoid skin cancer.

At last check, nearly 77,000 people were diagnosed with skin cancer in the United States, making melanoma the most common form of cancer in the country.

We tend to worship the sun like ancient Egyptians, spending entire days basking in its rays, too often neglecting the fact that a dark tan can lead to cancer.

With UV Sense, L’Oreal wants to make monitoring UV exposure easy.

No wider than a dime and as thick as an M, the solar-powered device has no battery, moving parts, or buttons.

James Manzo 2018-06-23
img

We’ve seen a smart hairbrush that can determine the quality of your hair, a smart mirror that can identify the health of your skin, and now there’s nail art that can track exposure to ultraviolet radiation when you’re out and about.

It can measure UV exposure, which you can track via a companion app on your smartphone.

It’s from L’Oréal’s Technology Incubator, which has created products such as the Makeup Genius app, where people can try different looks using a smartphone camera, and Le Teint Particulier an in-store device that scans your skin to create custom foundation for you.

We spoke to the team behind this micro wearable to see how they managed the feat.

L’Oréal Technology Incubator’s Global Vice President, Guive Balooch, and his team knew wearing a sticker daily wasn’t practical, unless at the beach or swimming pool.

To help come up with a new design and form for the UV Sense, Balooch brought back Swiss designer and Fuseproject founder, Yves Béhar, who designed the original My UV Patch.