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Wendy Pini 2021-03-05
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Texas neanderthal shirthttps://moteefe.com/store/texas-neanderthal-shirtShop Texas Neanderthal shirt.

You'd like this Proud Texas Neanderthal shirt.

Special run of this shirt is for you.

Buy Texas Neanderthal thinking shirt.

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Wendy Pini 2021-03-05
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Texas Neanderthal thinking shirthttps://teechip.com/Texas-Neanderthal-thinking-shirtShop Texas Neanderthal thinking shirt.

You'd like this Proud Texas Neanderthal shirt.

Special run of this shirt is for you.

Buy Texas Neanderthal thinking t shirt.

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Wendy Pini 2021-03-07
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Warning neanderthal thinking shirthttps://moteefe.com/store/warning-neanderthal-thinking-shirtShop Warning neanderthal thinking shirt.

You'd like this Warning neanderthal thinking 2021 shirt.

Special run of this shirt is for you.

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Anthony Sullivan 2018-11-28
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Researchers have published the results of a new study that shows that breeding between Neanderthal and early humans was much more common than previously believed.

Early humans and Neanderthal lived together for about 30,000 years and were certain to have had frequent contact in that span.

Previously, researchers found that at least one pairing of a Neanderthal and an early human resulted in an offspring, that fact is reflected in the DNA of modern humans.

The scientists point out that about 2% of DNA in non-African humans today is Neanderthal in origin.

Current research has found that some people in East Asia have up to 20% more Neanderthal DNA than people who are strictly European descent.

Data for the study was pulled from the 1000 Genomes Project and measured the amount of Neanderthal DNA in the genetic material from volunteers.

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0
Jarvis Lett 2018-05-16
img

First, Harvard University sets out to bring the woolly mammoth back to life.

Now, researchers from Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have stated their intention to create miniature brains containing Neanderthal DNA.

If you’re wondering where Neanderthal DNA — referring to the genetic code of the archaic humans who lived up to 250,000 years ago — came from, the answer is a previous project from many of the same researchers.

Starting around a decade ago, the Neanderthal genome project set out to sequence the DNA of ancient man.

This DNA was first recovered from the femur bones of three 38,000-year-old female Neanderthal specimens from Croatia, along with other bones discovered in Spain, Russia and Germany.

The project’s findings were ultimately reported in late 2013.

collect
0
John Johannes 2017-10-06
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A international team of researchers has completed one of the most detailed analyses of a Neanderthal genome to date.

Before this new study, only four Neanderthal specimens have had their genomes sequenced.

The new analysis, enabled by a remarkably well-preserved genome taken from a 52,000 year old bone fragment, is now the second Neanderthal genome to be fully sequenced in high fidelity.

The resulting study, now published in Science, confirms a bunch of things we already knew about Neanderthals, while also revealing some things we didn’t know.

The international research team that conducted this study—a group led by Kay Prüfer and Svante Pääbo from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany—sequenced the genome of a female Neanderthal, dubbed Vindija 33.19, whose remains were uncovered at Vindija Cave in northern Croatia.

And indeed, the researchers made some interesting discoveries.

collect
0
William Hill 2017-09-22
img

The remains of a young Neanderthal boy are helping shed light on how Neanderthals developed such large brains (larger than that of modern humans, in fact).

According to the study, these larger brains were likely due to longer growth periods.

Such a conclusion was made by analyzing the largely complete and well-preserved skeletal remains of a Neanderthal child estimated to have been 7 or 8 at the time of death.

The remains were discovered at a site in Spain dated back about 49,000 years, and they presented the unique opportunity to study a nearly complete Neanderthal skeleton.

The researchers set out to discover whether Neanderthals developed as fast as other primates or more slowly like modern humans.

First things first, the remains indicate that the Neanderthal child’s brain was still developing at the time of death; researchers peg the develop as having been nearly 88% finished (when compared to the size of adult Neanderthal brains, that is).

collect
0
Robert Drummond 2017-10-06
img

A international team of researchers has completed one of the most detailed analyses of a Neanderthal genome to date.

Before this new study, only four Neanderthal specimens have had their genomes sequenced.

The new analysis, enabled by a remarkably well-preserved genome taken from a 52,000 year old bone fragment, is now the second Neanderthal genome to be fully sequenced in high fidelity.

The resulting study, now published in Science, confirms a bunch of things we already knew about Neanderthals, while also revealing some things we didn’t know.

The international research team that conducted this study—a group led by Kay Prüfer and Svante Pääbo from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany—sequenced the genome of a female Neanderthal, dubbed Vindija 33.19, whose remains were uncovered at Vindija Cave in northern Croatia.

And indeed, the researchers made some interesting discoveries.

collect
0
John Salmi 2018-08-23
img

The closest known extinct relatives of modern humans were the thick-browed Neanderthals and the mysterious Denisovans.

The finding confirms interbreeding that had been only hinted at in earlier genetic studies.

[In Images: The First Bone from a Neanderthal-Denisovan Hybrid]

Archaeological excavations have revealed that Neanderthals and Denisovans coexisted in Eurasia, with Neanderthal bones ranging from 200,000 to 40,000 years old unearthed mostly in western Eurasia and Denisovans so far only known from fossils ranging from 200,000 to 30,000years old found in eastern Eurasia.

Prior work unearthed Neanderthal remains in Denisova Cave, raising questions on how closely they interacted.

"A Neanderthal and a Denisovan were genetically more distant from each other than any two people living today are," study co-author Viviane Slon, a paleogeneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, said in an email to Live Science.

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0
Joseph Averitt 2016-07-08
img

A cave in Belgium has produced remains with signs of cannibalism among Neanderthals in the region, according to a new study.

The bones were found in the Troisieme cavern in Goyet; it is the largest cache of Neanderthal bones found in Northern Europe, and it comprises four adults and one child.

Of these remains, about 30-percent of the bones are broken in a way that would have been used to extract marrow and they show cut marks from tools that only human could wield.

The tool marks on the bones, of course, indicate that the Neanderthal remains were cut by fellow living members, and is the primary sign of cannibalism.

Similar breaks and cut marks have been found in reindeer and horses remains found at Neanderthal sites, indicating that some Neanderthal remains were prepared and consumed the same way as animals.

Furthermore, researchers found evidence that some of the Neanderthal bones were used to help shape stone tools, likely to sharpen the edge of knives due to the relative softness of bones compared to stone .

collect
0
Joshua Herbert 2021-04-17
img
Researchers have used a new method to extract DNA of Neanderthals from the soil of caves they inhabited to reveal how they came back from near extinction at least twice before finally disappearing from the planet. A new study was published last week showing details of how an international team of researchers recovered fragments of Neanderthal genetic material that dated … Continue reading
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0
Robert Russo 2021-07-06
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Back about 51,000 years ago, a Neanderthal decided they would express their artistic soul to work on a piece of deer bone. This individual resided in what’s now known as Northern Germany’s Harz Mountains. Not only did this ancient artist have the capacity to carve a pattern into bone, they knew enough about the physical properties of the bone to … Continue reading
collect
0
Kenneth Mulcahy 2018-11-09
img

Around 250,000 years ago, two Neanderthal children were exposed to excessive levels of lead in what is now France, according to new research.

It’s the oldest known case of lead exposure in hominin remains—a discovery that’s presenting an obvious question: How could this have possibly happened so long ago?

A new paper published last week in Science Advances sheds new light on the environmental conditions endured by Neanderthal children some 250,000 years ago.

Ice Age winters, as the new research suggests, had a profound influence on the health of young Neanderthals.

That’s hardly a surprise—but the discovery of lead exposure among two Neanderthal infants most certainly is.

Teeth are like tree rings, chronicling an individual’s history of chemical and environmental exposure.

collect
0
Letha Byrd 2018-06-28
img

If you want to study a Neanderthal's brain, you would think you're out of luck.

Only the bones of our extinct ancestral humans remain, so it's hard for us to grasp how they were wired some 40,000 years ago.

The solution: make your own Neanderthal mini brain in a petri dish.

That's what Alysson Muotri, a geneticist at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and his team have done, recently describing Neanderthal "organoids" at a UCSD conference, reports Science Magazine.

"We're trying to recreate Neanderthal minds," Muotri told Science.

Traditionally, scientists working to unravel the mysteries of normal human physiology and disease use cell suspensions and cultures, producing 2D or 2.5D planes and sheets of cells.

collect
0
William Hill 2017-02-24

Neanderthals haven’t existed for the better part of 40,000 years, but their genes continue to affect present day humans in important ways.

According to a new study, Neanderthal DNA resulting from the mating of Neanderthals with humans is still active in 52 varieties of human tissue, influencing gene expression.

This influence includes things like making people taller and reducing one’s odds of developing schizophrenia.

This work and others like it have been made possible via the sequencing of Neanderthal DNA that was performed successfully back in 2008.

Most recently, researchers being led by the University of Washington’s Joshua Akey used that DNA and compared it to DNA taken from more than 200 volunteers located in the United States.

Doing so, they discovered dozens of tissue types in which some Neanderthal genes are still present and active.

collect
0
Edgar Williams 2021-07-06
img
Scientists keep finding ways to challenge Neanderthal stereotypes.
collect
0
Wendy Pini 2021-03-05
img

Texas neanderthal shirthttps://moteefe.com/store/texas-neanderthal-shirtShop Texas Neanderthal shirt.

You'd like this Proud Texas Neanderthal shirt.

Special run of this shirt is for you.

Buy Texas Neanderthal thinking shirt.

Wendy Pini 2021-03-07
img

Warning neanderthal thinking shirthttps://moteefe.com/store/warning-neanderthal-thinking-shirtShop Warning neanderthal thinking shirt.

You'd like this Warning neanderthal thinking 2021 shirt.

Special run of this shirt is for you.

Jarvis Lett 2018-05-16
img

First, Harvard University sets out to bring the woolly mammoth back to life.

Now, researchers from Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have stated their intention to create miniature brains containing Neanderthal DNA.

If you’re wondering where Neanderthal DNA — referring to the genetic code of the archaic humans who lived up to 250,000 years ago — came from, the answer is a previous project from many of the same researchers.

Starting around a decade ago, the Neanderthal genome project set out to sequence the DNA of ancient man.

This DNA was first recovered from the femur bones of three 38,000-year-old female Neanderthal specimens from Croatia, along with other bones discovered in Spain, Russia and Germany.

The project’s findings were ultimately reported in late 2013.

William Hill 2017-09-22
img

The remains of a young Neanderthal boy are helping shed light on how Neanderthals developed such large brains (larger than that of modern humans, in fact).

According to the study, these larger brains were likely due to longer growth periods.

Such a conclusion was made by analyzing the largely complete and well-preserved skeletal remains of a Neanderthal child estimated to have been 7 or 8 at the time of death.

The remains were discovered at a site in Spain dated back about 49,000 years, and they presented the unique opportunity to study a nearly complete Neanderthal skeleton.

The researchers set out to discover whether Neanderthals developed as fast as other primates or more slowly like modern humans.

First things first, the remains indicate that the Neanderthal child’s brain was still developing at the time of death; researchers peg the develop as having been nearly 88% finished (when compared to the size of adult Neanderthal brains, that is).

John Salmi 2018-08-23
img

The closest known extinct relatives of modern humans were the thick-browed Neanderthals and the mysterious Denisovans.

The finding confirms interbreeding that had been only hinted at in earlier genetic studies.

[In Images: The First Bone from a Neanderthal-Denisovan Hybrid]

Archaeological excavations have revealed that Neanderthals and Denisovans coexisted in Eurasia, with Neanderthal bones ranging from 200,000 to 40,000 years old unearthed mostly in western Eurasia and Denisovans so far only known from fossils ranging from 200,000 to 30,000years old found in eastern Eurasia.

Prior work unearthed Neanderthal remains in Denisova Cave, raising questions on how closely they interacted.

"A Neanderthal and a Denisovan were genetically more distant from each other than any two people living today are," study co-author Viviane Slon, a paleogeneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, said in an email to Live Science.

Joshua Herbert 2021-04-17
img
Researchers have used a new method to extract DNA of Neanderthals from the soil of caves they inhabited to reveal how they came back from near extinction at least twice before finally disappearing from the planet. A new study was published last week showing details of how an international team of researchers recovered fragments of Neanderthal genetic material that dated … Continue reading
Kenneth Mulcahy 2018-11-09
img

Around 250,000 years ago, two Neanderthal children were exposed to excessive levels of lead in what is now France, according to new research.

It’s the oldest known case of lead exposure in hominin remains—a discovery that’s presenting an obvious question: How could this have possibly happened so long ago?

A new paper published last week in Science Advances sheds new light on the environmental conditions endured by Neanderthal children some 250,000 years ago.

Ice Age winters, as the new research suggests, had a profound influence on the health of young Neanderthals.

That’s hardly a surprise—but the discovery of lead exposure among two Neanderthal infants most certainly is.

Teeth are like tree rings, chronicling an individual’s history of chemical and environmental exposure.

William Hill 2017-02-24

Neanderthals haven’t existed for the better part of 40,000 years, but their genes continue to affect present day humans in important ways.

According to a new study, Neanderthal DNA resulting from the mating of Neanderthals with humans is still active in 52 varieties of human tissue, influencing gene expression.

This influence includes things like making people taller and reducing one’s odds of developing schizophrenia.

This work and others like it have been made possible via the sequencing of Neanderthal DNA that was performed successfully back in 2008.

Most recently, researchers being led by the University of Washington’s Joshua Akey used that DNA and compared it to DNA taken from more than 200 volunteers located in the United States.

Doing so, they discovered dozens of tissue types in which some Neanderthal genes are still present and active.

Wendy Pini 2021-03-05
img

Texas Neanderthal thinking shirthttps://teechip.com/Texas-Neanderthal-thinking-shirtShop Texas Neanderthal thinking shirt.

You'd like this Proud Texas Neanderthal shirt.

Special run of this shirt is for you.

Buy Texas Neanderthal thinking t shirt.

Anthony Sullivan 2018-11-28
img

Researchers have published the results of a new study that shows that breeding between Neanderthal and early humans was much more common than previously believed.

Early humans and Neanderthal lived together for about 30,000 years and were certain to have had frequent contact in that span.

Previously, researchers found that at least one pairing of a Neanderthal and an early human resulted in an offspring, that fact is reflected in the DNA of modern humans.

The scientists point out that about 2% of DNA in non-African humans today is Neanderthal in origin.

Current research has found that some people in East Asia have up to 20% more Neanderthal DNA than people who are strictly European descent.

Data for the study was pulled from the 1000 Genomes Project and measured the amount of Neanderthal DNA in the genetic material from volunteers.

John Johannes 2017-10-06
img

A international team of researchers has completed one of the most detailed analyses of a Neanderthal genome to date.

Before this new study, only four Neanderthal specimens have had their genomes sequenced.

The new analysis, enabled by a remarkably well-preserved genome taken from a 52,000 year old bone fragment, is now the second Neanderthal genome to be fully sequenced in high fidelity.

The resulting study, now published in Science, confirms a bunch of things we already knew about Neanderthals, while also revealing some things we didn’t know.

The international research team that conducted this study—a group led by Kay Prüfer and Svante Pääbo from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany—sequenced the genome of a female Neanderthal, dubbed Vindija 33.19, whose remains were uncovered at Vindija Cave in northern Croatia.

And indeed, the researchers made some interesting discoveries.

Robert Drummond 2017-10-06
img

A international team of researchers has completed one of the most detailed analyses of a Neanderthal genome to date.

Before this new study, only four Neanderthal specimens have had their genomes sequenced.

The new analysis, enabled by a remarkably well-preserved genome taken from a 52,000 year old bone fragment, is now the second Neanderthal genome to be fully sequenced in high fidelity.

The resulting study, now published in Science, confirms a bunch of things we already knew about Neanderthals, while also revealing some things we didn’t know.

The international research team that conducted this study—a group led by Kay Prüfer and Svante Pääbo from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany—sequenced the genome of a female Neanderthal, dubbed Vindija 33.19, whose remains were uncovered at Vindija Cave in northern Croatia.

And indeed, the researchers made some interesting discoveries.

Joseph Averitt 2016-07-08
img

A cave in Belgium has produced remains with signs of cannibalism among Neanderthals in the region, according to a new study.

The bones were found in the Troisieme cavern in Goyet; it is the largest cache of Neanderthal bones found in Northern Europe, and it comprises four adults and one child.

Of these remains, about 30-percent of the bones are broken in a way that would have been used to extract marrow and they show cut marks from tools that only human could wield.

The tool marks on the bones, of course, indicate that the Neanderthal remains were cut by fellow living members, and is the primary sign of cannibalism.

Similar breaks and cut marks have been found in reindeer and horses remains found at Neanderthal sites, indicating that some Neanderthal remains were prepared and consumed the same way as animals.

Furthermore, researchers found evidence that some of the Neanderthal bones were used to help shape stone tools, likely to sharpen the edge of knives due to the relative softness of bones compared to stone .

Robert Russo 2021-07-06
img
Back about 51,000 years ago, a Neanderthal decided they would express their artistic soul to work on a piece of deer bone. This individual resided in what’s now known as Northern Germany’s Harz Mountains. Not only did this ancient artist have the capacity to carve a pattern into bone, they knew enough about the physical properties of the bone to … Continue reading
Letha Byrd 2018-06-28
img

If you want to study a Neanderthal's brain, you would think you're out of luck.

Only the bones of our extinct ancestral humans remain, so it's hard for us to grasp how they were wired some 40,000 years ago.

The solution: make your own Neanderthal mini brain in a petri dish.

That's what Alysson Muotri, a geneticist at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and his team have done, recently describing Neanderthal "organoids" at a UCSD conference, reports Science Magazine.

"We're trying to recreate Neanderthal minds," Muotri told Science.

Traditionally, scientists working to unravel the mysteries of normal human physiology and disease use cell suspensions and cultures, producing 2D or 2.5D planes and sheets of cells.

Edgar Williams 2021-07-06
img
Scientists keep finding ways to challenge Neanderthal stereotypes.