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David Sandoval 2021-07-23
img

Reg reader reveals colossal 821-item collection of Amazon trademarks tucked away on its site

Recently, a Reg reader contacted us at Vulture (virtual) Towers with something odd they'd found online – a page tucked away in the little-visited “Legal Policies” section of Amazon's website containing a "non-exhaustive" list of all the trademarks held by the company.…

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0
Robert Holloway 2020-09-19
img
Going back to school during the middle of the pandemic has me worried about my health, the health of my family, and the health of the country.
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0
Julian Dunkelberger 2017-05-23
img

p Where are they now?

It’s a simple but still powerful narrative trigger, put to effective use this week by the editors of New York magazine.

In 1972, Jennifer Rogers appeared with her four young children on the cover of the May 15, 1972 issue, for a story about her impending divorce and move to the city in the shadow of the women’s liberation movement.

For this week’s issue, exactly 45 years later, Rogers has checked back in.

Her begins with the revelation that her then-first husband immediately disappeared upon the publication of the article, resurfacing in Paris with another woman.

But that was the least of her problems:

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0
Peter Garvey 2018-04-26

New York Magazine’s The Cut is wading into the merchandise business.

For $24.99, white T-shirts modeled after The Cut’s Instagram quote cards, featuring phrases, headlines and pop culture references are now available on Amazon.

“We thought it was funny, basically.

Several of us said we’d love to make our own custom T-shirts and we thought Cut headlines could be fun and ironic when worn on a body instead of a headline in an article,” Stella Bugbee, president and editor in chief of The Cut, said.

Examples include: “Engagement Chicken” (as a nod to what Meghan Markle and Prince Harry were making the night he proposed), “The Wind Is A Very Deceiving Thing” (referencing President Trump’s quip about the force that ruffled his hair) and “Let Me Fat In Peace” (rapper Cardi B’s response to fans who—accurately—predicted she was pregnant).

“This is just an editorial approach but taken to a new medium, in this case, T-shirts,” Bugbee said.

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0
James Mccullough 2017-04-06
img

New York magazine has been giving its print subscribers shopping recommendations for more than a decade.

But when it turned its print feature The Strategist into a digital e-commerce brand last year, it had to start from scratch.

Would it be for readers on the verge of buying something, or for readers who are just thinking about it?

Do those readers prefer to buy from Macy’s or Nordstrom?

“The Strategist is a new brand for most people,” said Camilla Cho, New York’s executive director of strategy and business development.

After nearly a year of sharing commerce posts on sister brands like The Cut, Grub Street and Reply All, Cho and her team are starting to figure things out.

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0
Thomas Crain 2017-06-17
img

Amanda Yang is Director of Analytics at New York Magazine, where she works with editorial, development, and product to help make decisions using data.

Prior to New York Magazine, she worked at VICE Media as a data scientist and worked on projects to help understand brand safety, categorizing content, optimizing videos in search and better visualizing ad server information.

In her spare time, she enjoys working on her adventure van and taking it places to climb, run or whatever sounds fun.

You can follow her on Twitter: @amandamaiyang

She will be live on June 22 starting at 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which she will answer as many questions as possible.

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0
James Talbot 2019-02-04
img

When Smugmug bought Flickr at the end of last year, folks who were using it as a repository for their photos received some bad news.

Instead of the 1TB of storage Flickr had been offering when it was owned by Yahoo, Smugmug changed that to a mere 1000 photos, unless of course you signed up for a Flickr Pro subscription, which runs $50 a year.

Those who don’t shell out for a Pro subscription will have their photos purged until they’re at the 1000 photo threshold, and that purge begins tomorrow.

Yes, if you haven’t taken measures to get your excess photos off of Flickr, tomorrow they’ll be deleted beginning with the oldest ones.

The good news is that you still have time to save your photos from oblivion, provided you’re willing to put up with some convoluted download methods.

As Gizmodo explains it, there are two ways to download your photos from Flickr.

collect
0
Harvey Broughton 2021-05-14
img
The billionaire told New York Magazine that he couldn't pass on the chance to invest in cryptocurrencies.
collect
0
Michael Ambriz 2021-06-17
img
"There's pain and daddy issues that exist beneath this," one source close to Giuliani told New York Magazine.
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0
Mark Alexander 2020-12-16
img

Posted by Dr-Pete

On December 3rd, Google announced that they were rolling out the latest Core Update. Initially, the bulk of the impact seemed to arrive on that date, with MozCast spiking at 112.4°F:

We measured above-average ranking flux in the three days prior to the update announcement, and a few days after the announcement, but the bulk of the flux seemed to occur on the roll-out day. (The dotted line represents the 30-day average prior to December 3rd.)

How did December 2020 compare to other Core Updates?

While technically the third largest named core update, Google's December Core Update was very close in measured impact to the May 2020 Core Update and the August 2018 "Medic" Update.

Winners and more winners

Back in May, I came down pretty hard on winners and losers reports. I don't want to discourage all core update analyses, but our rush to publish can produce misleading results, especially with multi-day updates. In May, I settled on a 7-day update analysis, comparing the full week before the update to the full week after. This helps better reflect multi-day roll-outs and also cleans up the noise of sites with naturally high flux, such as news sites (which often wax and wane on a weekly cycle).

Below are the top 20 overall winners in our MozCast data set, by percentage gain:

Note the 1-day comparisons (December 4th vs. December 2nd) vs. 7-day and in particular the orange values — five of our top 20 picked up considerably more gains after the bulk of the update hit. We also saw some reversals, but the majority of sites recorded their wins and losses early in this update.

Another challenge with winners and losers analyses is that it's easy for large percentage gains and losses from small sites to overshadow larger sites that might see much larger traffic and revenue impact. Here are the top 20 winners across the 100 largest sites in our tracking set:

Note that New York Magazine picked up considerably more gains after December 4th. Of course, for any given site, we can't prove these gains were due to the core update. While Apple's App Store was the big winner here, a handful of big sites saw gains over +20%, and eBay fared particularly well.

Winningest content / pages

We tend to focus on domain-level winners and losers, simply because grouping by domains gives us more data to work with, but we also know that many of Google's changes work at the page level. So, I decided to try something new and explore the winners among individual pages in our data set.

I stuck to the top 100 most visible pages in our data set, removed home pages, and then looked only at the 7-day (before vs. after) change. Here are the top 10 winners, along with their 7-day gain (I've opted for a text list, so that you can click through to these pages, if you'd like to explore):

  1. +126%https://www.cashnetusa.com/paydayloans.html
  2. +65%https://www.trulia.com/rent/
  3. +58%https://www.customink.com/products/t-shirts/4
  4. +53%https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/calculators/taxcaster/
  5. +41%https://www.whitepages.com/person
  6. +40%https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/gardening/advice/...
  7. +38%https://www.nerdwallet.com/mortgages/mortgage-rates
  8. +33%https://www.bankrate.com/calculators/mortgages/...
  9. +26%https://www.wellsfargo.com/mortgage/rates/
  10. +23%https://smartasset.com/mortgage/mortgage-calculator

It's interesting to note a number of shifts in financial services and especially around mortgage rates and calculators. Of course, we can't speak to causality. It's entirely possible that some of these pages moved up because competitors lost ground. For example, https://www.mortgagecalculator.org lost 23% of their visibility in the 7-day over 7-day comparison.

While it's interesting to explore these pages to look for common themes, please note that a short-term ranking gain doesn't necessarily mean that any given page is doing something right or was rewarded by the core update.

What trends are you seeing?

Now that the dust has mostly settled, are you seeing any clear trends? Are any specific types of pages performing better or worse than before? As an industry, analyzing Core Updates has a long way to go (and, to be fair, it's an incredibly complex problem), but I think what's critical is that we try to push a little harder each time and learn a little bit more. If you have any ideas on how to expand on these analyses, especially at a page level, let us know in the comments.


Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

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0
Johnny Huff 2021-05-13
img
Advisers to Shaun Donovan and Scott Stringer both told New York Magazine that they doubted Yang answered the questions without getting help.
collect
0
Thomas Brazier 2021-07-09
img
New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz declined a $250,000 Substack newsletter deal, saying, "It is not my real work to write for 'subscribers.'"
collect
0
John Murphy 2021-04-26
img
The streaming giant is reportedly in talks with acclaimed director David Fincher about a third season of Mindhunter.
collect
0
Eddie Waldo 2019-03-11
img

New York Media has laid off 32 people, half of them were full-timers and were 5% of full-time staff.

The company behind the popular New York magazine was exploring options last year, including a sale.

The layoffs come at a punishing time for media generally, with BuzzFeed, HuffPost, Vice among those laying off staff this year.

New York Media, parent of the popular New York magazine and other online verticals including The Cut and Vulture, has laid off 32 people as it undergoes restructuring.

The family-owned company has undergone some upheaval recently in a tough time for print and online media generally.

It said last summer it was exploring options, including a sale.

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2017-07-14
img

New York adds Sara Holdren as theater critic for New York magazine/Vulture and Ezekiel Kweku and Benjamin Hart to news and politics vertical Daily Intelligencer.

Holdren’s background is not in criticism, or even media, for that matter, but theater itself, where she has been artistic director and co-founder of Brooklyn-based theater company Tiltyard and has also served as theatre director on other productions.

“We were looking for a fresh, exciting voice, and we found her,” said New York magazine editor in chief Adam Moss in a statement.

“Sara never imagined herself a critic but she has the makings of a great one.

She comes at theater criticism from an unusual background and perspective, which will be helpful, but she also happens to be a wonderful critical writer–vivid, wry, interesting, impassioned.

We’re excited to welcome her to the dialogue.”

collect
0
Daniel Patel 2016-06-28
img

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has completely reinvented the way the Washington Post is run since buying the paper for $250 million in 2013.But the biggest change Bezos is bringing to the 140-year old paper may be in the way it's generating revenue: by selling software.According to a New York Magazine feature about the Washington Post on Tuesday, the Post is hoping to bring in $100 million in annual revenue by selling some of its software, including the content management system CMS used by its editorial staff to publish articles.Although it's still in its early days, with only about a dozen local papers using the CMS so far, the Post clearly sees the business of selling software as a potential new revenue source.

It just recently launched a new digital advertising platform which speeds up load time, while it's also built an internal data analytics system that can track every little detail of reader behavior online, the New York Magazine wrote.Establishing this new source of revenue would be critical for the long term success of the paper.

The Post is estimated to have generated $350 million in annual revenue, a significant drop from the $580 million in brought in in 2012, the report said.

Bezos also plans to cut the paper's $500 million budget by half within the next three years, it said.

We can t be an organization that loses gobs and gobs of money," Bezos told Shailesh Prakash, the Post's chief technology officer, the report said.Read the full New York Magazine story here.

Disclosure: Jeff Bezos is an investor in Business Insider through his

personal investment company Bezos Expeditions.NOW WATCH: How to use Facebook s awesome new 360-degree photo featureLoading video...

collect
0
David Sandoval 2021-07-23
img

Reg reader reveals colossal 821-item collection of Amazon trademarks tucked away on its site

Recently, a Reg reader contacted us at Vulture (virtual) Towers with something odd they'd found online – a page tucked away in the little-visited “Legal Policies” section of Amazon's website containing a "non-exhaustive" list of all the trademarks held by the company.…

Julian Dunkelberger 2017-05-23
img

p Where are they now?

It’s a simple but still powerful narrative trigger, put to effective use this week by the editors of New York magazine.

In 1972, Jennifer Rogers appeared with her four young children on the cover of the May 15, 1972 issue, for a story about her impending divorce and move to the city in the shadow of the women’s liberation movement.

For this week’s issue, exactly 45 years later, Rogers has checked back in.

Her begins with the revelation that her then-first husband immediately disappeared upon the publication of the article, resurfacing in Paris with another woman.

But that was the least of her problems:

James Mccullough 2017-04-06
img

New York magazine has been giving its print subscribers shopping recommendations for more than a decade.

But when it turned its print feature The Strategist into a digital e-commerce brand last year, it had to start from scratch.

Would it be for readers on the verge of buying something, or for readers who are just thinking about it?

Do those readers prefer to buy from Macy’s or Nordstrom?

“The Strategist is a new brand for most people,” said Camilla Cho, New York’s executive director of strategy and business development.

After nearly a year of sharing commerce posts on sister brands like The Cut, Grub Street and Reply All, Cho and her team are starting to figure things out.

James Talbot 2019-02-04
img

When Smugmug bought Flickr at the end of last year, folks who were using it as a repository for their photos received some bad news.

Instead of the 1TB of storage Flickr had been offering when it was owned by Yahoo, Smugmug changed that to a mere 1000 photos, unless of course you signed up for a Flickr Pro subscription, which runs $50 a year.

Those who don’t shell out for a Pro subscription will have their photos purged until they’re at the 1000 photo threshold, and that purge begins tomorrow.

Yes, if you haven’t taken measures to get your excess photos off of Flickr, tomorrow they’ll be deleted beginning with the oldest ones.

The good news is that you still have time to save your photos from oblivion, provided you’re willing to put up with some convoluted download methods.

As Gizmodo explains it, there are two ways to download your photos from Flickr.

Michael Ambriz 2021-06-17
img
"There's pain and daddy issues that exist beneath this," one source close to Giuliani told New York Magazine.
Johnny Huff 2021-05-13
img
Advisers to Shaun Donovan and Scott Stringer both told New York Magazine that they doubted Yang answered the questions without getting help.
John Murphy 2021-04-26
img
The streaming giant is reportedly in talks with acclaimed director David Fincher about a third season of Mindhunter.
Garland Marsella 2017-07-14
img

New York adds Sara Holdren as theater critic for New York magazine/Vulture and Ezekiel Kweku and Benjamin Hart to news and politics vertical Daily Intelligencer.

Holdren’s background is not in criticism, or even media, for that matter, but theater itself, where she has been artistic director and co-founder of Brooklyn-based theater company Tiltyard and has also served as theatre director on other productions.

“We were looking for a fresh, exciting voice, and we found her,” said New York magazine editor in chief Adam Moss in a statement.

“Sara never imagined herself a critic but she has the makings of a great one.

She comes at theater criticism from an unusual background and perspective, which will be helpful, but she also happens to be a wonderful critical writer–vivid, wry, interesting, impassioned.

We’re excited to welcome her to the dialogue.”

Robert Holloway 2020-09-19
img
Going back to school during the middle of the pandemic has me worried about my health, the health of my family, and the health of the country.
Peter Garvey 2018-04-26

New York Magazine’s The Cut is wading into the merchandise business.

For $24.99, white T-shirts modeled after The Cut’s Instagram quote cards, featuring phrases, headlines and pop culture references are now available on Amazon.

“We thought it was funny, basically.

Several of us said we’d love to make our own custom T-shirts and we thought Cut headlines could be fun and ironic when worn on a body instead of a headline in an article,” Stella Bugbee, president and editor in chief of The Cut, said.

Examples include: “Engagement Chicken” (as a nod to what Meghan Markle and Prince Harry were making the night he proposed), “The Wind Is A Very Deceiving Thing” (referencing President Trump’s quip about the force that ruffled his hair) and “Let Me Fat In Peace” (rapper Cardi B’s response to fans who—accurately—predicted she was pregnant).

“This is just an editorial approach but taken to a new medium, in this case, T-shirts,” Bugbee said.

Thomas Crain 2017-06-17
img

Amanda Yang is Director of Analytics at New York Magazine, where she works with editorial, development, and product to help make decisions using data.

Prior to New York Magazine, she worked at VICE Media as a data scientist and worked on projects to help understand brand safety, categorizing content, optimizing videos in search and better visualizing ad server information.

In her spare time, she enjoys working on her adventure van and taking it places to climb, run or whatever sounds fun.

You can follow her on Twitter: @amandamaiyang

She will be live on June 22 starting at 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which she will answer as many questions as possible.

Harvey Broughton 2021-05-14
img
The billionaire told New York Magazine that he couldn't pass on the chance to invest in cryptocurrencies.
Mark Alexander 2020-12-16
img

Posted by Dr-Pete

On December 3rd, Google announced that they were rolling out the latest Core Update. Initially, the bulk of the impact seemed to arrive on that date, with MozCast spiking at 112.4°F:

We measured above-average ranking flux in the three days prior to the update announcement, and a few days after the announcement, but the bulk of the flux seemed to occur on the roll-out day. (The dotted line represents the 30-day average prior to December 3rd.)

How did December 2020 compare to other Core Updates?

While technically the third largest named core update, Google's December Core Update was very close in measured impact to the May 2020 Core Update and the August 2018 "Medic" Update.

Winners and more winners

Back in May, I came down pretty hard on winners and losers reports. I don't want to discourage all core update analyses, but our rush to publish can produce misleading results, especially with multi-day updates. In May, I settled on a 7-day update analysis, comparing the full week before the update to the full week after. This helps better reflect multi-day roll-outs and also cleans up the noise of sites with naturally high flux, such as news sites (which often wax and wane on a weekly cycle).

Below are the top 20 overall winners in our MozCast data set, by percentage gain:

Note the 1-day comparisons (December 4th vs. December 2nd) vs. 7-day and in particular the orange values — five of our top 20 picked up considerably more gains after the bulk of the update hit. We also saw some reversals, but the majority of sites recorded their wins and losses early in this update.

Another challenge with winners and losers analyses is that it's easy for large percentage gains and losses from small sites to overshadow larger sites that might see much larger traffic and revenue impact. Here are the top 20 winners across the 100 largest sites in our tracking set:

Note that New York Magazine picked up considerably more gains after December 4th. Of course, for any given site, we can't prove these gains were due to the core update. While Apple's App Store was the big winner here, a handful of big sites saw gains over +20%, and eBay fared particularly well.

Winningest content / pages

We tend to focus on domain-level winners and losers, simply because grouping by domains gives us more data to work with, but we also know that many of Google's changes work at the page level. So, I decided to try something new and explore the winners among individual pages in our data set.

I stuck to the top 100 most visible pages in our data set, removed home pages, and then looked only at the 7-day (before vs. after) change. Here are the top 10 winners, along with their 7-day gain (I've opted for a text list, so that you can click through to these pages, if you'd like to explore):

  1. +126%https://www.cashnetusa.com/paydayloans.html
  2. +65%https://www.trulia.com/rent/
  3. +58%https://www.customink.com/products/t-shirts/4
  4. +53%https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/calculators/taxcaster/
  5. +41%https://www.whitepages.com/person
  6. +40%https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/gardening/advice/...
  7. +38%https://www.nerdwallet.com/mortgages/mortgage-rates
  8. +33%https://www.bankrate.com/calculators/mortgages/...
  9. +26%https://www.wellsfargo.com/mortgage/rates/
  10. +23%https://smartasset.com/mortgage/mortgage-calculator

It's interesting to note a number of shifts in financial services and especially around mortgage rates and calculators. Of course, we can't speak to causality. It's entirely possible that some of these pages moved up because competitors lost ground. For example, https://www.mortgagecalculator.org lost 23% of their visibility in the 7-day over 7-day comparison.

While it's interesting to explore these pages to look for common themes, please note that a short-term ranking gain doesn't necessarily mean that any given page is doing something right or was rewarded by the core update.

What trends are you seeing?

Now that the dust has mostly settled, are you seeing any clear trends? Are any specific types of pages performing better or worse than before? As an industry, analyzing Core Updates has a long way to go (and, to be fair, it's an incredibly complex problem), but I think what's critical is that we try to push a little harder each time and learn a little bit more. If you have any ideas on how to expand on these analyses, especially at a page level, let us know in the comments.


Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

Thomas Brazier 2021-07-09
img
New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz declined a $250,000 Substack newsletter deal, saying, "It is not my real work to write for 'subscribers.'"
Eddie Waldo 2019-03-11
img

New York Media has laid off 32 people, half of them were full-timers and were 5% of full-time staff.

The company behind the popular New York magazine was exploring options last year, including a sale.

The layoffs come at a punishing time for media generally, with BuzzFeed, HuffPost, Vice among those laying off staff this year.

New York Media, parent of the popular New York magazine and other online verticals including The Cut and Vulture, has laid off 32 people as it undergoes restructuring.

The family-owned company has undergone some upheaval recently in a tough time for print and online media generally.

It said last summer it was exploring options, including a sale.

Daniel Patel 2016-06-28
img

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has completely reinvented the way the Washington Post is run since buying the paper for $250 million in 2013.But the biggest change Bezos is bringing to the 140-year old paper may be in the way it's generating revenue: by selling software.According to a New York Magazine feature about the Washington Post on Tuesday, the Post is hoping to bring in $100 million in annual revenue by selling some of its software, including the content management system CMS used by its editorial staff to publish articles.Although it's still in its early days, with only about a dozen local papers using the CMS so far, the Post clearly sees the business of selling software as a potential new revenue source.

It just recently launched a new digital advertising platform which speeds up load time, while it's also built an internal data analytics system that can track every little detail of reader behavior online, the New York Magazine wrote.Establishing this new source of revenue would be critical for the long term success of the paper.

The Post is estimated to have generated $350 million in annual revenue, a significant drop from the $580 million in brought in in 2012, the report said.

Bezos also plans to cut the paper's $500 million budget by half within the next three years, it said.

We can t be an organization that loses gobs and gobs of money," Bezos told Shailesh Prakash, the Post's chief technology officer, the report said.Read the full New York Magazine story here.

Disclosure: Jeff Bezos is an investor in Business Insider through his

personal investment company Bezos Expeditions.NOW WATCH: How to use Facebook s awesome new 360-degree photo featureLoading video...