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Jason Vest 2016-11-02
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The super moon appears in the sky in Cairo, Egypt, October 17, 2016.

A new model for how the moon formed in the distant past suggests a dramatic, violent collision that altered the Earth s tilt and spin rate.

Today, the Earth is tilted just over 23 degrees compared to its orbital plane around the sun.

"Evidence suggests a giant impact blasted off a huge amount of material that formed the moon," Douglas Hamilton, a professor of astronomy at the University of Maryland and a co-author of the new study, said in a statement.

"This material would have formed a ring of debris first, then the ring would have aggregated to form the moon.

But this scenario does not quite work if Earth's spin axis was tilted at the 23.5 degree angle we see today."

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Gladys Wiggins 2017-06-27
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Uranus clenches after taking in hot beams

Scientists digging through old readings from NASA’s Voyager 2 mission in 1986 have found that Uranus’ magnetic field swings open and shut like the aperture of a revolving door.

Uranus doesn’t just have a funny name, it has a silly orbit too.

It’s the only planet in the Solar System to lie on its side – almost 98˚ from its plane of orbit around the Sun.

The incoming stream of energetic particles making up the solar wind flow strike Uranus’ magnetic field asymmetrically as the ice giant completes a full spin every in 17 hours and 14 minutes.

Carol Paty, associate professor at Georgia Tech and co-author of the study published this month in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, called the planet a “geometric nightmare”.

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Donald Broussard 2016-09-02
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Until a few days ago, scientists had no flipping idea what Jupiter s poles looked like.

But now, thanks to NASA s Juno spacecraft, which dropped into orbit around the distant gas giant on July 4th after a five-year solar-powered journey, scientists are seeing two sides of Jupiter they ve never seen before.

Turns out the view is pretty good: Jupiter s poles are gorgeous, cloudy, surprisingly blue, and chock full of science.

Earth is tipped over 23.5 degrees.

That makes its poles darn near impossible to see without a direct flyover, and previous missions to Jupiter have tended to fly in equatorial orbits.

NASA s Juno Probe Just Made It Safely Into Jupiter s Orbit

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0
Jason Vest 2016-11-02
img

The super moon appears in the sky in Cairo, Egypt, October 17, 2016.

A new model for how the moon formed in the distant past suggests a dramatic, violent collision that altered the Earth s tilt and spin rate.

Today, the Earth is tilted just over 23 degrees compared to its orbital plane around the sun.

"Evidence suggests a giant impact blasted off a huge amount of material that formed the moon," Douglas Hamilton, a professor of astronomy at the University of Maryland and a co-author of the new study, said in a statement.

"This material would have formed a ring of debris first, then the ring would have aggregated to form the moon.

But this scenario does not quite work if Earth's spin axis was tilted at the 23.5 degree angle we see today."

Donald Broussard 2016-09-02
img

Until a few days ago, scientists had no flipping idea what Jupiter s poles looked like.

But now, thanks to NASA s Juno spacecraft, which dropped into orbit around the distant gas giant on July 4th after a five-year solar-powered journey, scientists are seeing two sides of Jupiter they ve never seen before.

Turns out the view is pretty good: Jupiter s poles are gorgeous, cloudy, surprisingly blue, and chock full of science.

Earth is tipped over 23.5 degrees.

That makes its poles darn near impossible to see without a direct flyover, and previous missions to Jupiter have tended to fly in equatorial orbits.

NASA s Juno Probe Just Made It Safely Into Jupiter s Orbit

Gladys Wiggins 2017-06-27
img

Uranus clenches after taking in hot beams

Scientists digging through old readings from NASA’s Voyager 2 mission in 1986 have found that Uranus’ magnetic field swings open and shut like the aperture of a revolving door.

Uranus doesn’t just have a funny name, it has a silly orbit too.

It’s the only planet in the Solar System to lie on its side – almost 98˚ from its plane of orbit around the Sun.

The incoming stream of energetic particles making up the solar wind flow strike Uranus’ magnetic field asymmetrically as the ice giant completes a full spin every in 17 hours and 14 minutes.

Carol Paty, associate professor at Georgia Tech and co-author of the study published this month in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, called the planet a “geometric nightmare”.