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Earl Rizvi 2017-09-08
img

The Oyster card smartphone app has gone live thanks to TFL and Cubic systems.

Transport for London (TFL) and Cubic have announced the launch of a TFL mobile ticketing app for Oyster card users.

Designed by TFL and developed by Cubic, the mobile ticketing app will allow Oyster card users to monitor their travel and payments, top up their card balance and view journey history of up to eight weeks, on the go.

Customers can make pay-as-you-go, weekly, monthly or annual travel tickets at any time.

Once users have topped up their card, via their smartphone app, the balance can be added to their card after 30 minutes.

To add, customers simple touch their Oyster card on the card reader as customers pass through barriers at London Underground stations, Trams and TFL rail stations.

collect
0
David Bierman 2017-07-19
img

London's old contactless Oyster card technology has had its back ends tidied up, with a number of changes making it easier and faster to buy and add tickets to the system.

For a start, anyone buying things online through the card's web site should now be able to have their tickets and travelcards automatically transferred to their cards when they tap in at any train station, a system vastly more user friendly than the old method of having to nominate a particular station for a pick up.

Tickets should also be ready for use 30 minutes after purchase now too, replacing the old maximum wait of 24 hours for digital travelcards to be delivered.

Later in the year it'll be possible to collect travelcards from the card reader terminals on the buses too, with a new TfL app coming in August to handle top-ups and ticket purchases from smartphones, view PAYG credit and loaded tickets, and ping out notifications should the balance reach a critical, you're-getting-done, level.

Other small tweaks are also on the way to the neglected Oyster card, with the "Hopper" hourly charge caps and weekly limits coming soon to bus and tram trips -- and a Journey History set to be added to the TfL app by early 2018.

collect
0
John Murphy 2016-07-14
img

A London fashion student has invented the world s first Oyster Card nails.

Lucie Davis created the ingenious wearable tech as part of her BA in jewellery design at Central Saint Martins.

Not only is the nail art inspired by the Oyster Card design, you can use the press-on nails instead of your travelcard.

That s because one of the acrylic nails contains a tiny RFID Radio-frequency identification chip linked to your Oyster account.

Talk about having the city at your fingertips.

The idea came about when Davis was asked to create a project inspired by engaging with her daily surroundings, and immediately thought of her morning commute.

collect
0
Wayne Chapple 2016-07-22
img

A jewelry design graduate from London has come up with an ingenious alternative to carrying around and using an Oyster Card — the credit card-sized, prepaid travel ticket used for all forms of London transportation.

Instead, Lucie Davis uses her finger nails.

It s wearable tech, but not as we know it.

Hidden inside an Oyster Card is an RFID chip, and it s tapped against a reader at the station to pay for a journey.

Davis took her card apart, removed the chip, and then embedded it inside a set of false acrylic nails.

Her Oyster nail replicates the functionality exactly, just without the hassle of digging around for the card, or forgetting it on the kitchen table.

collect
0
Juan Hackwell 2016-06-14
img

CTS is most commonly known for its fare collection systems, which includes London s Oyster card and New York s MetroCard, among others.

Microsoft s Azure cloud will supposedly allow CTS to analyze much more data in a shorter time period, leading to powerful solutions to congestion.

NextTraffic will be able to change traffic light changes, adjust speed limits, and potentially divert traffic to new routes.

This strategic relationship will be beneficial for both companies as we build on CTS expertise in payment and information systems for public transportation and traffic management and Microsoft s world-leading enterprise solutions.

Real-time data in transport a relatively new concept

CTS is a leader in transport systems, but the ability to change traffic systems in real-time is a relatively new idea.

Smart city transportation solutions have the potential to improve traffic patterns, reduce congestion, contribute to economic growth and revolutionize city planning, all while improving the quality of transportation around the city, said Toni Townes-Whitley, corporate vice president of worldwide public sector for Microsoft.

collect
0
William Ly 2019-02-27
img

The Citymapper Pass we reported on last week has opened up to early signups this morning, and it's an interesting proposition.

While the plan is eventually to let you use the contactless card worldwide instead of trying to figure out local transport fares while you're on holiday, for the time being it's only available in London.

It launches fully in March, but some early birds were able to get access via the Citymapper app today, while others have only been able to register their interest for the big launch.

The Pass aims to simplify travel, according to an extremely wordy Medium post by the company.

It's an "all you can eat" subscription to London transport, but that currently only includes public transport (tube, bus, rail etc) in zones 1 and 2, Santander 'Boris' bikes and limited travel on Citymapper Rides, its own Uber Pool competitor.

The Super Pass costs £31 a week and gives you unlimited public transport in zones 1 and 2, with travel outside those areas being PAYG.

collect
0
Troy Schindler 2016-07-15
img

Design student Lucie Davis has put London at her fingertips, literally, with her Oyster-activated nails that can be used to touch in and out of the Underground thanks to an ingeniously placed microchip.

The nails were created as part of Davis' BA in BA in jewellery design at UAL's Central Saint Martins and were showcased at the end of year show.

The inspiration for the Oyster nails came as part of a project that challenged the students to find extraordinary ideas from everyday events and Davis immediately thought about her daily commute.

"These ideas just kept popping up as I was experience my daily routine," said Davis.

"You get so immersed in it, it's an intimate, active thing – that's what I want to get across."

luciedavis 3 weeks ago Follow luciedaviscsminnovationtransportforlondoncsm news 352 likes 46 comments Instagram

collect
0
Jeffrey Zambrana 2017-09-25

At the train station of the future, your face could be your ticket and gates could be invisible.

Cubic Transportation Systems, the US company behind London’s Oyster card technology, is working on new ticketing systems that use facial recognition, palm vein scanning and object tracking in a bid to cut down queues.

“The ridership on public transportation is due to grow,” says Dave Roat, strategy manager at Cubic.

“How do we deal with the growth in capacity and help enable passenger flow through stations?”

One of the problems Cubic is trying to solve is the bottleneck that occurs at ticket gates when everyone rushes to dig out their ticket or pass.

As with existing machines, this validator accepts Oyster cards and contactless cards, but it also works with some alternative payment methods: Bluetooth LTE (which could identify passengers by their phone as they pass through, without them needing to hold it on the scanner), palm vein scan and facial recognition.

collect
0
Shane Higgins 2016-07-29
img

Transport for London has picked up criticism after data revealed that it pocketed £277 million from passengers making incomplete journeys between 2011 and 2015.

Just £72 million was refunded over the same period.

Consumer rights group Revolver has accused the transport body of taking advantage of uncertainty amongst customers, with a spokesperson saying, This is another example of the transport industry profiting from consumer confusion.

Excessive effort is put into excess fares and charging but not into ensuring pricing is plain and simple, or that we get back what we are owed.

Incomplete journeys can incur a penalty fare of up to £8.90 per rail journey, and tend to happen when customers fail to tap in out with their Oyster card or contactless payment card, or smartphone, or smartwatch, or homemade wand .

However, while some people no doubt deliberately try to dodge fairs, others can simply be caught out through no fault of their own.

collect
0
Troy Schindler 2016-09-28
img

It looks like Mastercard really wants people to pay for things with their phones.

Earlier this year it gave Apple Pay users the chance to use London Public Transport free of charge, and now that same offer will be available to everyone with Android Pay.

So if you have a UK Mastercard loaded into Android Pay, you might want to pencil 3rd, 10th, 17th, and 24th of October into your diary.

The offer covers travel by bus, tube, Overground, DLR, TfL, select National Rail services, and even the Emirates cable car nobody actually uses.

All you have to do is clock in and out with your phone, just like you would with an Oyster card.

If that wasn't enough, Mastercard has also teamed up with Café Nero to offer Android Pay customers a free hot drink on the same days.

collect
0
Robert Massaro 2016-07-29
img

Transport for London has picked up criticism after data revealed that it pocketed £277 million from passengers making incomplete journeys between 2011 and 2015.

Just £72 million was refunded over the same period.

Consumer rights group Revolver has accused the transport body of taking advantage of uncertainty amongst customers, with a spokesperson saying, This is another example of the transport industry profiting from consumer confusion.

Excessive effort is put into excess fares and charging but not into ensuring pricing is plain and simple, or that we get back what we are owed.

Incomplete journeys can incur a penalty fare of up to £8.90 per rail journey, and tend to happen when customers fail to tap in out with their Oyster card or contactless payment card, or smartphone, or smartwatch, or homemade wand .

However, while some people no doubt deliberately try to dodge fairs, others can simply be caught out through no fault of their own.

collect
0
Brendon Dwelle 2018-11-28
img

Adidas loves its trainer collaborations, and despite having done one with Transport for London just a month ago to celebrate the fifteenth anniversary of the Oyster card, they've somehow prepared another entire line of tube shoes.

This one includes a shoe for every underground line, and ones for the Elizabeth Line (aka Crossrail) too.

However, like the last lot, and like the weaksauce Game of Thrones collab they did recently, the new tube trainers are really subtle.

We genuinely don't get the point of making things like this unless it's obvious to other people what the design is supposed to represent.

Sure, YOU know you're wearing Hammersmith and City Line kicks on the Jubilee line (lol bants) but no one else does, they just look like trainers.

For some reason, a lot of the pairs are made up of two lines, one shoe for each – and the pairs make pretty much no sense.

collect
0
Pedro Cote 2019-08-27
img

About your data breach the other day, lads...

Transport for London is looking at ways to improve its processes after a Register reader queried why he was being asked to write down his password on a paper form for railway staff to read.

London-dwelling Alfie Fresta wanted a National Rail travelcard discount added to his London Oyster card so the discount would work automatically with his pay-as-you-go smartcard.

He was startled when London Overground staff at New Cross Gate station handed him a paper form with a box on it asking for his online Oyster account password.

"I was in utter disbelief," Fresta told El Reg, having just read about Oyster online accounts being breached by credential-stuffing crooks.

"Having worked on a number of web apps, I know storing passwords in clear text is, for lack of a better word, a ginormous no-no."

collect
0
Marc Anderson 2017-12-19
img

Already a vibrant city famed for its iconic Golden Gate Bridge, hilly streets, painted ladies, and quirky dive bars, the enigma of the nearby Silicon Valley has lured countless tech-savvy and ambitious millennials.

He spends four days working in San Francisco and one day a week in Mountain View, Silicon Valley, when he visits Potato's client Google.

According to Carey, there are many things about living in the Bay — and working in Silicon Valley — that aren't what you'd expect from a global tech hub.

San Francisco's climate is generally pretty mild, but temperatures in and around the city can vary dramatically from block to block.

You can easily pay about $1,000 a month in rent for one half of a bunk bed.

The city isn't huge, but commuter traffic is thick.

collect
0
David Shiner 2017-07-20
img

It's called "Night Rider" and it will operate a small East London route from the end of August this year.

The route is designed to fill in a gap the company had spotted from the use of its mapping app and will run from Aldgate East Station and Highbury & Islington Station.

The new route is the result of Citymapper's previous trial, the CMX1, where it ran free buses on a circular route around the capital.

The route will only operate at weekends and will run from 9pm until 5am but is fully approved by TFL and run by Tower Transit.

As you might expect there's a lot of tech going into the bus too, it will know how full it is and of course any delays thanks to vomiting and/or weird late night weekend traffic.

And while Citymapper is new to the bus game, Tower Transit is not, currently operating hot favourite routes like 25, 30, 58, 69, 212, 236, 308 and not forgetting that classic, the 339.

collect
0
Larry Johnson 2016-12-09
img

What s actually going on behind the blue hoardings that snake across London?

Here I am standing in what will soon be the trackbed.

The railway is being designed to last 100 years though it will surely last longer , and given that London s population is seemingly ever increasing, the engineers aren t cutting corners.

Crossrail is being built for full size trains, and tunnels are a full 6.2m in diameter - much larger than the 3.56m standard for the existing deep-level Tube tunnels.

And amusingly, Crossrail trains come close to being longer than the gap between the two closest Tube stations: Leicester Square and Covent Garden on the Piccadilly Line are only 260m apart.

When train services launch in 2018, the central section will have 24 trains per hour tph pass through - that s one every 2.5 minutes.

collect
0
Earl Rizvi 2017-09-08
img

The Oyster card smartphone app has gone live thanks to TFL and Cubic systems.

Transport for London (TFL) and Cubic have announced the launch of a TFL mobile ticketing app for Oyster card users.

Designed by TFL and developed by Cubic, the mobile ticketing app will allow Oyster card users to monitor their travel and payments, top up their card balance and view journey history of up to eight weeks, on the go.

Customers can make pay-as-you-go, weekly, monthly or annual travel tickets at any time.

Once users have topped up their card, via their smartphone app, the balance can be added to their card after 30 minutes.

To add, customers simple touch their Oyster card on the card reader as customers pass through barriers at London Underground stations, Trams and TFL rail stations.

John Murphy 2016-07-14
img

A London fashion student has invented the world s first Oyster Card nails.

Lucie Davis created the ingenious wearable tech as part of her BA in jewellery design at Central Saint Martins.

Not only is the nail art inspired by the Oyster Card design, you can use the press-on nails instead of your travelcard.

That s because one of the acrylic nails contains a tiny RFID Radio-frequency identification chip linked to your Oyster account.

Talk about having the city at your fingertips.

The idea came about when Davis was asked to create a project inspired by engaging with her daily surroundings, and immediately thought of her morning commute.

Juan Hackwell 2016-06-14
img

CTS is most commonly known for its fare collection systems, which includes London s Oyster card and New York s MetroCard, among others.

Microsoft s Azure cloud will supposedly allow CTS to analyze much more data in a shorter time period, leading to powerful solutions to congestion.

NextTraffic will be able to change traffic light changes, adjust speed limits, and potentially divert traffic to new routes.

This strategic relationship will be beneficial for both companies as we build on CTS expertise in payment and information systems for public transportation and traffic management and Microsoft s world-leading enterprise solutions.

Real-time data in transport a relatively new concept

CTS is a leader in transport systems, but the ability to change traffic systems in real-time is a relatively new idea.

Smart city transportation solutions have the potential to improve traffic patterns, reduce congestion, contribute to economic growth and revolutionize city planning, all while improving the quality of transportation around the city, said Toni Townes-Whitley, corporate vice president of worldwide public sector for Microsoft.

Troy Schindler 2016-07-15
img

Design student Lucie Davis has put London at her fingertips, literally, with her Oyster-activated nails that can be used to touch in and out of the Underground thanks to an ingeniously placed microchip.

The nails were created as part of Davis' BA in BA in jewellery design at UAL's Central Saint Martins and were showcased at the end of year show.

The inspiration for the Oyster nails came as part of a project that challenged the students to find extraordinary ideas from everyday events and Davis immediately thought about her daily commute.

"These ideas just kept popping up as I was experience my daily routine," said Davis.

"You get so immersed in it, it's an intimate, active thing – that's what I want to get across."

luciedavis 3 weeks ago Follow luciedaviscsminnovationtransportforlondoncsm news 352 likes 46 comments Instagram

Shane Higgins 2016-07-29
img

Transport for London has picked up criticism after data revealed that it pocketed £277 million from passengers making incomplete journeys between 2011 and 2015.

Just £72 million was refunded over the same period.

Consumer rights group Revolver has accused the transport body of taking advantage of uncertainty amongst customers, with a spokesperson saying, This is another example of the transport industry profiting from consumer confusion.

Excessive effort is put into excess fares and charging but not into ensuring pricing is plain and simple, or that we get back what we are owed.

Incomplete journeys can incur a penalty fare of up to £8.90 per rail journey, and tend to happen when customers fail to tap in out with their Oyster card or contactless payment card, or smartphone, or smartwatch, or homemade wand .

However, while some people no doubt deliberately try to dodge fairs, others can simply be caught out through no fault of their own.

Robert Massaro 2016-07-29
img

Transport for London has picked up criticism after data revealed that it pocketed £277 million from passengers making incomplete journeys between 2011 and 2015.

Just £72 million was refunded over the same period.

Consumer rights group Revolver has accused the transport body of taking advantage of uncertainty amongst customers, with a spokesperson saying, This is another example of the transport industry profiting from consumer confusion.

Excessive effort is put into excess fares and charging but not into ensuring pricing is plain and simple, or that we get back what we are owed.

Incomplete journeys can incur a penalty fare of up to £8.90 per rail journey, and tend to happen when customers fail to tap in out with their Oyster card or contactless payment card, or smartphone, or smartwatch, or homemade wand .

However, while some people no doubt deliberately try to dodge fairs, others can simply be caught out through no fault of their own.

Pedro Cote 2019-08-27
img

About your data breach the other day, lads...

Transport for London is looking at ways to improve its processes after a Register reader queried why he was being asked to write down his password on a paper form for railway staff to read.

London-dwelling Alfie Fresta wanted a National Rail travelcard discount added to his London Oyster card so the discount would work automatically with his pay-as-you-go smartcard.

He was startled when London Overground staff at New Cross Gate station handed him a paper form with a box on it asking for his online Oyster account password.

"I was in utter disbelief," Fresta told El Reg, having just read about Oyster online accounts being breached by credential-stuffing crooks.

"Having worked on a number of web apps, I know storing passwords in clear text is, for lack of a better word, a ginormous no-no."

David Shiner 2017-07-20
img

It's called "Night Rider" and it will operate a small East London route from the end of August this year.

The route is designed to fill in a gap the company had spotted from the use of its mapping app and will run from Aldgate East Station and Highbury & Islington Station.

The new route is the result of Citymapper's previous trial, the CMX1, where it ran free buses on a circular route around the capital.

The route will only operate at weekends and will run from 9pm until 5am but is fully approved by TFL and run by Tower Transit.

As you might expect there's a lot of tech going into the bus too, it will know how full it is and of course any delays thanks to vomiting and/or weird late night weekend traffic.

And while Citymapper is new to the bus game, Tower Transit is not, currently operating hot favourite routes like 25, 30, 58, 69, 212, 236, 308 and not forgetting that classic, the 339.

David Bierman 2017-07-19
img

London's old contactless Oyster card technology has had its back ends tidied up, with a number of changes making it easier and faster to buy and add tickets to the system.

For a start, anyone buying things online through the card's web site should now be able to have their tickets and travelcards automatically transferred to their cards when they tap in at any train station, a system vastly more user friendly than the old method of having to nominate a particular station for a pick up.

Tickets should also be ready for use 30 minutes after purchase now too, replacing the old maximum wait of 24 hours for digital travelcards to be delivered.

Later in the year it'll be possible to collect travelcards from the card reader terminals on the buses too, with a new TfL app coming in August to handle top-ups and ticket purchases from smartphones, view PAYG credit and loaded tickets, and ping out notifications should the balance reach a critical, you're-getting-done, level.

Other small tweaks are also on the way to the neglected Oyster card, with the "Hopper" hourly charge caps and weekly limits coming soon to bus and tram trips -- and a Journey History set to be added to the TfL app by early 2018.

Wayne Chapple 2016-07-22
img

A jewelry design graduate from London has come up with an ingenious alternative to carrying around and using an Oyster Card — the credit card-sized, prepaid travel ticket used for all forms of London transportation.

Instead, Lucie Davis uses her finger nails.

It s wearable tech, but not as we know it.

Hidden inside an Oyster Card is an RFID chip, and it s tapped against a reader at the station to pay for a journey.

Davis took her card apart, removed the chip, and then embedded it inside a set of false acrylic nails.

Her Oyster nail replicates the functionality exactly, just without the hassle of digging around for the card, or forgetting it on the kitchen table.

William Ly 2019-02-27
img

The Citymapper Pass we reported on last week has opened up to early signups this morning, and it's an interesting proposition.

While the plan is eventually to let you use the contactless card worldwide instead of trying to figure out local transport fares while you're on holiday, for the time being it's only available in London.

It launches fully in March, but some early birds were able to get access via the Citymapper app today, while others have only been able to register their interest for the big launch.

The Pass aims to simplify travel, according to an extremely wordy Medium post by the company.

It's an "all you can eat" subscription to London transport, but that currently only includes public transport (tube, bus, rail etc) in zones 1 and 2, Santander 'Boris' bikes and limited travel on Citymapper Rides, its own Uber Pool competitor.

The Super Pass costs £31 a week and gives you unlimited public transport in zones 1 and 2, with travel outside those areas being PAYG.

Jeffrey Zambrana 2017-09-25

At the train station of the future, your face could be your ticket and gates could be invisible.

Cubic Transportation Systems, the US company behind London’s Oyster card technology, is working on new ticketing systems that use facial recognition, palm vein scanning and object tracking in a bid to cut down queues.

“The ridership on public transportation is due to grow,” says Dave Roat, strategy manager at Cubic.

“How do we deal with the growth in capacity and help enable passenger flow through stations?”

One of the problems Cubic is trying to solve is the bottleneck that occurs at ticket gates when everyone rushes to dig out their ticket or pass.

As with existing machines, this validator accepts Oyster cards and contactless cards, but it also works with some alternative payment methods: Bluetooth LTE (which could identify passengers by their phone as they pass through, without them needing to hold it on the scanner), palm vein scan and facial recognition.

Troy Schindler 2016-09-28
img

It looks like Mastercard really wants people to pay for things with their phones.

Earlier this year it gave Apple Pay users the chance to use London Public Transport free of charge, and now that same offer will be available to everyone with Android Pay.

So if you have a UK Mastercard loaded into Android Pay, you might want to pencil 3rd, 10th, 17th, and 24th of October into your diary.

The offer covers travel by bus, tube, Overground, DLR, TfL, select National Rail services, and even the Emirates cable car nobody actually uses.

All you have to do is clock in and out with your phone, just like you would with an Oyster card.

If that wasn't enough, Mastercard has also teamed up with Café Nero to offer Android Pay customers a free hot drink on the same days.

Brendon Dwelle 2018-11-28
img

Adidas loves its trainer collaborations, and despite having done one with Transport for London just a month ago to celebrate the fifteenth anniversary of the Oyster card, they've somehow prepared another entire line of tube shoes.

This one includes a shoe for every underground line, and ones for the Elizabeth Line (aka Crossrail) too.

However, like the last lot, and like the weaksauce Game of Thrones collab they did recently, the new tube trainers are really subtle.

We genuinely don't get the point of making things like this unless it's obvious to other people what the design is supposed to represent.

Sure, YOU know you're wearing Hammersmith and City Line kicks on the Jubilee line (lol bants) but no one else does, they just look like trainers.

For some reason, a lot of the pairs are made up of two lines, one shoe for each – and the pairs make pretty much no sense.

Marc Anderson 2017-12-19
img

Already a vibrant city famed for its iconic Golden Gate Bridge, hilly streets, painted ladies, and quirky dive bars, the enigma of the nearby Silicon Valley has lured countless tech-savvy and ambitious millennials.

He spends four days working in San Francisco and one day a week in Mountain View, Silicon Valley, when he visits Potato's client Google.

According to Carey, there are many things about living in the Bay — and working in Silicon Valley — that aren't what you'd expect from a global tech hub.

San Francisco's climate is generally pretty mild, but temperatures in and around the city can vary dramatically from block to block.

You can easily pay about $1,000 a month in rent for one half of a bunk bed.

The city isn't huge, but commuter traffic is thick.

Larry Johnson 2016-12-09
img

What s actually going on behind the blue hoardings that snake across London?

Here I am standing in what will soon be the trackbed.

The railway is being designed to last 100 years though it will surely last longer , and given that London s population is seemingly ever increasing, the engineers aren t cutting corners.

Crossrail is being built for full size trains, and tunnels are a full 6.2m in diameter - much larger than the 3.56m standard for the existing deep-level Tube tunnels.

And amusingly, Crossrail trains come close to being longer than the gap between the two closest Tube stations: Leicester Square and Covent Garden on the Piccadilly Line are only 260m apart.

When train services launch in 2018, the central section will have 24 trains per hour tph pass through - that s one every 2.5 minutes.