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Michael Hurlock 2016-07-01
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Scientists at MIT and other locations have been eyeing the hole in the ozone layer since it came to the forefront in the '80s.

The fear when the hole in the ozone layer was first discovered was that it might lead to harm for humans around the world since we need the ozone layer to protect us from all sorts of deadly things that come from space.

The good news is that scientists have announced that the ozone layer hole has shrunk significantly since 2000.

According to the team of scientists, the ozone hole has shrunk by more than 4 million square kilometers since 2000.

To put 4 million square kilometers in perspective a bit, that it about how large half the area of the contiguous US is.

Scientists have also noted that the healing of the ozone layer hole has also slowed for the first time and the finger is pointed at volcanic eruptions.

collect
0
Appsinvo Pvt Ltd 2020-09-16
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The only thing that prevents the earth from getting fired is the ozone layer.

Protect the ozone layer to protect yourself.

!Follow Us onAppsinvo | Behance | Facebook | Instagram  | Linkedin | Dribbble | Twitter | Tumblr | Pinterest | Flickr

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0
Joshua Herbert 2017-11-03
img

This is a modal window.

No compatible source was found for this media.

The hole in the ozone layer is at its lowest since 1988 and warmer climates could be the reason behind reduced depletion of the protective layer in the Earth's atmosphere, Nasa has found.

The ozone layer's depletion reaches a peak around September to October every year when winter comes to an end in the southern hemisphere, says Nasa.

Ozone depletion occurs during colder climates and this year, the hole was at its widest on 11 September and covered an area of 7.6 million square miles which, according to Nasa, is two and a half times the land area of the US.

By mid-September and through October, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through its ground and balloon-based measurements found that the ozone began to recover.

collect
0
William Jones 2017-11-02
img

If you were around in the '80s, you might recall the widespread fear over the discovery of a massive hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica.

It's still there, but NASA says 2017 delivered a daintier hole than usual.

The ozone layer acts as a protective shroud over the Earth, blocking out ultraviolet radiation.

NASA likens it to an atmospheric version of sunscreen.

Our planet wouldn't be habitable without the ozone layer to help protect us from the sun.

NASA and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have been monitoring the ozone hole since it was first discovered in 1985.

collect
0
Michael Rase 2016-06-30

The Ozone layer reached a maximum in 2006

The hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic has begun to shrink as a result of a ban on some pollutants, scientists believe.

A study found that the hole has reduced in size by 1.5 million square miles four million square kilometres since the year 2000.

The reduction - an area the size of India - came as a surprise to experts as they thought the hole was getting bigger.

It became apparent after they took into account the damage to the ozone layer caused by a volcanic eruption.

Susan Solomon, the study's lead author, said: "It's a big surprise.

collect
0
Jimmy Richmond 2017-08-16
img

In 1989, amidst mounting scientific evidence, dozens of nations joined forces to sign a treaty aimed at halting the expansion of a massive hole in Earth’s ozone layer.

Nearly thirty years later, the Montreal Protocol has done just that.

That’s the surprising conclusion of a study published this week in Geophysical Research Letters, which takes a fresh look at the consequences of the nearly 30-year-old treaty that phased out chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and later, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), after scientists determined that these compounds were destroying ozone in Earth’s stratosphere.

Since CFCs and HCFCs are also potent greenhouse gases, phasing them out has had a major impact on US climate pollution: Between 2008 and 2014, the Montreal Protocol led to greenhouse gas reductions with roughly half the benefit of all other climate regulations enacted by the EPA.

“This is something that’s been talked about for a while, this dual benefit of the Montreal Protocol limiting damage to the ozone layer, also curtailing climate change,” Rachel Cleetus, climate policy manager and lead economist with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned scientists, told Gizmodo.

“It’s because all these ozone depleting substances are also very potent global warming gases.”

collect
0
Stephen Somogyi 2020-10-23
img
The hole in the ozone layer keeps coming back to haunt us.
collect
0
Timothy Guardado 2021-05-03
img
Hydrofluorocarbons saved the ozone layer, but they’re killing the climate.
collect
0
Richard Skaggs 2018-01-05
img

Ozone depletion is on the decline, according to NASA, which has announced that scientists have demonstrated a particular aspect of this via a satellite instrument for the first time.

According to the instrument, which was made by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, chlorine atom levels are decreasing and with that comes a decrease in their destruction of the ozone layer.

The favorable change is the direct result of international bans on chlorofluorocarbons, NASA says.

Chlorofluorocarbons, more commonly referred to as CFCs, is a type of chemical produced by humans that has a harmful effect on the ozone layer.

An international ban on CFCs is aimed at protecting the ozone layer, and this new data proves that it is working.

In a recent release, NASA explained that the Antarctic winter has seen a 20-percent decrease in ozone depletion versus what was observed in 2005.

collect
0
Carl Fox 2018-05-30
img

There may be a natural explanation as to why ozone concentrations in the lower stratosphere has decreased, according to a study of Nasa satellite data.

Ozone is found naturally in the atmosphere and protects us from dangerous radiation.

What is known as the ozone layer is the layer of ozone is at about 10-50 km altitude, which protects us against the harmful UV the radiation.

If the ozone layer is damaged, it can affect our ecosystems negatively, among other things, reducing crop yields and disruptions in the food chain in the sea as a consequence.

Between the years 1998 and 2016 have ozone concentrations in the lower stratosphere from the tropics to the 60:th latitude, declined.

A theory from forskarhåll has been that this is due to the release of klorflorkarboner, among other in the paint.

collect
0
Sonic Soak 2019-08-23
img

Eco friendly cleaning products are an important part of our life because of the following facts:  The cleaning products are made up of toxic chemicals that harm the environment.

These toxic chemicals get mixed with air when we use them in cleaning so as a result the air gets polluted.

And we breathe the chemical air which leads to major health issues.

Normal cleaning products contain elements that have properties of destroying the environment to an extent that it can majorly damage our ozone layer.

And if the ozone layer depletes then we won’t be able to survive. 

collect
0
Carl Dechant 2021-06-05
img
New aviation technologies include a halon-free fire-extinguishing agent that reduces effects on the ozone layer, engine nacelle designed to reduce noise, and cabin sidewalls made of recycled materials
collect
0
Richard Skaggs 2018-05-16
img

A chemical banned due to the harm it causes the ozone layer may be secretly in production somewhere in the world.

Scientists speculate the illicit compound may be in use despite the ban due to increased levels, its presence ultimately harming efforts to restore the Earth’s atmosphere.

Some scientists speculate that the substance is likely being produced in East Asia.

The issue involves a gas called CFC-11, a chlorofluorocarbon that contributes to the depletion of the ozone layer.

Use of the chemical was banned in 2010 via the Montreal Protocol, an international agreement made to protect the environment.

In the years since, chlorofluorocarbons have decreased in measurements, a key success in efforts to reverse damage caused by human activity.

collect
0
William Ly 2016-07-01
img

The reason we're seeing this reversal seems largely due to the Montreal Protocol, which banned the use of CFCs in 1987.

For those who don't know, CFCs release chlorine atoms when they're hit by ultraviolent light, which eats away at the ozone layer and is the reason the hole over Antartica grows during the continent's summer months and shrinks during the winter.

This is not only great news for the environment, but it's also an encouraging development for the efforts against climate change.

Flex Schedules for Adult Students.

Don't get it wrong: the ozone hole is still there and it's still pretty massive, but the healing we're seeing is in line with what we expected when CFCs were initially banned.

Now, 30 years after recognizing the measures we needed to take to solve the ozone problem, we're talking about the possibility of this gigantic hole in the ozone layer sealing itself back up within our lifetimes.

collect
0
Randy Rowald 2018-01-04
img

The Montreal Protocol, which went into effect in 1989, is a rare instance of a global agreement to solve a global problem: the release of vast quantities of ozone-destroying chemicals into the atmosphere.

In the decades since, however, changes in ozone have been small and variable, making it hard to tell whether the protocol is making any difference.

But evidence has been building that the ozone layer is recovering, and a new paper claims to have directly measured the ozone hole gradually filling back in.

During the 1970s and '80s, evidence had been building that a class of industrial chemicals, the chloro-flurocarbons (CFCs), were damaging the ozone layer, a region of the stratosphere rich in this reactive form of oxygen.

The ozone hole spurred countries and companies into action.

As companies developed replacements for CFCs, countries negotiated an international agreement that would limit and phase out their use.

collect
0
Charles Houston 2016-07-01
img

The hole over the ozone layer is finally healing according to new research by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

A team in Boston reported the first fingerprints of healing in a paper released to the journal Science.

The September ozone hole has reportedly shrunk by 4 million square kilometers since 2000, when ozone depletion was recorded at its peak.

Findings attribute this positive development to the decline in usage of chlorofluorocarbons CFCs – a chemical compound previously found in dry cleaning processes, old white goods and aerosols.

Undoubtedly the Montreal Protocol has had a huge role to play in this change as it banned the use of CFCs when 46 countries signed it in 1987.

Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at MIT said: We can now be confident that the things we ve done have put the planet on a path to heal…which is pretty good for us, isn t it?

collect
0
Michael Hurlock 2016-07-01
img

Scientists at MIT and other locations have been eyeing the hole in the ozone layer since it came to the forefront in the '80s.

The fear when the hole in the ozone layer was first discovered was that it might lead to harm for humans around the world since we need the ozone layer to protect us from all sorts of deadly things that come from space.

The good news is that scientists have announced that the ozone layer hole has shrunk significantly since 2000.

According to the team of scientists, the ozone hole has shrunk by more than 4 million square kilometers since 2000.

To put 4 million square kilometers in perspective a bit, that it about how large half the area of the contiguous US is.

Scientists have also noted that the healing of the ozone layer hole has also slowed for the first time and the finger is pointed at volcanic eruptions.

Joshua Herbert 2017-11-03
img

This is a modal window.

No compatible source was found for this media.

The hole in the ozone layer is at its lowest since 1988 and warmer climates could be the reason behind reduced depletion of the protective layer in the Earth's atmosphere, Nasa has found.

The ozone layer's depletion reaches a peak around September to October every year when winter comes to an end in the southern hemisphere, says Nasa.

Ozone depletion occurs during colder climates and this year, the hole was at its widest on 11 September and covered an area of 7.6 million square miles which, according to Nasa, is two and a half times the land area of the US.

By mid-September and through October, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through its ground and balloon-based measurements found that the ozone began to recover.

Michael Rase 2016-06-30

The Ozone layer reached a maximum in 2006

The hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic has begun to shrink as a result of a ban on some pollutants, scientists believe.

A study found that the hole has reduced in size by 1.5 million square miles four million square kilometres since the year 2000.

The reduction - an area the size of India - came as a surprise to experts as they thought the hole was getting bigger.

It became apparent after they took into account the damage to the ozone layer caused by a volcanic eruption.

Susan Solomon, the study's lead author, said: "It's a big surprise.

Stephen Somogyi 2020-10-23
img
The hole in the ozone layer keeps coming back to haunt us.
Richard Skaggs 2018-01-05
img

Ozone depletion is on the decline, according to NASA, which has announced that scientists have demonstrated a particular aspect of this via a satellite instrument for the first time.

According to the instrument, which was made by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, chlorine atom levels are decreasing and with that comes a decrease in their destruction of the ozone layer.

The favorable change is the direct result of international bans on chlorofluorocarbons, NASA says.

Chlorofluorocarbons, more commonly referred to as CFCs, is a type of chemical produced by humans that has a harmful effect on the ozone layer.

An international ban on CFCs is aimed at protecting the ozone layer, and this new data proves that it is working.

In a recent release, NASA explained that the Antarctic winter has seen a 20-percent decrease in ozone depletion versus what was observed in 2005.

Sonic Soak 2019-08-23
img

Eco friendly cleaning products are an important part of our life because of the following facts:  The cleaning products are made up of toxic chemicals that harm the environment.

These toxic chemicals get mixed with air when we use them in cleaning so as a result the air gets polluted.

And we breathe the chemical air which leads to major health issues.

Normal cleaning products contain elements that have properties of destroying the environment to an extent that it can majorly damage our ozone layer.

And if the ozone layer depletes then we won’t be able to survive. 

Richard Skaggs 2018-05-16
img

A chemical banned due to the harm it causes the ozone layer may be secretly in production somewhere in the world.

Scientists speculate the illicit compound may be in use despite the ban due to increased levels, its presence ultimately harming efforts to restore the Earth’s atmosphere.

Some scientists speculate that the substance is likely being produced in East Asia.

The issue involves a gas called CFC-11, a chlorofluorocarbon that contributes to the depletion of the ozone layer.

Use of the chemical was banned in 2010 via the Montreal Protocol, an international agreement made to protect the environment.

In the years since, chlorofluorocarbons have decreased in measurements, a key success in efforts to reverse damage caused by human activity.

Randy Rowald 2018-01-04
img

The Montreal Protocol, which went into effect in 1989, is a rare instance of a global agreement to solve a global problem: the release of vast quantities of ozone-destroying chemicals into the atmosphere.

In the decades since, however, changes in ozone have been small and variable, making it hard to tell whether the protocol is making any difference.

But evidence has been building that the ozone layer is recovering, and a new paper claims to have directly measured the ozone hole gradually filling back in.

During the 1970s and '80s, evidence had been building that a class of industrial chemicals, the chloro-flurocarbons (CFCs), were damaging the ozone layer, a region of the stratosphere rich in this reactive form of oxygen.

The ozone hole spurred countries and companies into action.

As companies developed replacements for CFCs, countries negotiated an international agreement that would limit and phase out their use.

Appsinvo Pvt Ltd 2020-09-16
img

The only thing that prevents the earth from getting fired is the ozone layer.

Protect the ozone layer to protect yourself.

!Follow Us onAppsinvo | Behance | Facebook | Instagram  | Linkedin | Dribbble | Twitter | Tumblr | Pinterest | Flickr

William Jones 2017-11-02
img

If you were around in the '80s, you might recall the widespread fear over the discovery of a massive hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica.

It's still there, but NASA says 2017 delivered a daintier hole than usual.

The ozone layer acts as a protective shroud over the Earth, blocking out ultraviolet radiation.

NASA likens it to an atmospheric version of sunscreen.

Our planet wouldn't be habitable without the ozone layer to help protect us from the sun.

NASA and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have been monitoring the ozone hole since it was first discovered in 1985.

Jimmy Richmond 2017-08-16
img

In 1989, amidst mounting scientific evidence, dozens of nations joined forces to sign a treaty aimed at halting the expansion of a massive hole in Earth’s ozone layer.

Nearly thirty years later, the Montreal Protocol has done just that.

That’s the surprising conclusion of a study published this week in Geophysical Research Letters, which takes a fresh look at the consequences of the nearly 30-year-old treaty that phased out chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and later, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), after scientists determined that these compounds were destroying ozone in Earth’s stratosphere.

Since CFCs and HCFCs are also potent greenhouse gases, phasing them out has had a major impact on US climate pollution: Between 2008 and 2014, the Montreal Protocol led to greenhouse gas reductions with roughly half the benefit of all other climate regulations enacted by the EPA.

“This is something that’s been talked about for a while, this dual benefit of the Montreal Protocol limiting damage to the ozone layer, also curtailing climate change,” Rachel Cleetus, climate policy manager and lead economist with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned scientists, told Gizmodo.

“It’s because all these ozone depleting substances are also very potent global warming gases.”

Timothy Guardado 2021-05-03
img
Hydrofluorocarbons saved the ozone layer, but they’re killing the climate.
Carl Fox 2018-05-30
img

There may be a natural explanation as to why ozone concentrations in the lower stratosphere has decreased, according to a study of Nasa satellite data.

Ozone is found naturally in the atmosphere and protects us from dangerous radiation.

What is known as the ozone layer is the layer of ozone is at about 10-50 km altitude, which protects us against the harmful UV the radiation.

If the ozone layer is damaged, it can affect our ecosystems negatively, among other things, reducing crop yields and disruptions in the food chain in the sea as a consequence.

Between the years 1998 and 2016 have ozone concentrations in the lower stratosphere from the tropics to the 60:th latitude, declined.

A theory from forskarhåll has been that this is due to the release of klorflorkarboner, among other in the paint.

Carl Dechant 2021-06-05
img
New aviation technologies include a halon-free fire-extinguishing agent that reduces effects on the ozone layer, engine nacelle designed to reduce noise, and cabin sidewalls made of recycled materials
William Ly 2016-07-01
img

The reason we're seeing this reversal seems largely due to the Montreal Protocol, which banned the use of CFCs in 1987.

For those who don't know, CFCs release chlorine atoms when they're hit by ultraviolent light, which eats away at the ozone layer and is the reason the hole over Antartica grows during the continent's summer months and shrinks during the winter.

This is not only great news for the environment, but it's also an encouraging development for the efforts against climate change.

Flex Schedules for Adult Students.

Don't get it wrong: the ozone hole is still there and it's still pretty massive, but the healing we're seeing is in line with what we expected when CFCs were initially banned.

Now, 30 years after recognizing the measures we needed to take to solve the ozone problem, we're talking about the possibility of this gigantic hole in the ozone layer sealing itself back up within our lifetimes.

Charles Houston 2016-07-01
img

The hole over the ozone layer is finally healing according to new research by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

A team in Boston reported the first fingerprints of healing in a paper released to the journal Science.

The September ozone hole has reportedly shrunk by 4 million square kilometers since 2000, when ozone depletion was recorded at its peak.

Findings attribute this positive development to the decline in usage of chlorofluorocarbons CFCs – a chemical compound previously found in dry cleaning processes, old white goods and aerosols.

Undoubtedly the Montreal Protocol has had a huge role to play in this change as it banned the use of CFCs when 46 countries signed it in 1987.

Susan Solomon, the Ellen Swallow Richards Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Science at MIT said: We can now be confident that the things we ve done have put the planet on a path to heal…which is pretty good for us, isn t it?