logo
logo
logo
logo
Troy Jones 2019-04-08
img

Scientists researching the microbial life on volcanic vents uncovered more incredible ocean landscapes from the seafloor off the coast of California.

An international team, led by University of Georgia associate professor Samantha Joye, set out to explore sites in both the northern and southern Gulf of California, analysing how microorganisms live in the hot waters by the the vents.

These images come from the ROV SuBastian, a remotely operated sub that can take samples and image the area around these vents, operated from the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel, Falkor.

“We discovered remarkable towers where every surface was occupied by some type of life.

The vibrant colors found on the ‘living rocks’ was striking, and reflects a diversity in biological composition as well as mineral distributions,” Joye said in a news release.

The scientists are collecting microbes and analysing their DNA from the boat using handheld sequencers, according to the Schmidt Ocean Institute website, then switching to more advanced equipment on shore.

collect
0
David Clary 2019-04-04
img

Thanks to some enterprising underwater explorers, I am now a firm believer that the sea floor contains portals to a Stranger Things-esque Upside Down.

A team of researchers from the Schmidt Ocean Institute have been spending their days exploring the depths of the Gulf of California as part of the "Microbial Mysteries" expedition.

Over the past month, the team has been sampling the area, snapping video from about 1.2 miles (approx.

In that time they've gathered data to detail the microbial communities and metabolism of the deep and gain a better understanding of how microbes live around hydrothermal vents and cold seeps.

In the alien, extreme environment of the deep, it's remarkable to see life thriving and using the nutrient-rich vents and seeps to keep themselves alive.

But it was another geological formation, caused by an underwater volcano, that offered the biggest surprise.

collect
0
Alan Krieg 2019-04-08
img

In the Gulf of California, Mexico, a team of researchers dove deep and found a series of venting mineral towers.

These towers were up to 10 meters across, 23 meters tall, and were “teeming with biodiversity and potentially novel fauna.” And they were colorful – so very colorful.

The most shocking part about this situation is the fact that these same spots were visited a decade ago and none of what we see here was there – it’s all new!

Large amounts of new hydrothermal venting popped up in the past 10 years, providing for an ever-changing underwater landscape in the area.

The team aimed to “identify and quantify habitat-specific microbial populations,” and BOY did they find their fill.

“This is an amazing natural laboratory to document incredible organisms and better understand how they survive in extremely challenging environments,” said Dr. Mandy Joye (University of Georgia).

collect
0
David Shiner 2019-04-09
img

Deep in the Gulf of California, scientists have discovered a fantastical expanse of hydrothermal vents, full of crystallized gases, glimmering pools of piping-hot fluids and rainbow-hued life-forms.

A decade ago, scientists visiting this spot saw nothing unusual; this psychedelic seascape seems to have built up around an increase in hydrothermal venting — spots in the seafloor where mineral-laden and superhot water jets out — in the last 10 years.

"Astonishing is not strong enough of a word," said Mandy Joye, a marine biologist at the University of Georgia, who led the team that discovered the vents.

"We saw a lot of really interesting topography, which made me scratch my head," Joye said.

Nearly 6,000 feet (1,800 m) below the surface, they saw the vents that were carpeted with microbes, marine worms and species they didn't recognize.

Most likely, Joye said, new vents have opened since then, or the rate of hydrothermal fluid flow has increased.

collect
0
Troy Jones 2019-04-08
img

Scientists researching the microbial life on volcanic vents uncovered more incredible ocean landscapes from the seafloor off the coast of California.

An international team, led by University of Georgia associate professor Samantha Joye, set out to explore sites in both the northern and southern Gulf of California, analysing how microorganisms live in the hot waters by the the vents.

These images come from the ROV SuBastian, a remotely operated sub that can take samples and image the area around these vents, operated from the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel, Falkor.

“We discovered remarkable towers where every surface was occupied by some type of life.

The vibrant colors found on the ‘living rocks’ was striking, and reflects a diversity in biological composition as well as mineral distributions,” Joye said in a news release.

The scientists are collecting microbes and analysing their DNA from the boat using handheld sequencers, according to the Schmidt Ocean Institute website, then switching to more advanced equipment on shore.

Alan Krieg 2019-04-08
img

In the Gulf of California, Mexico, a team of researchers dove deep and found a series of venting mineral towers.

These towers were up to 10 meters across, 23 meters tall, and were “teeming with biodiversity and potentially novel fauna.” And they were colorful – so very colorful.

The most shocking part about this situation is the fact that these same spots were visited a decade ago and none of what we see here was there – it’s all new!

Large amounts of new hydrothermal venting popped up in the past 10 years, providing for an ever-changing underwater landscape in the area.

The team aimed to “identify and quantify habitat-specific microbial populations,” and BOY did they find their fill.

“This is an amazing natural laboratory to document incredible organisms and better understand how they survive in extremely challenging environments,” said Dr. Mandy Joye (University of Georgia).

David Clary 2019-04-04
img

Thanks to some enterprising underwater explorers, I am now a firm believer that the sea floor contains portals to a Stranger Things-esque Upside Down.

A team of researchers from the Schmidt Ocean Institute have been spending their days exploring the depths of the Gulf of California as part of the "Microbial Mysteries" expedition.

Over the past month, the team has been sampling the area, snapping video from about 1.2 miles (approx.

In that time they've gathered data to detail the microbial communities and metabolism of the deep and gain a better understanding of how microbes live around hydrothermal vents and cold seeps.

In the alien, extreme environment of the deep, it's remarkable to see life thriving and using the nutrient-rich vents and seeps to keep themselves alive.

But it was another geological formation, caused by an underwater volcano, that offered the biggest surprise.

David Shiner 2019-04-09
img

Deep in the Gulf of California, scientists have discovered a fantastical expanse of hydrothermal vents, full of crystallized gases, glimmering pools of piping-hot fluids and rainbow-hued life-forms.

A decade ago, scientists visiting this spot saw nothing unusual; this psychedelic seascape seems to have built up around an increase in hydrothermal venting — spots in the seafloor where mineral-laden and superhot water jets out — in the last 10 years.

"Astonishing is not strong enough of a word," said Mandy Joye, a marine biologist at the University of Georgia, who led the team that discovered the vents.

"We saw a lot of really interesting topography, which made me scratch my head," Joye said.

Nearly 6,000 feet (1,800 m) below the surface, they saw the vents that were carpeted with microbes, marine worms and species they didn't recognize.

Most likely, Joye said, new vents have opened since then, or the rate of hydrothermal fluid flow has increased.