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Daniel Martin 2018-06-17
img

In 1989, a British illustrator and writer team published a children’s picture book called We’re Going on a Bear Hunt.

The book was a hit—later made into a stage play, subjected to a TV adaptation, and involved in a 2014 Guinness World Record for “Largest Reading Lesson”—but you should know it best as the thing that echoes through my head whenever I think of hard stuff.

The book’s bear-hunting protagonist-children face many an obstacle.

Every time, they repeat the refrain: Can’t go over it / Can’t go under it / Have to go through it.

They rolled out new concept cars and announced major partnerships.

Jack spoke with a few at the automotive-safety-focused nonprofit Thatcham Research, who argue that driver-assistance features like Tesla’s Autopilot, Nissan’s ProPilot Assist, and Mercedes’ Drive Pilot need a clearer grading system, stat.

collect
0
Wayne Strickland 2017-03-13
img

On Thursday, newly appointed EPA chief Scott Pruitt said he doesn't think human-driven carbon dioxide emissions cause global warming.

We already knew that Scott Pruitt was a climate change denialist.

During his campaign, Trump claimed that climate change was a "hoax" perpetrated by the Chinese.

I believe some of it is naturally occurring, but some of it is also caused by man-made activity."

Oil companies, coal companies, and others who make their money from fossil fuels–notably the Koch brothers and their fake-science-pushing Heartland Institute–have devoted millions of dollars and years of effort to climate change denialism.

Sen. Schatz is correct, of course–but there wasn't any doubt in the first place.

collect
0
Raymond Maxwell 2017-03-10
img

Scott Pruitt, President Donald Trump’s choice to run the Environmental Protection Agency, was explaining to CNBC’s Joe Kernen that the Paris climate accord was “a bad deal,” with provisions that were “not an America First type of approach,” when Kernen asked him if they could cut to the “nitty-gritty.” Did Pruitt believe that “it’s been proven that CO2 is the primary control knob for climate?”

“No, I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do, and there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact.” And then, lest anyone think that he was merely rejecting Kernen’s Spaceship Earth image of a planetary control board with big knobs on it—rather than the observation, validated by decades of data, of the profound effect of the accumulation of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere—Pruitt added, “So, no, I would not agree that it’s a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.”

As Pruitt went on about the need to “continue the debate,” Kernen could hardly contain his delight.

“When I hear ‘the science is settled,’ it’s like, I never heard that science actually got to a point where it was—that’s the whole point of science, is that you keep asking questions.” (In an interview with the Times after the election, Trump placed Kernen alongside the “smart people” who had different views on climate change from those of the likes of Tom Friedman.)

Then, having established that it’s anti-scientific to believe that scientists could come up with an idea that is any sort of a basis for action—a position that raises doubts about decisions to send humans to the moon or to tell them to stop smoking—Kernen moved on to another point where the rejection of the science of climate change meets a dozen other threads of Trumpism: the cultivation of resentment.

It’s a terrible thing to be called, and anyway, Administrator Pruitt, I know you don’t want to be called it either.”

collect
0
Thomas Nye 2017-04-12
img

Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt, who wants to ensure the US doesn’t invest a single dollar in protecting humanity from climate change, nonetheless wants to use the agency’s limited funds to protect himself from other humans.

Last month, President Trump released a draft federal spending budget requesting $2.3 billion in cuts to the EPA.

Under Trump’s budget, climate change research would be obliterated, funding for the clean up of hazardous sites would be slashed by 45 percent, environmental justice programs would be phased out, and a projected 3,200 jobs would be eliminated.

But as the New York Times reports, there is one EPA activity that could see an uptick in funding: personal protection for its fearless leader.

One enforcement activity that could be set for an increase: security for Scott Pruitt, the new E.P.A.

The agency has asked for 10 additional full-time staff members for a round-the-clock security detail — a first for an E.P.A.

collect
0
Timothy Guardado 2017-04-22
img

DALLAS — Scott Pruitt has emerged as an unusually controversial

Environmental Protection Agency administrator, a Cabinet-level

position that historically hasn't held the name recognition that

As Oklahoma's attorney general, Pruitt sued the agency he now

leads 14 times, accusing President Barack Obama's EPA of over

Nearly 800 former EPA officials urged the Senate to block

collect
0
Keith Brewton 2016-12-08
img

Donald Trump has reportedly nominated Scott Pruitt, the Attorney

General of Oklahoma, to be the new head of the Environmental

The choice won't please environmentalists; Pruitt has "made

no secret of his disdain for the EPA," according to NPR.The EPA is responsible for enforcing an increase in

Corporate Average Fuel Economy CAFE standards, something that

automakers have been protesting, even though they've been doing a

collect
0
Laura Kelly 2018-04-26
img

EPA administrator Scott Pruitt heads to Capitol Hill Thursday for two separate hearings, ostensibly to answer questions about his agency’s budget.

But House lawmakers—both Republican and Democrat—will instead focus on a series of scandals that have turned the agency upside down.

From his paranoia about personal security and that $43,000 soundproof telephone booth to sweetheart lodging deals with lobbyists and big pay raises for young aides, Pruitt will be answering some skeptical House members.

And while the administrator defends himself against allegations of misconduct and ethics missteps, environmental advocates and some EPA employees are focused on what federal environmental and climate policies could look like in a possible post-Pruitt era.

Employees there get most of their information about Pruitt’s agenda from TV news.

The rule would restrict the EPA from using scientific studies whose data are not made publicly available online “in a manner that is sufficient for independent analysis and substantial reproduction of research results."

collect
0
William Franklin 2017-01-18
img

In the early nineteen-sixties, a young lawyer named William Ruckelshaus was assigned to Indiana s state board of health to prosecute cases of toxic dumping.

At the time, it was commonplace for manufacturers to discard untreated industrial swill—ammonia, cyanide, pesticides, petroleum waste, slag from steel plants, pickle liquor sulfuric acid —into the nearest sewer, river, or lake.

Those rivers were cesspools, Ruckelshaus told me recently.

He and his colleague Gerald Hansler, an environmental engineer, began touring the state in a white panel truck.

Yet, however diligently they worked, their efforts were often regarded with suspicion by Indiana s governor, who wanted to keep businesses from moving to states with even laxer environmental standards.

Ruckelshaus brought this lesson with him to Washington, D.C., in 1970, when President Richard Nixon appointed him to set up and run the newly created U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

collect
0
Scott Siebenaler 2016-12-22
img

The future of the Clean Power Plan is unclear.

It is currently pending a federal court challenge brought by Republican-led states.

Even if it survives that decision unscathed, President-elect Donald Trump has promised to undo it—and his choice to lead the EPA, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, has been among those leading the lawsuit.

Still, the incoming administration getting rid of the Clean Power Plan, and getting around the Supreme Court ruling directing the EPA to consider CO a pollutant under the Clean Air Act.

collect
0
Melvin Bailey 2017-02-17
img

Pruitt to head the .

He s previously expressed doubt regarding the science behind climate change and has sued the EPA 14 times in his tenure as AG of Oklahoma a state which has, incidentally, suffered .

He also drew fire after discovered that Pruitt had copied wholesale a letter drafted by oil and gas company Devon Energy and sent it to regulators in Washington as his own, with only a few minor changes.

The wrote that Pruitt had done this several times in letters he sent to the EPA, the Office of Management and Budget, and President Obama.

collect
0
Charles Pete 2021-04-21
img
EPA tossed its pollution models, allowing another agency to make its own instead.
collect
0
Ronald Black 2017-04-15
img

Environmental groups have been beside themselves since election night, and rightly so.

Overnight, they went from sitting at the head of the EPA's policymaking table, to being locked out of the house while the new EPA Administrator, Scott Pruitt, hurriedly dismantles everything they’ve tried to accomplish since 2008.

But don't expect them to go gentle into that good night.

They still have some tools at their disposal.

Tool Number 1: The Lower Courts

No matter who's in office, every major EPA rule ends up in court.

collect
0
Corey Matthew 2016-12-08

MoreOklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt arrives at Trump Tower in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016.

Environmental groups quickly denounced Pruitt as a puppet of polluters, with the Sierra Club likening his selection as EPA administrator to "putting an arsonist in charge of fighting fires."

Though Trump had not yet officially named Pruitt as his nominee, senior adviser Kellyanne Conway appeared to confirm Pruitt had gotten the nod as she exited Trump Tower Wednesday evening.

... We look forward to the confirmation hearings."

Representatives of the nation's mining and oil interests also cheered Trump's choice.

"His appointment will put rational and reasonable regulation at the forefront."

collect
0
Steven Condon 2018-04-13
img

Two Democratic senators have written a formal letter to the Environmental Protection Agency’s internal watchdog, asking a basic question: how many email accounts does Administrator Scott Pruitt have?

“Our offices have received information indicating that the Administrator uses three different secret epa.gov email addresses in addition to his official email address: [email protected],” the senators wrote in a letter sent to the EPA’s Office of the Inspector General and first published by The Washington Post.

“It is imperative that there be an investigation into whether the agency has properly searched these email addresses for responsive documents in response to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests.”

The two senators, Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) and Tom Carper (D-Del.

), say that Pruitt has “at least four” such accounts.

The concern is that, when FOIA requests come into the office, the EPA may not be fully searching all the active email accounts.

collect
0
Calvin Muchow 2018-08-16
img

The EPA is about to enact rules that would essentially hobble the agency’s own ability to protect the environment.

Rules were first proposed on April 30th, 2018, under now-resigned and disgraced Trump-appointed EPA head Scott Pruitt.

The wording of the proposition suggests that it will “strengthen the transparency of EPA regulatory science.” Sounds pretty on-the-level so far, yes?

This proposition suggests that new rules would help make transparent the EPA’s regulation development process.

The document then skews into broad wording meant to confuse the intent of the writer and the understanding of the reader.

The document says “including regulations for which the public is likely to bear the cost of compliance.”

collect
0
Marcel Carroll 2017-03-31

We all hoped EPA head, Scott Pruitt, would eventually face consequences when he falsely claimed that there was “tremendous disagreement” about whether human activity cause global warming.

The time may have finally arrived.

Reuters reports that EPA’s internal watchdog, the Scientific Integrity Office, is reviewing Pruitt’s patently false statements.

In early March, Pruitt said that the global community “need[s] to continue the debate” on global warming on CNBC:

“I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do and there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact, so no, I would not agree that it’s a primary contributor to the global warming that we see,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.””But we don’t know that yet.

... We need to continue the debate and continue the review and the analysis.”

collect
0
Daniel Martin 2018-06-17
img

In 1989, a British illustrator and writer team published a children’s picture book called We’re Going on a Bear Hunt.

The book was a hit—later made into a stage play, subjected to a TV adaptation, and involved in a 2014 Guinness World Record for “Largest Reading Lesson”—but you should know it best as the thing that echoes through my head whenever I think of hard stuff.

The book’s bear-hunting protagonist-children face many an obstacle.

Every time, they repeat the refrain: Can’t go over it / Can’t go under it / Have to go through it.

They rolled out new concept cars and announced major partnerships.

Jack spoke with a few at the automotive-safety-focused nonprofit Thatcham Research, who argue that driver-assistance features like Tesla’s Autopilot, Nissan’s ProPilot Assist, and Mercedes’ Drive Pilot need a clearer grading system, stat.

Raymond Maxwell 2017-03-10
img

Scott Pruitt, President Donald Trump’s choice to run the Environmental Protection Agency, was explaining to CNBC’s Joe Kernen that the Paris climate accord was “a bad deal,” with provisions that were “not an America First type of approach,” when Kernen asked him if they could cut to the “nitty-gritty.” Did Pruitt believe that “it’s been proven that CO2 is the primary control knob for climate?”

“No, I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do, and there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact.” And then, lest anyone think that he was merely rejecting Kernen’s Spaceship Earth image of a planetary control board with big knobs on it—rather than the observation, validated by decades of data, of the profound effect of the accumulation of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere—Pruitt added, “So, no, I would not agree that it’s a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.”

As Pruitt went on about the need to “continue the debate,” Kernen could hardly contain his delight.

“When I hear ‘the science is settled,’ it’s like, I never heard that science actually got to a point where it was—that’s the whole point of science, is that you keep asking questions.” (In an interview with the Times after the election, Trump placed Kernen alongside the “smart people” who had different views on climate change from those of the likes of Tom Friedman.)

Then, having established that it’s anti-scientific to believe that scientists could come up with an idea that is any sort of a basis for action—a position that raises doubts about decisions to send humans to the moon or to tell them to stop smoking—Kernen moved on to another point where the rejection of the science of climate change meets a dozen other threads of Trumpism: the cultivation of resentment.

It’s a terrible thing to be called, and anyway, Administrator Pruitt, I know you don’t want to be called it either.”

Timothy Guardado 2017-04-22
img

DALLAS — Scott Pruitt has emerged as an unusually controversial

Environmental Protection Agency administrator, a Cabinet-level

position that historically hasn't held the name recognition that

As Oklahoma's attorney general, Pruitt sued the agency he now

leads 14 times, accusing President Barack Obama's EPA of over

Nearly 800 former EPA officials urged the Senate to block

Laura Kelly 2018-04-26
img

EPA administrator Scott Pruitt heads to Capitol Hill Thursday for two separate hearings, ostensibly to answer questions about his agency’s budget.

But House lawmakers—both Republican and Democrat—will instead focus on a series of scandals that have turned the agency upside down.

From his paranoia about personal security and that $43,000 soundproof telephone booth to sweetheart lodging deals with lobbyists and big pay raises for young aides, Pruitt will be answering some skeptical House members.

And while the administrator defends himself against allegations of misconduct and ethics missteps, environmental advocates and some EPA employees are focused on what federal environmental and climate policies could look like in a possible post-Pruitt era.

Employees there get most of their information about Pruitt’s agenda from TV news.

The rule would restrict the EPA from using scientific studies whose data are not made publicly available online “in a manner that is sufficient for independent analysis and substantial reproduction of research results."

Scott Siebenaler 2016-12-22
img

The future of the Clean Power Plan is unclear.

It is currently pending a federal court challenge brought by Republican-led states.

Even if it survives that decision unscathed, President-elect Donald Trump has promised to undo it—and his choice to lead the EPA, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, has been among those leading the lawsuit.

Still, the incoming administration getting rid of the Clean Power Plan, and getting around the Supreme Court ruling directing the EPA to consider CO a pollutant under the Clean Air Act.

Charles Pete 2021-04-21
img
EPA tossed its pollution models, allowing another agency to make its own instead.
Corey Matthew 2016-12-08

MoreOklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt arrives at Trump Tower in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016.

Environmental groups quickly denounced Pruitt as a puppet of polluters, with the Sierra Club likening his selection as EPA administrator to "putting an arsonist in charge of fighting fires."

Though Trump had not yet officially named Pruitt as his nominee, senior adviser Kellyanne Conway appeared to confirm Pruitt had gotten the nod as she exited Trump Tower Wednesday evening.

... We look forward to the confirmation hearings."

Representatives of the nation's mining and oil interests also cheered Trump's choice.

"His appointment will put rational and reasonable regulation at the forefront."

Calvin Muchow 2018-08-16
img

The EPA is about to enact rules that would essentially hobble the agency’s own ability to protect the environment.

Rules were first proposed on April 30th, 2018, under now-resigned and disgraced Trump-appointed EPA head Scott Pruitt.

The wording of the proposition suggests that it will “strengthen the transparency of EPA regulatory science.” Sounds pretty on-the-level so far, yes?

This proposition suggests that new rules would help make transparent the EPA’s regulation development process.

The document then skews into broad wording meant to confuse the intent of the writer and the understanding of the reader.

The document says “including regulations for which the public is likely to bear the cost of compliance.”

Wayne Strickland 2017-03-13
img

On Thursday, newly appointed EPA chief Scott Pruitt said he doesn't think human-driven carbon dioxide emissions cause global warming.

We already knew that Scott Pruitt was a climate change denialist.

During his campaign, Trump claimed that climate change was a "hoax" perpetrated by the Chinese.

I believe some of it is naturally occurring, but some of it is also caused by man-made activity."

Oil companies, coal companies, and others who make their money from fossil fuels–notably the Koch brothers and their fake-science-pushing Heartland Institute–have devoted millions of dollars and years of effort to climate change denialism.

Sen. Schatz is correct, of course–but there wasn't any doubt in the first place.

Thomas Nye 2017-04-12
img

Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt, who wants to ensure the US doesn’t invest a single dollar in protecting humanity from climate change, nonetheless wants to use the agency’s limited funds to protect himself from other humans.

Last month, President Trump released a draft federal spending budget requesting $2.3 billion in cuts to the EPA.

Under Trump’s budget, climate change research would be obliterated, funding for the clean up of hazardous sites would be slashed by 45 percent, environmental justice programs would be phased out, and a projected 3,200 jobs would be eliminated.

But as the New York Times reports, there is one EPA activity that could see an uptick in funding: personal protection for its fearless leader.

One enforcement activity that could be set for an increase: security for Scott Pruitt, the new E.P.A.

The agency has asked for 10 additional full-time staff members for a round-the-clock security detail — a first for an E.P.A.

Keith Brewton 2016-12-08
img

Donald Trump has reportedly nominated Scott Pruitt, the Attorney

General of Oklahoma, to be the new head of the Environmental

The choice won't please environmentalists; Pruitt has "made

no secret of his disdain for the EPA," according to NPR.The EPA is responsible for enforcing an increase in

Corporate Average Fuel Economy CAFE standards, something that

automakers have been protesting, even though they've been doing a

William Franklin 2017-01-18
img

In the early nineteen-sixties, a young lawyer named William Ruckelshaus was assigned to Indiana s state board of health to prosecute cases of toxic dumping.

At the time, it was commonplace for manufacturers to discard untreated industrial swill—ammonia, cyanide, pesticides, petroleum waste, slag from steel plants, pickle liquor sulfuric acid —into the nearest sewer, river, or lake.

Those rivers were cesspools, Ruckelshaus told me recently.

He and his colleague Gerald Hansler, an environmental engineer, began touring the state in a white panel truck.

Yet, however diligently they worked, their efforts were often regarded with suspicion by Indiana s governor, who wanted to keep businesses from moving to states with even laxer environmental standards.

Ruckelshaus brought this lesson with him to Washington, D.C., in 1970, when President Richard Nixon appointed him to set up and run the newly created U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Melvin Bailey 2017-02-17
img

Pruitt to head the .

He s previously expressed doubt regarding the science behind climate change and has sued the EPA 14 times in his tenure as AG of Oklahoma a state which has, incidentally, suffered .

He also drew fire after discovered that Pruitt had copied wholesale a letter drafted by oil and gas company Devon Energy and sent it to regulators in Washington as his own, with only a few minor changes.

The wrote that Pruitt had done this several times in letters he sent to the EPA, the Office of Management and Budget, and President Obama.

Ronald Black 2017-04-15
img

Environmental groups have been beside themselves since election night, and rightly so.

Overnight, they went from sitting at the head of the EPA's policymaking table, to being locked out of the house while the new EPA Administrator, Scott Pruitt, hurriedly dismantles everything they’ve tried to accomplish since 2008.

But don't expect them to go gentle into that good night.

They still have some tools at their disposal.

Tool Number 1: The Lower Courts

No matter who's in office, every major EPA rule ends up in court.

Steven Condon 2018-04-13
img

Two Democratic senators have written a formal letter to the Environmental Protection Agency’s internal watchdog, asking a basic question: how many email accounts does Administrator Scott Pruitt have?

“Our offices have received information indicating that the Administrator uses three different secret epa.gov email addresses in addition to his official email address: [email protected],” the senators wrote in a letter sent to the EPA’s Office of the Inspector General and first published by The Washington Post.

“It is imperative that there be an investigation into whether the agency has properly searched these email addresses for responsive documents in response to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests.”

The two senators, Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) and Tom Carper (D-Del.

), say that Pruitt has “at least four” such accounts.

The concern is that, when FOIA requests come into the office, the EPA may not be fully searching all the active email accounts.

Marcel Carroll 2017-03-31

We all hoped EPA head, Scott Pruitt, would eventually face consequences when he falsely claimed that there was “tremendous disagreement” about whether human activity cause global warming.

The time may have finally arrived.

Reuters reports that EPA’s internal watchdog, the Scientific Integrity Office, is reviewing Pruitt’s patently false statements.

In early March, Pruitt said that the global community “need[s] to continue the debate” on global warming on CNBC:

“I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do and there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact, so no, I would not agree that it’s a primary contributor to the global warming that we see,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.””But we don’t know that yet.

... We need to continue the debate and continue the review and the analysis.”