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Sean Biro 2016-05-27
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San Jose s own Rutvik Gandhasri was one of the final six competitors in the Scripps National Spelling Bee Thursday night before the word betony took him down.

For the third-straight year, the Bee ended in a tie….Coming soon to a store near you: dynamic pricing for Snickers bars based on people s moods….A Chinese commercial for detergent might just be the most-racist ad ever….And the phrase Wish You Were Here takes on a new meaning as the U.K. s Royal Mail issues stamps to mark Pink Floyd s 50th anniversary.Photo: Spellers Nihar Saireddy Janga of Austin, Texas and Jairam Jagadeesh Hathwar of Painted Post, New York hold a trophy after the finals of the 2016 Scripps National Spelling Bee Thursday night.

Both spellers were declared co-champions at the end of the annual spelling competition.

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images Tags: Chinese detergent ad, Pink Floyd, Royal Mail, Scripps, Snickers, spelling bee

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0
Laura Kelly 2016-05-27
img

It was a night full of tears and taunts, of cold-blooded celebrations and clutch competition.

In what seems to have been a concerted effort to appeal to the elusive youth culture, the ESPN-broadcasted bee was replete with moments intended to go viral — and however obviously cynical the move may have been, we have to admit: It worked.

While the Golden State Warriors were dueling with the Oklahoma City Thunder on the West Coast, we had a matchup just as contentious on the other side of the country, between the soon-to-be co-champions Nihar Janga and Jairam Hathwar.

The bee used our collective adulation of Golden State superstar Steph Curry to help Nihar parse giallolino.

While painting a portrait for his shrine to Steph Curry, the artist used giallolino to help create the perfect hue for his Golden State Warriors jersey.

Nihar went on to celebrate a successful spelling of gesellschaft with Dez Bryant s patented X move …

Lil Wayne and JJ Watt also found themselves fixed to the screen as the competition went down.

collect
0
Roy Shannon 2016-05-28
img

The Scripps National Spelling Bee may have just crowned the two best spellers in the country that s right, for the third year in the row, the spectacular event ended in a tie , but that doesn t mean that the rest of America is quite as adept at sounding out words.

In fact, Google has now released data on just how challenging we find the English language to be — at least, when it comes to its written form.

The team behind Google Trends took it upon themselves to uncover the top how to spell searches for words by state, and some of the results are pretty amusing.

People from Idaho, Illinois, and Connecticut, whose surroundings are ostensibly a bit less arid, have trouble with desert as well.

In Michigan, South Dakota, and Oklahoma, on the other hand, residents aren t quite so sure about how to spell the color in between black and white — gray.

Are we still part of England?

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0
Bradley Liss 2019-05-31
img

This year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee ended in an unprecedented way, crowning eight joint winners for the first time in its 94-year-long history.

Each champion spelled out 47 correct words in a row, and all eight finalists were awarded a trophy and the $50,000 cash prize after judges ran out of difficult words with which to challenge them.

HuffPost is part of Oath.

Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.

Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.

Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.

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0
Thomas Crain 2016-05-27
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In celebration of the 89th Annual Scripps National Spelling Bee, Google thought it would be fun to point out how much of the United States wouldn't last in even a preliminary round of the spelling contest.

Creating a map from Google Trends data, each state was marked with the word it most commonly searches for after the phrase, "how do I spell."

The results were head-slappingly simple, with gimmes like "vacuum" and "February" being the bane of certain states.

Some words were common among multiple states, such as "desert" - the arid location seemingly confused with the post-dinner treat across Idaho, California, Indiana, and Connecticut.

However, seeing Ohio struggle with "banana," or Massachusetts needing to look up its own name, are a little more on the embarrassing side.

Meanwhile, we're certain each term on Google's map is a breeze for the competitors at this year's National Spelling Bee, who apparently have the cool to throw in some dabs after successfully spelling tough entries like "bacteriolytic" and "mischsprache."

collect
0
Lucas Castillo 2019-05-30
img

We’re near the end of the 2019 official Scripps National Spelling Bee, and it’s time to tune in.

This world-renowned bee started with 550 spellers from across the United States, and we’re down to 12.

Today we’re going to list all the most important information you’ll need to know to immerse yourself in the bee, from video streaming sources to the most challenging words yet spelled.

The first part of the bee took place at 10 a.m. EDT on ESPN 2 on Thursday, the 30th of May, 2019.

The finals will start tonight, May 30th, 2019, on ESPN proper at 8:30 p.m. EDT.

You could potentially catch the streaming live version of the bee via ESPN’s website and WatchESPN, though there you’ll still need login info from your network television provider.

collect
0
Jeremy Green 2016-05-26
img

Thursday night, ten kids will face off on stage to prove their linguistic prowess at the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

To celebrate and highlight just how comparatively bad at words the rest of us are , Google's data and visualization team put together a map showing the top spellings that people needed to search for in every state.

Some classics show up, like "neighbor" and "guarantee," but some more surprising words appear too, like "boutineer" or "banana" in Ohio guess people there never listened to Gwen Stefani .

And poor Massachusetts residents don't know how to spell their own state name.For comparison, kids competing in the National Spelling Bee get words like "cacomixl," "dipnoous," and "salele.

"Here's the full map:NOW WATCH: This 14-year-old makes up to $1,500 a night eating dinner in front of a webcam in South KoreaLoading video...

collect
0
Ralph Miller 2019-05-31
img

Those are just three of the words conquered by eight new national spelling bee champions in an unprecedented finish for the annual competition.

Scripps National Spelling Bee started Thursday morning with 50 contestants, but it wasn't until right after midnight when eight young spellers split the championship, a first in the 92 years of the event.

The young scholastic competitors survived 20 rounds of the toughest words to spell and pronounce, and each will take home the $50,000 cash prize and the title of co-champion.

"Champion spellers, we are in uncharted territory," spelling bee pronouncer Jacque Bailly said Thursday.

"We have plenty of words remaining on our list, but will soon run out of words that can possibly challenge you -- the most phenomenal assemblage of spellers in the history of this storied competition.

We have thrown the dictionary at you, and so far, you've shown the dictionary who's boss."

collect
0
Melvin Bailey 2016-05-26
img

Top Of The Order:  Google: 1, Oracle: 0: The legal brawl between Oracle and Google over Google s use of Java in Android smartphones came to an end, for now at least, on Thursday, with a federal jury ruling in Google s favor.Late Thursday, the jury determined that Google was within its legal rights to use Java in Android without having to pay fees to Oracle, which was seeking $9 billion in damages.

Oracle alleged that its was entitled to that amount because Google was using copyrighted material Oracle acquired when it bought Sun Microsystems for more than $7 billion in 2010.

Oracle is expected to appeal the decision.Middle Innings: The Battle Heats Up: The fight between Gawker Media and Silicon Valley billionaire investor Peter Thiel–A battle that wasn t even a battle when the week began–heated up on Thursday to a point where it made the mudslinging in this year s presidential race seem like little more than two second-graders arguing over who cut in front of whom in the school lunch line.The New York Post reported that Gawker founder and majority owner Nick Denton hired Marc Patricof, a media banker with Houlihan Lokey, to assist Gawker with exploring options for its business, including a possible sale.

Gawker may still appeal the ruling to a higher court.In a statement sent to the Mercury News, Gawker confirmed it has hired bankers to look at what it should do next, but tried to play down the situation.

The gloves are off and the bankers and lawyers are only going to have more of a field day as the Gawker-Thiel drama goes on.And Today Was HP s Turn: On Wednesday, Hewlett Packard Enterprise got a boost from investors after the company reported decent quarterly results and said it would spin off and merge its business-services division with Computer Sciences in a deal worth $8.5 billion.So, it was probably only fair that HP, the company responsible for PC sales that came out of Hewlett-Packard s split late last year, would have its own day in the sun on Thursday.

Well, Rutvik Gandhasri, 12-year-old seventh-grader at San Jose s Chaboya Middle School could Thursday morning to advance to the final round of 10 in the Scripps National Spelling Bee championship.Sign up for the 60-Second Business Break newsletter at www.siliconvalley.com.Photo: Building 40 at the Googleplex in Mountain View.

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0
Michael Smith 2020-09-12
img

The Trump campaign was quick to praise President Donald Trump’s nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize this week.

But in its haste, it misspelled the word “Nobel” as “Noble” in the series of ads that it paid hundreds of dollars for and posted on Facebook and Instagram.

At least six ads containing the typo on a graphic were posted to Trump’s official pages on Thursday and Friday, according to Facebook’s ad library.

The captions of the ads also falsely proclaimed Trump had “achieved PEACE in the MIDDLE EAST!”

All of the ads are now listed as “inactive.”

Trump himself in April misspelled the word in a Twitter rant about the media. He deleted the post and later claimed he was being sarcastic

Far-right Norwegian lawmaker Christian Tybring-Gjedde, known for his Islamophobic and anti-immigration views, nominated Trump for the 2021 prize for his work on diplomatic ties between the United Arab Emirates and Israel.

Tybring-Gjedde also put Trump forward for the 2019 prize for his talks with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

Inevitably, the ads went viral for the wrong reasons:

Also on HuffPost
collect
0
Sean Biro 2016-05-27
img

San Jose s own Rutvik Gandhasri was one of the final six competitors in the Scripps National Spelling Bee Thursday night before the word betony took him down.

For the third-straight year, the Bee ended in a tie….Coming soon to a store near you: dynamic pricing for Snickers bars based on people s moods….A Chinese commercial for detergent might just be the most-racist ad ever….And the phrase Wish You Were Here takes on a new meaning as the U.K. s Royal Mail issues stamps to mark Pink Floyd s 50th anniversary.Photo: Spellers Nihar Saireddy Janga of Austin, Texas and Jairam Jagadeesh Hathwar of Painted Post, New York hold a trophy after the finals of the 2016 Scripps National Spelling Bee Thursday night.

Both spellers were declared co-champions at the end of the annual spelling competition.

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images Tags: Chinese detergent ad, Pink Floyd, Royal Mail, Scripps, Snickers, spelling bee

Roy Shannon 2016-05-28
img

The Scripps National Spelling Bee may have just crowned the two best spellers in the country that s right, for the third year in the row, the spectacular event ended in a tie , but that doesn t mean that the rest of America is quite as adept at sounding out words.

In fact, Google has now released data on just how challenging we find the English language to be — at least, when it comes to its written form.

The team behind Google Trends took it upon themselves to uncover the top how to spell searches for words by state, and some of the results are pretty amusing.

People from Idaho, Illinois, and Connecticut, whose surroundings are ostensibly a bit less arid, have trouble with desert as well.

In Michigan, South Dakota, and Oklahoma, on the other hand, residents aren t quite so sure about how to spell the color in between black and white — gray.

Are we still part of England?

Thomas Crain 2016-05-27
img

In celebration of the 89th Annual Scripps National Spelling Bee, Google thought it would be fun to point out how much of the United States wouldn't last in even a preliminary round of the spelling contest.

Creating a map from Google Trends data, each state was marked with the word it most commonly searches for after the phrase, "how do I spell."

The results were head-slappingly simple, with gimmes like "vacuum" and "February" being the bane of certain states.

Some words were common among multiple states, such as "desert" - the arid location seemingly confused with the post-dinner treat across Idaho, California, Indiana, and Connecticut.

However, seeing Ohio struggle with "banana," or Massachusetts needing to look up its own name, are a little more on the embarrassing side.

Meanwhile, we're certain each term on Google's map is a breeze for the competitors at this year's National Spelling Bee, who apparently have the cool to throw in some dabs after successfully spelling tough entries like "bacteriolytic" and "mischsprache."

Jeremy Green 2016-05-26
img

Thursday night, ten kids will face off on stage to prove their linguistic prowess at the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

To celebrate and highlight just how comparatively bad at words the rest of us are , Google's data and visualization team put together a map showing the top spellings that people needed to search for in every state.

Some classics show up, like "neighbor" and "guarantee," but some more surprising words appear too, like "boutineer" or "banana" in Ohio guess people there never listened to Gwen Stefani .

And poor Massachusetts residents don't know how to spell their own state name.For comparison, kids competing in the National Spelling Bee get words like "cacomixl," "dipnoous," and "salele.

"Here's the full map:NOW WATCH: This 14-year-old makes up to $1,500 a night eating dinner in front of a webcam in South KoreaLoading video...

Melvin Bailey 2016-05-26
img

Top Of The Order:  Google: 1, Oracle: 0: The legal brawl between Oracle and Google over Google s use of Java in Android smartphones came to an end, for now at least, on Thursday, with a federal jury ruling in Google s favor.Late Thursday, the jury determined that Google was within its legal rights to use Java in Android without having to pay fees to Oracle, which was seeking $9 billion in damages.

Oracle alleged that its was entitled to that amount because Google was using copyrighted material Oracle acquired when it bought Sun Microsystems for more than $7 billion in 2010.

Oracle is expected to appeal the decision.Middle Innings: The Battle Heats Up: The fight between Gawker Media and Silicon Valley billionaire investor Peter Thiel–A battle that wasn t even a battle when the week began–heated up on Thursday to a point where it made the mudslinging in this year s presidential race seem like little more than two second-graders arguing over who cut in front of whom in the school lunch line.The New York Post reported that Gawker founder and majority owner Nick Denton hired Marc Patricof, a media banker with Houlihan Lokey, to assist Gawker with exploring options for its business, including a possible sale.

Gawker may still appeal the ruling to a higher court.In a statement sent to the Mercury News, Gawker confirmed it has hired bankers to look at what it should do next, but tried to play down the situation.

The gloves are off and the bankers and lawyers are only going to have more of a field day as the Gawker-Thiel drama goes on.And Today Was HP s Turn: On Wednesday, Hewlett Packard Enterprise got a boost from investors after the company reported decent quarterly results and said it would spin off and merge its business-services division with Computer Sciences in a deal worth $8.5 billion.So, it was probably only fair that HP, the company responsible for PC sales that came out of Hewlett-Packard s split late last year, would have its own day in the sun on Thursday.

Well, Rutvik Gandhasri, 12-year-old seventh-grader at San Jose s Chaboya Middle School could Thursday morning to advance to the final round of 10 in the Scripps National Spelling Bee championship.Sign up for the 60-Second Business Break newsletter at www.siliconvalley.com.Photo: Building 40 at the Googleplex in Mountain View.

Laura Kelly 2016-05-27
img

It was a night full of tears and taunts, of cold-blooded celebrations and clutch competition.

In what seems to have been a concerted effort to appeal to the elusive youth culture, the ESPN-broadcasted bee was replete with moments intended to go viral — and however obviously cynical the move may have been, we have to admit: It worked.

While the Golden State Warriors were dueling with the Oklahoma City Thunder on the West Coast, we had a matchup just as contentious on the other side of the country, between the soon-to-be co-champions Nihar Janga and Jairam Hathwar.

The bee used our collective adulation of Golden State superstar Steph Curry to help Nihar parse giallolino.

While painting a portrait for his shrine to Steph Curry, the artist used giallolino to help create the perfect hue for his Golden State Warriors jersey.

Nihar went on to celebrate a successful spelling of gesellschaft with Dez Bryant s patented X move …

Lil Wayne and JJ Watt also found themselves fixed to the screen as the competition went down.

Bradley Liss 2019-05-31
img

This year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee ended in an unprecedented way, crowning eight joint winners for the first time in its 94-year-long history.

Each champion spelled out 47 correct words in a row, and all eight finalists were awarded a trophy and the $50,000 cash prize after judges ran out of difficult words with which to challenge them.

HuffPost is part of Oath.

Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.

Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.

Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.

Lucas Castillo 2019-05-30
img

We’re near the end of the 2019 official Scripps National Spelling Bee, and it’s time to tune in.

This world-renowned bee started with 550 spellers from across the United States, and we’re down to 12.

Today we’re going to list all the most important information you’ll need to know to immerse yourself in the bee, from video streaming sources to the most challenging words yet spelled.

The first part of the bee took place at 10 a.m. EDT on ESPN 2 on Thursday, the 30th of May, 2019.

The finals will start tonight, May 30th, 2019, on ESPN proper at 8:30 p.m. EDT.

You could potentially catch the streaming live version of the bee via ESPN’s website and WatchESPN, though there you’ll still need login info from your network television provider.

Ralph Miller 2019-05-31
img

Those are just three of the words conquered by eight new national spelling bee champions in an unprecedented finish for the annual competition.

Scripps National Spelling Bee started Thursday morning with 50 contestants, but it wasn't until right after midnight when eight young spellers split the championship, a first in the 92 years of the event.

The young scholastic competitors survived 20 rounds of the toughest words to spell and pronounce, and each will take home the $50,000 cash prize and the title of co-champion.

"Champion spellers, we are in uncharted territory," spelling bee pronouncer Jacque Bailly said Thursday.

"We have plenty of words remaining on our list, but will soon run out of words that can possibly challenge you -- the most phenomenal assemblage of spellers in the history of this storied competition.

We have thrown the dictionary at you, and so far, you've shown the dictionary who's boss."

Michael Smith 2020-09-12
img

The Trump campaign was quick to praise President Donald Trump’s nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize this week.

But in its haste, it misspelled the word “Nobel” as “Noble” in the series of ads that it paid hundreds of dollars for and posted on Facebook and Instagram.

At least six ads containing the typo on a graphic were posted to Trump’s official pages on Thursday and Friday, according to Facebook’s ad library.

The captions of the ads also falsely proclaimed Trump had “achieved PEACE in the MIDDLE EAST!”

All of the ads are now listed as “inactive.”

Trump himself in April misspelled the word in a Twitter rant about the media. He deleted the post and later claimed he was being sarcastic

Far-right Norwegian lawmaker Christian Tybring-Gjedde, known for his Islamophobic and anti-immigration views, nominated Trump for the 2021 prize for his work on diplomatic ties between the United Arab Emirates and Israel.

Tybring-Gjedde also put Trump forward for the 2019 prize for his talks with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

Inevitably, the ads went viral for the wrong reasons:

Also on HuffPost