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Mildred Billups 2016-06-18
img

Tim Peake is preparing to return to Earth

Here are a few interesting facts about Tim Peake's mission and what will happen once he reaches Earth:

:: Tim's mission has lasted 186 days.

The rest will be jettisoned and will burn up in the atmosphere.

Video: How To Get Back To Earth From Space

:: There have only been fatalities during a Soyuz landing on two occasions: in 1967 cosmonaut Vladamir Komarov was killed returning from a one day mission when his parachute did not open and in 1971 the entire crew of Soyuz 11 were killed when, during undocking, a cabin vent valve opened causing the cabin to depressurise and the crew to suffocate.

The landing continued as planned and it was only discovered that the crew had died when the hatch was opened following the landing.

If they are lucky it will include white wool from the neck of the sheep, which is considered to be particularly valuable.

:: Once a crew is back on Earth is could take up to two years for their bones to regain the density and strength they had before launch.

collect
0
Rosalie Lee 2019-03-22
img

Boeing has delayed its first uncrewed test flight under the NASA Commercial Crew program, at least according to sources claiming to have knowledge of the matter.

The delay would be the latest in a long number of setbacks impacting the space agency’s program.

In contrast, competitor SpaceX successfully conducted its first uncrewed test flight in early March, putting it a full milestone ahead of Boeing.

The NASA Commercial Crew program has tapped two private aerospace companies, Boeing and SpaceX, to develop crewed spacecraft systems for transporting astronauts to the International Space Station.

The resulting vehicles will represent America’s return to manned spaceflight and remove its reliance on Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft.

However, the program has repeatedly suffered delays, eventually prompting NASA to seek additional seats on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft to avoid a possible interruption to its ISS presence.

collect
0
Daniel Martin 2018-06-26
img

Astronauts sit in seats worse than coach on journeys to the International Space Station (ISS).

A video released by the European Space Agency (ESA) on Monday proves it.

It shows the launch earlier this month of Soyuz MS-09 from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Interior cameras offer a view of NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Roscosmos commander Sergei Prokopyev, and ESA astronaut and flight engineer Alexander Gerst cooped up inside the Soyuz spacecraft as it heads toward the space-based outpost.

The video also includes the first-ever shots from cameras fixed to the exterior of the 50-meter-tall Soyuz rocket.

“The intense launch lasts less than 10 minutes whereby the Soyuz spacecraft is propelled 1640 km (1020 miles) and gains 210 km (130 miles) altitude,” ESA said in notes accompanying the video.

collect
0
Stephen Somogyi 2019-03-15
img

NASA has announced that its astronauts Christina Koch and Nick Hague safely arrived at the International Space Station and have since boarded the vessel.

The trip took place on Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft alongside Roscosmos’ Alexey Ovchinin; the vehicle launched for the ISS at 3:14PM EDT on March 14, according to NASA, which says the crew boarded the ISS late last night.

The Soyuz spacecraft, which NASA has purchased seats on for the last several years, docked with the ISS’s Rassvet module at 9:01PM ET after spending six hours traveling.

The spacecraft orbited four times before docking, and remained in that position until a little after 11PM, at which time the hatch was opened and the team entered the ISS.

The spacecraft’s launch took place from Kazakhstan’s Baikonur Cosmodrome, marking the start of NASA’s Expedition 59 mission, which the space agency officially started the clock on when the vehicle docked with the ISS.

The two astronauts and cosmonaut join NASA’s Anne McClain, Canada’s David Saint-Jacques, and Roscosmos’ Oleg Kononenko.

collect
0
Harvey Ayers 2016-07-07
img

Three astronauts have now successfully been put off in the Soyuz spacecraft from the Russian space base.

From left American Kate Rubin, Russian Anatoly Ivan Ishin, and Japanese Takuya Onishi.

photographer: Shamil Zhumatov / Pool via AP Photo / TT

The four-month mission on the ISS will premiere space trip for NASA Kathleen Rubins and Takuya Onishi of the Japanese Space Agency.

Even Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanisjkin on the trip.

- All is well on board, reported after launch.

collect
0
Jack Scharfenberg 2018-12-13
img

In September of 2018, Russia announced that it was investigating potential sabotage of its Soyuz rocket attached to the ISS.

An air leak was discovered aboard the ISS, and on investigation, a hole was found under a panel with evidence that a drill made the hole.

Word is that despite the hole in the spacecraft and the fact that astronauts had to resort to using epoxy to seal the hole, the crew aboard the ISS were in no danger.

Russia wasn’t content with merely fixing the leak and stated that it suspected sabotage might have been the root cause of the hole, which was initially blamed on a meteorite strike.

Later it was discovered that the hole had been created from inside the ship.

Russian cosmonauts recently performed a spacewalk to investigate the hole that has been described as “unprecedented in its complexity.”

collect
0
Michael Lofton 2018-03-21
img

NASA astronauts have to meet a lot of requirements, including having a science or engineering background and being able to pass the space agency's stringent physical tests.

One issue that won't disqualify you is a fear of heights.

Astronaut Drew Feustel, who is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on Wednesday, admits to "a mild fear of heights" in a NASA video revealing five things you didn't know about him.

He says the fear doesn't affect him when he's 250 miles (400 kilometers) above Earth.

Feustel has already proven his ability to overcome his fear of heights in pursuit of his life-long dream to be an astronaut.

His trip to the ISS will be his third space flight.

collect
0
Leon Bailey 2018-07-12
img

The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) has released a new report detailing the NASA Commercial Crew Program and delays its two contracted companies, Boeing and SpaceX, are experiencing.

Both space companies are behind schedule, with the report revealing that NASA anticipates Boeing being slightly closer to completion than SpaceX.

Back in 2014, NASA awarded both Boeing and SpaceX contracts with a total value of up to $6.8 billion.

Under the contracts, both space companies are tasked with developing commercial crew transportation systems; the eventual initial missions under these contracts will involve trips to the International Space Station.

The Government Accountability Office says it discovered in early 2017 that both companies, despite having made progress, were behind schedule.

Under the contracts, Boeing and SpaceX were supposed to give NASA “all the evidence” necessary by 2017 for the certification of the systems as meeting requirements, says the GAO report.

collect
0
Jerry Anderson 2016-07-06
img

An earlier launch of the Soyuz to the ISS Image: NASA

Three new astronauts will start a trip up to the International Space Station tonight—and it all begins with a ride on the Soyuz spacecraft.

Watch it launch live right here at 9:36 p.m. EDT.

The astronauts—NASA s Kate Rubins, JAXA s Takuya Onishi, and Roscomos Anatoly Ivanishin—will be making the trip as part of Expedition 49.

They ll be joining Expedition 48's three-person crew already aboard the ISS.

There s some new gear, including a genetic sequencer, in the cargo hold.

collect
0
Rodney Edson 2018-12-10
img

The next big step forward for NASA's Commercial Crew Program has hit a slight delay.

The first test launch of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule is now scheduled for Jan. 17.

NASA announced the change from the original Jan. 7 launch date late last week.

Currently, NASA ferries astronauts to the ISS on board the Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

The Commercial Crew Program is working to get capsules made by SpaceX and Boeing into service to allow launches from US soil.

The uncrewed SpaceX Demo-1 mission is aiming to reach orbit and the ISS with an assist from a Falcon 9 rocket.

collect
0
Mattie Wright 2018-09-04
img

Russian space chief Dmitry Rogozin yesterday said a leak found aboard a vehicle docked with the International Space Station (ISS) last week was almost certainly caused by a person with a drill.

Investigators are now scrambling to determine whether the sabotage occurred while the vehicle was in space.

News broke Monday that the damage to the vehicle, a Russian-made Soyuz spacecraft, wasn’t the result of a meteorite strike as previously believed.

According to Russian news agency TASS, Rogozin said:

We are considering all the theories.

The one about a meteorite impact has been rejected because the spaceship’s hull was evidently impacted from inside.

collect
0
Rickey Cameron 2018-09-04
img

Dimitry Rogozin, who famously suggested NASA transport its astronauts to the ISS using a trampoline, said that the hole had been caused by a drill, and identifying the culprit was "a matter of honour".

Pictures of the damage released by NASA and then mysteriously deleted (but preserved by spaceflight enthusiasts) show a puncture in the orbital module of the Soyuz spacecraft, which is due to take three crew members back to earth in December.

Earlier theories that the puncture was caused by orbital debris or a weakness in the Soyuz itself seem unlikely.

Anyone who has enjoyed a drill jumping around during an attempt to create a hole will recognise the damage.

Slightly surreally, the head of Roskosmos also asked: "Where were these actions taken – on Earth or already in orbit?"

The idea of an ISS crew member idly sticking a drill through a lovely, vacuum-warding wall seems absurd, but the space agency has a rich history of blaming cosmonauts when things go awry.

collect
0
David Carter 2018-08-31
img

A small leak has been detected on the international space station (ISS), informs the Russian rymdmyndigheten Said.

It has probably been caused by a collision with a small meteorite, but shall not constitute any danger for the crew.

– In the night and in the morning there was a special situation; a pressure drop, a syreläcka at the station, " says Roskosmoschefen Dmitry Rogozin said, according to Russian news agencies.

the hole Itself is on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft that was transporting new crew members to the station in June, which is now docked there.

It will be patched from the inside.

Aboard the ISS three astronauts from Nasa, two Russian cosmonauts and a crew member from the european (ESA).

collect
0
Randy Rowald 2018-06-08
img

The traditional hug gauntlet that greets new arrivals to the International Space Station got a festive new look today as the incumbent crew members wore matching Hawaiian shirts.

NASA's Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and Roscosmos cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev docked with the ISS on Friday and came on board to join Expedition 56.

The only thing missing were traditional flower leis.

The three crew members already on board, NASA's Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold and Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos, had a reason for wearing the bright blue shirts adorned with white flowers.

The trio previously arrived at the ISS in March in a Soyuz spacecraft flying under the call sign "Hawaii."

The Hawaiian theme doesn't end there.

collect
0
Sean Biro 2016-10-27
img

File photo: The Soyuz spacecraft capsule carrying ISS crew descends in Kazakhstan, September 7, 2016.

Living in space might be an adventure, but it can also be bad for your back.

Interesting things happen in microgravity— for example, spending a long time in space can make people taller by about two inches, according to a new study.

That same study analyzed astronauts back muscles before and after they spent months on the International Space Station, and found that the muscles atrophied while in space.

The researchers studied six astronauts— five men and one woman.

They did MRI scans of their backs at a facility in Texas before they went to space, and then again very soon after they returned to Earth, and then again later, on average a month and a half after touchdown.

collect
0
Brad Patterson 2018-10-03
img

A thorough Russian investigation of a leak that occurred in August in the orbital module of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, which is attached to the International Space Station, will not be completed until November.

But this week, the head of the Russian space agency Roscosmos reignited controversy about the leak with some comments during a television appearance.

As Rogozin did not say, this re-fueled speculation in some media reports that the hole was intentionally drilled by NASA astronauts in space.

On Aug. 29, 2018 a small hole was discovered on the International Space Station.

The hole has been identified and fixed by space station crew.

The International Space Station Program is tentatively planning a spacewalk in November to gather more information.

collect
0
Mildred Billups 2016-06-18
img

Tim Peake is preparing to return to Earth

Here are a few interesting facts about Tim Peake's mission and what will happen once he reaches Earth:

:: Tim's mission has lasted 186 days.

The rest will be jettisoned and will burn up in the atmosphere.

Video: How To Get Back To Earth From Space

:: There have only been fatalities during a Soyuz landing on two occasions: in 1967 cosmonaut Vladamir Komarov was killed returning from a one day mission when his parachute did not open and in 1971 the entire crew of Soyuz 11 were killed when, during undocking, a cabin vent valve opened causing the cabin to depressurise and the crew to suffocate.

The landing continued as planned and it was only discovered that the crew had died when the hatch was opened following the landing.

If they are lucky it will include white wool from the neck of the sheep, which is considered to be particularly valuable.

:: Once a crew is back on Earth is could take up to two years for their bones to regain the density and strength they had before launch.

Daniel Martin 2018-06-26
img

Astronauts sit in seats worse than coach on journeys to the International Space Station (ISS).

A video released by the European Space Agency (ESA) on Monday proves it.

It shows the launch earlier this month of Soyuz MS-09 from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Interior cameras offer a view of NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Roscosmos commander Sergei Prokopyev, and ESA astronaut and flight engineer Alexander Gerst cooped up inside the Soyuz spacecraft as it heads toward the space-based outpost.

The video also includes the first-ever shots from cameras fixed to the exterior of the 50-meter-tall Soyuz rocket.

“The intense launch lasts less than 10 minutes whereby the Soyuz spacecraft is propelled 1640 km (1020 miles) and gains 210 km (130 miles) altitude,” ESA said in notes accompanying the video.

Harvey Ayers 2016-07-07
img

Three astronauts have now successfully been put off in the Soyuz spacecraft from the Russian space base.

From left American Kate Rubin, Russian Anatoly Ivan Ishin, and Japanese Takuya Onishi.

photographer: Shamil Zhumatov / Pool via AP Photo / TT

The four-month mission on the ISS will premiere space trip for NASA Kathleen Rubins and Takuya Onishi of the Japanese Space Agency.

Even Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanisjkin on the trip.

- All is well on board, reported after launch.

Michael Lofton 2018-03-21
img

NASA astronauts have to meet a lot of requirements, including having a science or engineering background and being able to pass the space agency's stringent physical tests.

One issue that won't disqualify you is a fear of heights.

Astronaut Drew Feustel, who is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on Wednesday, admits to "a mild fear of heights" in a NASA video revealing five things you didn't know about him.

He says the fear doesn't affect him when he's 250 miles (400 kilometers) above Earth.

Feustel has already proven his ability to overcome his fear of heights in pursuit of his life-long dream to be an astronaut.

His trip to the ISS will be his third space flight.

Jerry Anderson 2016-07-06
img

An earlier launch of the Soyuz to the ISS Image: NASA

Three new astronauts will start a trip up to the International Space Station tonight—and it all begins with a ride on the Soyuz spacecraft.

Watch it launch live right here at 9:36 p.m. EDT.

The astronauts—NASA s Kate Rubins, JAXA s Takuya Onishi, and Roscomos Anatoly Ivanishin—will be making the trip as part of Expedition 49.

They ll be joining Expedition 48's three-person crew already aboard the ISS.

There s some new gear, including a genetic sequencer, in the cargo hold.

Mattie Wright 2018-09-04
img

Russian space chief Dmitry Rogozin yesterday said a leak found aboard a vehicle docked with the International Space Station (ISS) last week was almost certainly caused by a person with a drill.

Investigators are now scrambling to determine whether the sabotage occurred while the vehicle was in space.

News broke Monday that the damage to the vehicle, a Russian-made Soyuz spacecraft, wasn’t the result of a meteorite strike as previously believed.

According to Russian news agency TASS, Rogozin said:

We are considering all the theories.

The one about a meteorite impact has been rejected because the spaceship’s hull was evidently impacted from inside.

David Carter 2018-08-31
img

A small leak has been detected on the international space station (ISS), informs the Russian rymdmyndigheten Said.

It has probably been caused by a collision with a small meteorite, but shall not constitute any danger for the crew.

– In the night and in the morning there was a special situation; a pressure drop, a syreläcka at the station, " says Roskosmoschefen Dmitry Rogozin said, according to Russian news agencies.

the hole Itself is on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft that was transporting new crew members to the station in June, which is now docked there.

It will be patched from the inside.

Aboard the ISS three astronauts from Nasa, two Russian cosmonauts and a crew member from the european (ESA).

Sean Biro 2016-10-27
img

File photo: The Soyuz spacecraft capsule carrying ISS crew descends in Kazakhstan, September 7, 2016.

Living in space might be an adventure, but it can also be bad for your back.

Interesting things happen in microgravity— for example, spending a long time in space can make people taller by about two inches, according to a new study.

That same study analyzed astronauts back muscles before and after they spent months on the International Space Station, and found that the muscles atrophied while in space.

The researchers studied six astronauts— five men and one woman.

They did MRI scans of their backs at a facility in Texas before they went to space, and then again very soon after they returned to Earth, and then again later, on average a month and a half after touchdown.

Rosalie Lee 2019-03-22
img

Boeing has delayed its first uncrewed test flight under the NASA Commercial Crew program, at least according to sources claiming to have knowledge of the matter.

The delay would be the latest in a long number of setbacks impacting the space agency’s program.

In contrast, competitor SpaceX successfully conducted its first uncrewed test flight in early March, putting it a full milestone ahead of Boeing.

The NASA Commercial Crew program has tapped two private aerospace companies, Boeing and SpaceX, to develop crewed spacecraft systems for transporting astronauts to the International Space Station.

The resulting vehicles will represent America’s return to manned spaceflight and remove its reliance on Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft.

However, the program has repeatedly suffered delays, eventually prompting NASA to seek additional seats on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft to avoid a possible interruption to its ISS presence.

Stephen Somogyi 2019-03-15
img

NASA has announced that its astronauts Christina Koch and Nick Hague safely arrived at the International Space Station and have since boarded the vessel.

The trip took place on Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft alongside Roscosmos’ Alexey Ovchinin; the vehicle launched for the ISS at 3:14PM EDT on March 14, according to NASA, which says the crew boarded the ISS late last night.

The Soyuz spacecraft, which NASA has purchased seats on for the last several years, docked with the ISS’s Rassvet module at 9:01PM ET after spending six hours traveling.

The spacecraft orbited four times before docking, and remained in that position until a little after 11PM, at which time the hatch was opened and the team entered the ISS.

The spacecraft’s launch took place from Kazakhstan’s Baikonur Cosmodrome, marking the start of NASA’s Expedition 59 mission, which the space agency officially started the clock on when the vehicle docked with the ISS.

The two astronauts and cosmonaut join NASA’s Anne McClain, Canada’s David Saint-Jacques, and Roscosmos’ Oleg Kononenko.

Jack Scharfenberg 2018-12-13
img

In September of 2018, Russia announced that it was investigating potential sabotage of its Soyuz rocket attached to the ISS.

An air leak was discovered aboard the ISS, and on investigation, a hole was found under a panel with evidence that a drill made the hole.

Word is that despite the hole in the spacecraft and the fact that astronauts had to resort to using epoxy to seal the hole, the crew aboard the ISS were in no danger.

Russia wasn’t content with merely fixing the leak and stated that it suspected sabotage might have been the root cause of the hole, which was initially blamed on a meteorite strike.

Later it was discovered that the hole had been created from inside the ship.

Russian cosmonauts recently performed a spacewalk to investigate the hole that has been described as “unprecedented in its complexity.”

Leon Bailey 2018-07-12
img

The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) has released a new report detailing the NASA Commercial Crew Program and delays its two contracted companies, Boeing and SpaceX, are experiencing.

Both space companies are behind schedule, with the report revealing that NASA anticipates Boeing being slightly closer to completion than SpaceX.

Back in 2014, NASA awarded both Boeing and SpaceX contracts with a total value of up to $6.8 billion.

Under the contracts, both space companies are tasked with developing commercial crew transportation systems; the eventual initial missions under these contracts will involve trips to the International Space Station.

The Government Accountability Office says it discovered in early 2017 that both companies, despite having made progress, were behind schedule.

Under the contracts, Boeing and SpaceX were supposed to give NASA “all the evidence” necessary by 2017 for the certification of the systems as meeting requirements, says the GAO report.

Rodney Edson 2018-12-10
img

The next big step forward for NASA's Commercial Crew Program has hit a slight delay.

The first test launch of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule is now scheduled for Jan. 17.

NASA announced the change from the original Jan. 7 launch date late last week.

Currently, NASA ferries astronauts to the ISS on board the Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

The Commercial Crew Program is working to get capsules made by SpaceX and Boeing into service to allow launches from US soil.

The uncrewed SpaceX Demo-1 mission is aiming to reach orbit and the ISS with an assist from a Falcon 9 rocket.

Rickey Cameron 2018-09-04
img

Dimitry Rogozin, who famously suggested NASA transport its astronauts to the ISS using a trampoline, said that the hole had been caused by a drill, and identifying the culprit was "a matter of honour".

Pictures of the damage released by NASA and then mysteriously deleted (but preserved by spaceflight enthusiasts) show a puncture in the orbital module of the Soyuz spacecraft, which is due to take three crew members back to earth in December.

Earlier theories that the puncture was caused by orbital debris or a weakness in the Soyuz itself seem unlikely.

Anyone who has enjoyed a drill jumping around during an attempt to create a hole will recognise the damage.

Slightly surreally, the head of Roskosmos also asked: "Where were these actions taken – on Earth or already in orbit?"

The idea of an ISS crew member idly sticking a drill through a lovely, vacuum-warding wall seems absurd, but the space agency has a rich history of blaming cosmonauts when things go awry.

Randy Rowald 2018-06-08
img

The traditional hug gauntlet that greets new arrivals to the International Space Station got a festive new look today as the incumbent crew members wore matching Hawaiian shirts.

NASA's Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and Roscosmos cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev docked with the ISS on Friday and came on board to join Expedition 56.

The only thing missing were traditional flower leis.

The three crew members already on board, NASA's Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold and Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos, had a reason for wearing the bright blue shirts adorned with white flowers.

The trio previously arrived at the ISS in March in a Soyuz spacecraft flying under the call sign "Hawaii."

The Hawaiian theme doesn't end there.

Brad Patterson 2018-10-03
img

A thorough Russian investigation of a leak that occurred in August in the orbital module of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, which is attached to the International Space Station, will not be completed until November.

But this week, the head of the Russian space agency Roscosmos reignited controversy about the leak with some comments during a television appearance.

As Rogozin did not say, this re-fueled speculation in some media reports that the hole was intentionally drilled by NASA astronauts in space.

On Aug. 29, 2018 a small hole was discovered on the International Space Station.

The hole has been identified and fixed by space station crew.

The International Space Station Program is tentatively planning a spacewalk in November to gather more information.