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Freddie Gagne 2021-01-06
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(Staffordshire University) Staffordshire University is hosting a virtual international interdisciplinary conference and festival on 24 April 2021.
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Alfred Borrow 2019-03-02
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A growing body of research suggests that the virtual world can show you what you are truly capable of.

For instance, one piece of research has found that a player’s real values match their in-game decisions, suggesting that their true personality often gets reflected in a game scenario.

Some of us are fortunate enough to be aware of these kinds of skills and can take advantage of them in real life as well as in the virtual world.

This is a psychological phenomenon characterized by an extreme focus on tasks, an innate sense of joy, matching our skill level with the level of challenge and, interestingly, a total lack of self-consciousness.

In other words, we are so involved in the game scenario that we are reacting more authentically instead of filtering behavior through our perceived social expectations and rules.

At the very least, there should be a way for the persistence, problem-solving skills and motivation of many game players to be transferred to their ordinary working lives.

collect
0
komal waghmare 2021-01-20

Summary – A new market study, “Global Visual Effects Education Market Size, Status and Forecast 2020-2026” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.This report focuses on the global Visual Effects Education status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players.

The study objectives are to present the Visual Effects Education development in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and Central & South America.

The key players covered in this studyLesleyBallyfermot College of Further EducationGnomonAcademy of Art UniversityBournemouth UniversityFilmakademie Baden-WuerttembergGnomon School of VFX and AnimationLost Boys StudiosRingling College of Art and DesignSavannah College of Art and DesignSheridan CollegeThink Tank Training CentreVancouver Film SchoolStaffordshire UniversityARTFXALSO READ : https://www.abnewswire.com/pressreleases/covid19-impact-on-global-visual-effects-education-market-2020-industry-analysis-size-share-growth-trends-forecast-to-2026_484219.htmlMarket segment by Type, the product can be split intoUndergraduate ProgramsGraduate ProgramsMarket segment by Application, split intoCompany GroupPersonalALSO READ : https://www.newyorktelegraph.com/news/263036738/multi-vendor-it-support-services-market-global-key-players-trends-share-industry-size-growth-opportunities-forecast-to-2024Market segment by Regions/Countries, this report coversNorth AmericaEuropeChinaJapanSoutheast AsiaIndiaCentral & South AmericaALSO READ : http://www.marketwatch.com/story/target-drone-market-2021-global-analysis-share-trend-key-players-opportunities-forecast-to-2026-2021-01-11The study objectives of this report are:To analyze global Visual Effects Education status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players.To present the Visual Effects Education development in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and Central & South America.ALSO READ : http://www.marketwatch.com/story/green-construction-material-market-2020-global-trend-segmentation-and-opportunities-forecast-to-2026-2021-01-04To strategically profile the key players and comprehensively analyze their development plan and strategies.To define, describe and forecast the market by type, market and key regions.ALSO READ : http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-eyebrow-stencils-market-2020-size-share-demand-trends-growth-and-2026-forecasts-2021-01-05In this study, the years considered to estimate the market size of Visual Effects Education are as follows:History Year: 2015-2019Base Year: 2019Estimated Year: 2020Forecast Year 2020 to 2026For the data information by region, company, type and application, 2019 is considered as the base year.

Whenever data information was unavailable for the base year, the prior year has been considered.About Us:Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Research Consultants Pvt.

Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe.

Contact Us: NORAH TRENT                                                      [email protected]       Ph: +162-825-80070 (US)                          Ph: +44 2035002763 (UK)   

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0
Joan Zappulla 2018-04-06
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by Sarah Rose, Lecturer in Developmental Psychology, Staffordshire University

Bedtime can often be a trying experience for young children – and their parents.

One regular element of the routine for many families is the children’s TV show In the Night Garden.

Narrated by classical actor Derek Jacobi, it is a programme which aims to calm and relax toddlers before a good night’s sleep – and has been broadcast almost every bedtime on the BBC channel CBeebies for the past 11 years.

In the Night Garden’s colourful mix of characters and concepts can seem surreal – and even incomprehensible to adult viewers.

But it certainly seems to engage young children – and uses a mixture of key tools to entertain and entrance its target audience.

collect
0
Mark Maynard 2016-05-24
img

Staffordshire Police said it was "a concept" that could become significant.

Dr Sturdy Colls said: "What we want to do is to come up with the best solution that helps the criminal justice system - help the police in their detection and recording of crime and then to help jurors in court to understand those crimes better that they ever did before."

If a barrister could do this, he or she could easily show the jury the scene of the crime without any confusion.

Simon Tweats, head of justice services at Staffordshire Police, said it could make a significant difference with regard to how evidence was presented and "bring to life" complex scenes.

But Jason Holt, a barrister at Steven Solicitors, said he was "sceptical" about the technology and whether it would make a real impact on cases.

"We've recently gone on to a digital system within the Crown court and it's causing significant delays; the systems we're using break down, the technology isn't sufficient and we go back to pen and paper.

collect
0
John Wyckoff 2016-05-25
img

Jurors could use virtual reality to enter a crime scene

Using virtual reality VR technology jurors could soon be able to enter crime scenes.

"VR is going to be most social platform and we've created new teams at Facebook to build the next generation of social apps and VR," Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had earlier said.

The technology, which is expected to first make inroads in the video gaming industry, would go on to bring about major changes in the field of education, entertainment and retail.

Speaking to BBC, Caroline Sturdy Colls, associate professor for forensic said, "What we want to do is to come up with the best solution that helps the criminal justice system - help the police in their detection and recording of crime and then to help jurors in court to understand those crimes better that they ever did before."

"We don't have a very good track record with bringing technology into court rooms," said Jason Holt, a barrister at Steven Solicitors.

"We've recently gone on to a digital system within the Crown court and it's causing significant delays; the systems we're using break down, the technology isn't sufficient and we go back to pen and paper.

collect
0
Robbie Kromer 2017-06-15
img

Many sports have faced new challenges and opportunities because of the extraordinary changes technological advances have wrought in the past two decades.

But that is true of F1 perhaps more than most, having stuck with a long outdated model that has increasingly failed to engage with a younger audience.

Several weeks ago McLaren announced their World’s Fastest Gamer programme – an annual competition in which video gamers will compete to win a job as a simulator driver for the team.

Last month MotoGP announced it would launch an e-sports championship this year, a multi-year project with the stated aim of becoming “the most important racing e-sport championship”.

Equally this weekend the greatest sports car race in the world, the Le Mans 24 Hours, will also host the final of the third season of the Xbox-based Forza racing championship.

In April it was announced that professional gaming will be an official medal sport in the 2022 Asian Games and Staffordshire University recently declared it would launch the UK’s first degree in e-sports in September 2018.

collect
0
Joe Richards 2016-05-24
img

Researchers at Staffordshire University in the UK are working on a way for jurors to get a whole lot more insight into the alleged crimes that they are asked to rule on, according to a report from the BBC.

In essence, the project combines increasingly ubiquitous virtual reality VR headsets with green screen technology to transport people to a crime scene.

Of course, to achieve this requires a change in the way data and other information is collected at a crime scene; it s not as simple as just slapping on a VR headset.

To achieve its needs, the project – which has received just over $200,000 £140,000 in funding via an EC grant – has experimented with things like lasers and drones, so a more complete digital reconstruction can be built from any crime scene.

While the potential for revolutionizing the courtroom with technology makes a compelling argument – simplicity around details for jurors could help complex cases – it also potentially leaves open the possibility that the crime scenes are contaminated or perhaps more accurately, biased in a new way: if the data collection wasn t done properly, jurors could see themselves missing out on key evidence in a case.

Read next: Facebook says its Trending Topics picks weren't biased, but is fixing its policies anyway

collect
0
Calvin Bourque 2019-11-12
img

A GLOBAL project which aims to map the demographics of diabetic foot complications experienced across the world has been announced today, World Diabetes Day (November 14) .

Professor Nachiappan Chockalingam, Director of the Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies at Staffordshire University, is leading the project which aims to give a comprehensive picture of problems, including lower limb amputations, caused as a result of diabetes.

Professor Chockalingam said: "Diabetes is a growing global health problem and diabetic foot disease is one of the most expensive complications of diabetes leading to significant morbidity and mortality in the adult population."

"Whilst there is a substantial information on the global burden of the diabetes, there is little information relating to the complications resulting from diabetes and no specific data on amputations or mobility related assistive devices."

Previous work carried out by Staffordshire University's Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies has highlighted the limitations of diabetic foot screening guidelines which aim to identify those patients at risk of foot complications, such as ulcerations and amputations.

Professor Chockalingam, a leading scientist in the area of biomechanics of the diabetic foot, explained that they would be working with World Health Organisation collaborating centres for diabetes in Japan and India to collect the new dataset by Spring 2020.

collect
0
Charlie Warren 2016-05-24
img

View photosMoreHttps%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f96440%2fhtcvvv8

Using virtual reality to transport viewers to another place or time is on the rise when it comes to gaming and virtual tourism.

But a new program in the UK is harnessing the technology to help jurors in criminal cases experience and relate to crime scenes during evidence presentations.

The program, according to a BBC report, is being led by a Staffordshire University research group and supported by a research grant of more than $200,000 from the European Commission.

Using VR headsets, cameras and traditional green screen effects, the research group has put together a system that plunges jurors into the middle of a crime scene while simultaneously allowing an attorney to guide viewers through the scene and its evidence.

"Doing that in a way that is far easier for juries to understand and appreciate — which can only be good for everybody, for prosecution and defense," Simon Tweats, the head of justice services at Staffordshire Police, told the BBC.

While bringing this kind of technology into the courtroom is indeed innovative, it's not the first time researchers have collected criminal trial evidence and used it to produce VR environments.

collect
0
Freddie Gagne 2021-01-06
img
(Staffordshire University) Staffordshire University is hosting a virtual international interdisciplinary conference and festival on 24 April 2021.
komal waghmare 2021-01-20

Summary – A new market study, “Global Visual Effects Education Market Size, Status and Forecast 2020-2026” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.This report focuses on the global Visual Effects Education status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players.

The study objectives are to present the Visual Effects Education development in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and Central & South America.

The key players covered in this studyLesleyBallyfermot College of Further EducationGnomonAcademy of Art UniversityBournemouth UniversityFilmakademie Baden-WuerttembergGnomon School of VFX and AnimationLost Boys StudiosRingling College of Art and DesignSavannah College of Art and DesignSheridan CollegeThink Tank Training CentreVancouver Film SchoolStaffordshire UniversityARTFXALSO READ : https://www.abnewswire.com/pressreleases/covid19-impact-on-global-visual-effects-education-market-2020-industry-analysis-size-share-growth-trends-forecast-to-2026_484219.htmlMarket segment by Type, the product can be split intoUndergraduate ProgramsGraduate ProgramsMarket segment by Application, split intoCompany GroupPersonalALSO READ : https://www.newyorktelegraph.com/news/263036738/multi-vendor-it-support-services-market-global-key-players-trends-share-industry-size-growth-opportunities-forecast-to-2024Market segment by Regions/Countries, this report coversNorth AmericaEuropeChinaJapanSoutheast AsiaIndiaCentral & South AmericaALSO READ : http://www.marketwatch.com/story/target-drone-market-2021-global-analysis-share-trend-key-players-opportunities-forecast-to-2026-2021-01-11The study objectives of this report are:To analyze global Visual Effects Education status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players.To present the Visual Effects Education development in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and Central & South America.ALSO READ : http://www.marketwatch.com/story/green-construction-material-market-2020-global-trend-segmentation-and-opportunities-forecast-to-2026-2021-01-04To strategically profile the key players and comprehensively analyze their development plan and strategies.To define, describe and forecast the market by type, market and key regions.ALSO READ : http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-eyebrow-stencils-market-2020-size-share-demand-trends-growth-and-2026-forecasts-2021-01-05In this study, the years considered to estimate the market size of Visual Effects Education are as follows:History Year: 2015-2019Base Year: 2019Estimated Year: 2020Forecast Year 2020 to 2026For the data information by region, company, type and application, 2019 is considered as the base year.

Whenever data information was unavailable for the base year, the prior year has been considered.About Us:Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Research Consultants Pvt.

Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe.

Contact Us: NORAH TRENT                                                      [email protected]       Ph: +162-825-80070 (US)                          Ph: +44 2035002763 (UK)   

Mark Maynard 2016-05-24
img

Staffordshire Police said it was "a concept" that could become significant.

Dr Sturdy Colls said: "What we want to do is to come up with the best solution that helps the criminal justice system - help the police in their detection and recording of crime and then to help jurors in court to understand those crimes better that they ever did before."

If a barrister could do this, he or she could easily show the jury the scene of the crime without any confusion.

Simon Tweats, head of justice services at Staffordshire Police, said it could make a significant difference with regard to how evidence was presented and "bring to life" complex scenes.

But Jason Holt, a barrister at Steven Solicitors, said he was "sceptical" about the technology and whether it would make a real impact on cases.

"We've recently gone on to a digital system within the Crown court and it's causing significant delays; the systems we're using break down, the technology isn't sufficient and we go back to pen and paper.

Robbie Kromer 2017-06-15
img

Many sports have faced new challenges and opportunities because of the extraordinary changes technological advances have wrought in the past two decades.

But that is true of F1 perhaps more than most, having stuck with a long outdated model that has increasingly failed to engage with a younger audience.

Several weeks ago McLaren announced their World’s Fastest Gamer programme – an annual competition in which video gamers will compete to win a job as a simulator driver for the team.

Last month MotoGP announced it would launch an e-sports championship this year, a multi-year project with the stated aim of becoming “the most important racing e-sport championship”.

Equally this weekend the greatest sports car race in the world, the Le Mans 24 Hours, will also host the final of the third season of the Xbox-based Forza racing championship.

In April it was announced that professional gaming will be an official medal sport in the 2022 Asian Games and Staffordshire University recently declared it would launch the UK’s first degree in e-sports in September 2018.

Calvin Bourque 2019-11-12
img

A GLOBAL project which aims to map the demographics of diabetic foot complications experienced across the world has been announced today, World Diabetes Day (November 14) .

Professor Nachiappan Chockalingam, Director of the Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies at Staffordshire University, is leading the project which aims to give a comprehensive picture of problems, including lower limb amputations, caused as a result of diabetes.

Professor Chockalingam said: "Diabetes is a growing global health problem and diabetic foot disease is one of the most expensive complications of diabetes leading to significant morbidity and mortality in the adult population."

"Whilst there is a substantial information on the global burden of the diabetes, there is little information relating to the complications resulting from diabetes and no specific data on amputations or mobility related assistive devices."

Previous work carried out by Staffordshire University's Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies has highlighted the limitations of diabetic foot screening guidelines which aim to identify those patients at risk of foot complications, such as ulcerations and amputations.

Professor Chockalingam, a leading scientist in the area of biomechanics of the diabetic foot, explained that they would be working with World Health Organisation collaborating centres for diabetes in Japan and India to collect the new dataset by Spring 2020.

Alfred Borrow 2019-03-02
img

A growing body of research suggests that the virtual world can show you what you are truly capable of.

For instance, one piece of research has found that a player’s real values match their in-game decisions, suggesting that their true personality often gets reflected in a game scenario.

Some of us are fortunate enough to be aware of these kinds of skills and can take advantage of them in real life as well as in the virtual world.

This is a psychological phenomenon characterized by an extreme focus on tasks, an innate sense of joy, matching our skill level with the level of challenge and, interestingly, a total lack of self-consciousness.

In other words, we are so involved in the game scenario that we are reacting more authentically instead of filtering behavior through our perceived social expectations and rules.

At the very least, there should be a way for the persistence, problem-solving skills and motivation of many game players to be transferred to their ordinary working lives.

Joan Zappulla 2018-04-06
img

by Sarah Rose, Lecturer in Developmental Psychology, Staffordshire University

Bedtime can often be a trying experience for young children – and their parents.

One regular element of the routine for many families is the children’s TV show In the Night Garden.

Narrated by classical actor Derek Jacobi, it is a programme which aims to calm and relax toddlers before a good night’s sleep – and has been broadcast almost every bedtime on the BBC channel CBeebies for the past 11 years.

In the Night Garden’s colourful mix of characters and concepts can seem surreal – and even incomprehensible to adult viewers.

But it certainly seems to engage young children – and uses a mixture of key tools to entertain and entrance its target audience.

John Wyckoff 2016-05-25
img

Jurors could use virtual reality to enter a crime scene

Using virtual reality VR technology jurors could soon be able to enter crime scenes.

"VR is going to be most social platform and we've created new teams at Facebook to build the next generation of social apps and VR," Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had earlier said.

The technology, which is expected to first make inroads in the video gaming industry, would go on to bring about major changes in the field of education, entertainment and retail.

Speaking to BBC, Caroline Sturdy Colls, associate professor for forensic said, "What we want to do is to come up with the best solution that helps the criminal justice system - help the police in their detection and recording of crime and then to help jurors in court to understand those crimes better that they ever did before."

"We don't have a very good track record with bringing technology into court rooms," said Jason Holt, a barrister at Steven Solicitors.

"We've recently gone on to a digital system within the Crown court and it's causing significant delays; the systems we're using break down, the technology isn't sufficient and we go back to pen and paper.

Joe Richards 2016-05-24
img

Researchers at Staffordshire University in the UK are working on a way for jurors to get a whole lot more insight into the alleged crimes that they are asked to rule on, according to a report from the BBC.

In essence, the project combines increasingly ubiquitous virtual reality VR headsets with green screen technology to transport people to a crime scene.

Of course, to achieve this requires a change in the way data and other information is collected at a crime scene; it s not as simple as just slapping on a VR headset.

To achieve its needs, the project – which has received just over $200,000 £140,000 in funding via an EC grant – has experimented with things like lasers and drones, so a more complete digital reconstruction can be built from any crime scene.

While the potential for revolutionizing the courtroom with technology makes a compelling argument – simplicity around details for jurors could help complex cases – it also potentially leaves open the possibility that the crime scenes are contaminated or perhaps more accurately, biased in a new way: if the data collection wasn t done properly, jurors could see themselves missing out on key evidence in a case.

Read next: Facebook says its Trending Topics picks weren't biased, but is fixing its policies anyway

Charlie Warren 2016-05-24
img

View photosMoreHttps%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f96440%2fhtcvvv8

Using virtual reality to transport viewers to another place or time is on the rise when it comes to gaming and virtual tourism.

But a new program in the UK is harnessing the technology to help jurors in criminal cases experience and relate to crime scenes during evidence presentations.

The program, according to a BBC report, is being led by a Staffordshire University research group and supported by a research grant of more than $200,000 from the European Commission.

Using VR headsets, cameras and traditional green screen effects, the research group has put together a system that plunges jurors into the middle of a crime scene while simultaneously allowing an attorney to guide viewers through the scene and its evidence.

"Doing that in a way that is far easier for juries to understand and appreciate — which can only be good for everybody, for prosecution and defense," Simon Tweats, the head of justice services at Staffordshire Police, told the BBC.

While bringing this kind of technology into the courtroom is indeed innovative, it's not the first time researchers have collected criminal trial evidence and used it to produce VR environments.