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James Farr 2018-01-29
img

Bill Gates loves to read, and he often shares his favorite recent books.

On Friday, the Microsoft co-founder revealed that a new book has made its way to the top of his favorites-of-all-time list.

Gates dubbed "Enlightenment Now" by cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker his new fave.

In "Enlightenment Now," Pinker "(tracks) violence throughout history and applies it to 15 different measures of progress (like quality of life, knowledge, and safety)," Gates writes.

"The result is a holistic picture of how and why the world is getting better."

So why don't we hear as much about the improvements in the world as we do about the terrible events?

collect
0
Gaston Alexander 2017-02-14
img

But these problems are not insurmountable - as Steven Pinker argues in The Better Angels of Our Nature, despite what it looks like, war is actually on the decline.

Better still, Piers Morgan is slowly fading into obscurity too, having fallen from a prime time chat show in America to picking pathetic fights with people on Twitter.

If this trend continues, his career could be completely eradicated in our lifetimes.

While everything else is getting better, inequality is actually increasing according to many metrics.

Not wealth inequality - that problem is far too hard and I m a few economics PhDs shy of being able to figure that out.

But happiness inequality - specifically regarding today, February 14th.

collect
0
Warren Edwards 2017-02-14
img

But these problems are not insurmountable - as Steven Pinker argues in The Better Angels of Our Nature, despite what it looks like, war is actually on the decline.

Better still, Piers Morgan is slowly fading into obscurity too, having fallen from a prime time chat show in America to picking pathetic fights with people on Twitter.

If this trend continues, his career could be completely eradicated in our lifetimes.

While everything else is getting better, inequality is actually increasing according to many metrics.

Not wealth inequality - that problem is far too hard and I m a few economics PhDs shy of being able to figure that out.

But happiness inequality - specifically regarding today, February 14th.

collect
0
Jennifer True 2017-03-08

For WIRED's Smart List, we ask industry leaders – from Melinda Gates to Richard Branson, Steven Pinker to Jennifer Doudna – to name a person in their field who they think will become a global force in the future.

See the first 10 below, and pick up the full list in this month's issue of WIRED.

Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack selects:

Nina Tandon, Co-founder and CEO of EpiBone

Stewart Butterfield's failures have shaped the way we use the internet.

In 2012, realising his second online game would never recoup the millions of dollars investors had put into it, Butterfield switched gears and built Slack, a work messaging app that grew out of the chat system his company used while building the game.

collect
0
Gladys Wiggins 2017-09-27
img

The times change, the tools change -- but human nature is perpetual.

As Daniel Pink once said, “There’s a gap between what science knows and what business does.” The study of psychology and its application for marketing to consumers has been brought about by the attempt to bridge this gap.

For the lay marketer, the problem is finding practical sources of inspiration.

Stodgy academic writing -- often criticized by Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker -- and sensational headlines have made it hard to decipher which research results are worth testing.

Related: The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding

As one extra step in helping marketers and salesman improve their ethical persuasive efforts, I compiled a list of 10 must-know psychology studies in my 10 Ways to Convert More Customers (Using Psychology) resource.

collect
0
Mark Maynard 2016-11-04
img

Just like a fish can not see water, you can not see culture, yet it influences all of our decisions.

If the culture is an ethnic group, it is a formal language such as French, a subculture like a motorcycle gang will use own slang.

A fish can not see water, you can not see culture

Culture causes you to see things differently

Ever since humans gained consciousness, social norms, beliefs, rituals and group behavior became the heart and soul of human activity.

More details of this study are available here Westerners and Easterners see the world differently.

collect
0
Steven Sentell 2017-05-16
img

p Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates offered new college graduates some valuable advice this week in 14 simple tweets.

The tech titan and richest man in the world, who dropped out of Harvard in 1975, took to Twitter on Monday to share his top tips for new graduates, lessons he wished he had learned before leaving college, and some of his biggest regrets.

"New college graduates often ask me for career advice," he wrote in a series of tweets, starting off with a reference to the classic movie "The Graduate".

Intelligence, for instance, is "not one-dimensional" and takes many different forms.

Gates also delved into some of his biggest regrets after dropping out of college.

Took me decades to learn," he said.

collect
0
George Comer 2017-11-27
img

Over the years, the trio has sung the praises of several books that influenced the way they see the world, from their approach to technological innovation to how they manage their businesses.

"The Remains of the Day" by Kazuo Ishiguro

"This is Kazuo Ishiguro's profoundly compelling portrait of Stevens, the perfect butler, and of his fading, insular world in post-World War II England.

But lurking in his memory are doubts about the true nature of Lord Darlington's 'greatness,' and much graver doubts about the nature of his own life."

The undisputed merchant king of the late twentieth century, Sam never lost the common touch.

"Read by everyone from Warren Buffett to Jeff Bezos to Tom Peters ('I love this book,' the coauthor of In Search of Excellence said), Greenberg's 'Memos From the Chairman' comprise a unique — and uniquely simple — management philosophy.

collect
0
Johnny Huff 2016-08-10
img

Billionaire Bill Gates has said he reads about a book a week.

We sifted through years of his book recommendations to find 12

that made especially strong impressions on him.

out why he enjoyed each one.Mike Nudelman/Business InsiderHere are the links to find each book: "Tap Dancing to Work" by Carol Loomis "Making the Modern World" by Vaclav Smil "The Sixth Extinction" by Elizabeth Kolbert "Stress Test" by Timothy Geithner "The Better Angels of Our Nature" by Steven Pinker "The Man Who Fed the World" by Leon Hesser "Business Adventures" by John Brooks "The Bully Pulpit" by Doris Kearns Goodwin "The Rosie Project" by Graeme Simsion "On Immunity" by Eula Biss "How Asia Works" by Joe Studwell "How to Lie With Statistics" by Darrell HuffDrake Baer contributed

NOW WATCH: This drummer created a whole song using only the sound of coinsLoading video...

collect
0
Matthew Hansen 2018-02-24
img

Alien invasion is a constant theme of Hollywood science fiction, from War of the Worlds to Independence Day.

But Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker, author of the new book Enlightenment Now, argues that highly developed civilizations tend toward peace and tolerance, and that advanced aliens are much more likely to be friendly.

“I think it’s not inconceivable that wars between countries will go the way of slave auctions and dueling, just be seen as too ridiculous for any reasonable country to engage in,” Pinker says in Episode 296 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast.

“And maybe that’s the natural arc of civilizations, including ones on other planets.”

But wouldn’t alien brains be so different from ours that it would make mutual understanding impossible?

On the contrary, since aliens would have been subject to the same evolutionary pressures as us, they would probably possess an appreciation of science—and maybe even beauty—similar to ours.

collect
0
Wayne Strickland 2018-04-09
img

The positive ones say Pinker argues convincingly that we should be deeply grateful for the Enlightenment and should put our stock in its legacy.

A handful of European thinkers who were born a few centuries ago set our species firmly on the path of progress with their compelling commitment to science, reason, and humanism (where humanism means “maximizing human flourishing”).

In particular, he recognizes the big kink in his famously optimistic take on the future: Though reason can help us solve the problems facing humankind, our species isn’t great at reasoning.

The answer may depend on your position on the climate change question—and that fact makes it hard to change people’s minds about climate change and thus build the consensus needed to address the problem.

Pinker also understands that cognitive biases can be activated by tribalism.

So far so good: These insights would seem to prepare the ground for a trenchant analysis of what ails the world—certainly including what ails an America now famously beset by political polarization, by ideological warfare that seems less and less metaphorical.

collect
0
Daniel Murdock 2018-04-22
img

In The Better Angels of Our Nature, Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker makes the case for reading as a “technology for perspective-taking” that has the capacity to not only evoke people’s empathy but also expand it.

While this may sound trite, it was actually a seismic innovation for people in the pre-industrial age who didn’t see, hear or interact with those outside of their village.

Empathy technologies expand our access to diverse literature, allow us to more deeply understand each other and create opportunities for meaningful collaboration across racial, cultural, geographic and class backgrounds.

Teachers who are on the front lines of this growing diversity consider it their job to help students and employees become better perspective-takers.

In the rich depth of literature, we empathize with the protagonist, and when their flaws are inevitably revealed, we are humbled and see ourselves in their complex, imperfect lives.

Research has since proven that those who read more literary fiction are better at detecting and understanding others’ emotions.

collect
0
Steven Jones 2020-10-26
img

by Adam Singolda, founder and CEO, Taboola While the term AI can be found in virtually every investor’s deck and every company’s page on the web, it’s actually quite rare to witness real artificial intelligence at work — because it’s a very complicated thing to do. There is a world of difference between machine learning […]

The post Solving content moderation requires humans, AI is not good enough appeared first on Digiday.

collect
0
James Farr 2018-01-29
img

Bill Gates loves to read, and he often shares his favorite recent books.

On Friday, the Microsoft co-founder revealed that a new book has made its way to the top of his favorites-of-all-time list.

Gates dubbed "Enlightenment Now" by cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker his new fave.

In "Enlightenment Now," Pinker "(tracks) violence throughout history and applies it to 15 different measures of progress (like quality of life, knowledge, and safety)," Gates writes.

"The result is a holistic picture of how and why the world is getting better."

So why don't we hear as much about the improvements in the world as we do about the terrible events?

Warren Edwards 2017-02-14
img

But these problems are not insurmountable - as Steven Pinker argues in The Better Angels of Our Nature, despite what it looks like, war is actually on the decline.

Better still, Piers Morgan is slowly fading into obscurity too, having fallen from a prime time chat show in America to picking pathetic fights with people on Twitter.

If this trend continues, his career could be completely eradicated in our lifetimes.

While everything else is getting better, inequality is actually increasing according to many metrics.

Not wealth inequality - that problem is far too hard and I m a few economics PhDs shy of being able to figure that out.

But happiness inequality - specifically regarding today, February 14th.

Gladys Wiggins 2017-09-27
img

The times change, the tools change -- but human nature is perpetual.

As Daniel Pink once said, “There’s a gap between what science knows and what business does.” The study of psychology and its application for marketing to consumers has been brought about by the attempt to bridge this gap.

For the lay marketer, the problem is finding practical sources of inspiration.

Stodgy academic writing -- often criticized by Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker -- and sensational headlines have made it hard to decipher which research results are worth testing.

Related: The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding

As one extra step in helping marketers and salesman improve their ethical persuasive efforts, I compiled a list of 10 must-know psychology studies in my 10 Ways to Convert More Customers (Using Psychology) resource.

Steven Sentell 2017-05-16
img

p Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates offered new college graduates some valuable advice this week in 14 simple tweets.

The tech titan and richest man in the world, who dropped out of Harvard in 1975, took to Twitter on Monday to share his top tips for new graduates, lessons he wished he had learned before leaving college, and some of his biggest regrets.

"New college graduates often ask me for career advice," he wrote in a series of tweets, starting off with a reference to the classic movie "The Graduate".

Intelligence, for instance, is "not one-dimensional" and takes many different forms.

Gates also delved into some of his biggest regrets after dropping out of college.

Took me decades to learn," he said.

Johnny Huff 2016-08-10
img

Billionaire Bill Gates has said he reads about a book a week.

We sifted through years of his book recommendations to find 12

that made especially strong impressions on him.

out why he enjoyed each one.Mike Nudelman/Business InsiderHere are the links to find each book: "Tap Dancing to Work" by Carol Loomis "Making the Modern World" by Vaclav Smil "The Sixth Extinction" by Elizabeth Kolbert "Stress Test" by Timothy Geithner "The Better Angels of Our Nature" by Steven Pinker "The Man Who Fed the World" by Leon Hesser "Business Adventures" by John Brooks "The Bully Pulpit" by Doris Kearns Goodwin "The Rosie Project" by Graeme Simsion "On Immunity" by Eula Biss "How Asia Works" by Joe Studwell "How to Lie With Statistics" by Darrell HuffDrake Baer contributed

NOW WATCH: This drummer created a whole song using only the sound of coinsLoading video...

Wayne Strickland 2018-04-09
img

The positive ones say Pinker argues convincingly that we should be deeply grateful for the Enlightenment and should put our stock in its legacy.

A handful of European thinkers who were born a few centuries ago set our species firmly on the path of progress with their compelling commitment to science, reason, and humanism (where humanism means “maximizing human flourishing”).

In particular, he recognizes the big kink in his famously optimistic take on the future: Though reason can help us solve the problems facing humankind, our species isn’t great at reasoning.

The answer may depend on your position on the climate change question—and that fact makes it hard to change people’s minds about climate change and thus build the consensus needed to address the problem.

Pinker also understands that cognitive biases can be activated by tribalism.

So far so good: These insights would seem to prepare the ground for a trenchant analysis of what ails the world—certainly including what ails an America now famously beset by political polarization, by ideological warfare that seems less and less metaphorical.

Steven Jones 2020-10-26
img

by Adam Singolda, founder and CEO, Taboola While the term AI can be found in virtually every investor’s deck and every company’s page on the web, it’s actually quite rare to witness real artificial intelligence at work — because it’s a very complicated thing to do. There is a world of difference between machine learning […]

The post Solving content moderation requires humans, AI is not good enough appeared first on Digiday.

Gaston Alexander 2017-02-14
img

But these problems are not insurmountable - as Steven Pinker argues in The Better Angels of Our Nature, despite what it looks like, war is actually on the decline.

Better still, Piers Morgan is slowly fading into obscurity too, having fallen from a prime time chat show in America to picking pathetic fights with people on Twitter.

If this trend continues, his career could be completely eradicated in our lifetimes.

While everything else is getting better, inequality is actually increasing according to many metrics.

Not wealth inequality - that problem is far too hard and I m a few economics PhDs shy of being able to figure that out.

But happiness inequality - specifically regarding today, February 14th.

Jennifer True 2017-03-08

For WIRED's Smart List, we ask industry leaders – from Melinda Gates to Richard Branson, Steven Pinker to Jennifer Doudna – to name a person in their field who they think will become a global force in the future.

See the first 10 below, and pick up the full list in this month's issue of WIRED.

Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack selects:

Nina Tandon, Co-founder and CEO of EpiBone

Stewart Butterfield's failures have shaped the way we use the internet.

In 2012, realising his second online game would never recoup the millions of dollars investors had put into it, Butterfield switched gears and built Slack, a work messaging app that grew out of the chat system his company used while building the game.

Mark Maynard 2016-11-04
img

Just like a fish can not see water, you can not see culture, yet it influences all of our decisions.

If the culture is an ethnic group, it is a formal language such as French, a subculture like a motorcycle gang will use own slang.

A fish can not see water, you can not see culture

Culture causes you to see things differently

Ever since humans gained consciousness, social norms, beliefs, rituals and group behavior became the heart and soul of human activity.

More details of this study are available here Westerners and Easterners see the world differently.

George Comer 2017-11-27
img

Over the years, the trio has sung the praises of several books that influenced the way they see the world, from their approach to technological innovation to how they manage their businesses.

"The Remains of the Day" by Kazuo Ishiguro

"This is Kazuo Ishiguro's profoundly compelling portrait of Stevens, the perfect butler, and of his fading, insular world in post-World War II England.

But lurking in his memory are doubts about the true nature of Lord Darlington's 'greatness,' and much graver doubts about the nature of his own life."

The undisputed merchant king of the late twentieth century, Sam never lost the common touch.

"Read by everyone from Warren Buffett to Jeff Bezos to Tom Peters ('I love this book,' the coauthor of In Search of Excellence said), Greenberg's 'Memos From the Chairman' comprise a unique — and uniquely simple — management philosophy.

Matthew Hansen 2018-02-24
img

Alien invasion is a constant theme of Hollywood science fiction, from War of the Worlds to Independence Day.

But Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker, author of the new book Enlightenment Now, argues that highly developed civilizations tend toward peace and tolerance, and that advanced aliens are much more likely to be friendly.

“I think it’s not inconceivable that wars between countries will go the way of slave auctions and dueling, just be seen as too ridiculous for any reasonable country to engage in,” Pinker says in Episode 296 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast.

“And maybe that’s the natural arc of civilizations, including ones on other planets.”

But wouldn’t alien brains be so different from ours that it would make mutual understanding impossible?

On the contrary, since aliens would have been subject to the same evolutionary pressures as us, they would probably possess an appreciation of science—and maybe even beauty—similar to ours.

Daniel Murdock 2018-04-22
img

In The Better Angels of Our Nature, Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker makes the case for reading as a “technology for perspective-taking” that has the capacity to not only evoke people’s empathy but also expand it.

While this may sound trite, it was actually a seismic innovation for people in the pre-industrial age who didn’t see, hear or interact with those outside of their village.

Empathy technologies expand our access to diverse literature, allow us to more deeply understand each other and create opportunities for meaningful collaboration across racial, cultural, geographic and class backgrounds.

Teachers who are on the front lines of this growing diversity consider it their job to help students and employees become better perspective-takers.

In the rich depth of literature, we empathize with the protagonist, and when their flaws are inevitably revealed, we are humbled and see ourselves in their complex, imperfect lives.

Research has since proven that those who read more literary fiction are better at detecting and understanding others’ emotions.