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Oliver Dyer 2020-10-26
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The Defense Innovation Board recommends continuing remote work beyond the pandemic, at home and in a nationwide network of coworking spaces
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Scott Siebenaler 2016-07-27
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The government is sick of people thinking it is old and lumbering and bogged down in bureaucracy.

Sure, it is all those things.

This is particularly true of Department of Defense boss Ash Carter, who is trying to lure the Valley with promises of lucrative contracts.

And yesterday, the DoD dropped news that it s expanding the so-called Defense Innovation Advisory Board it established in March.

Joining the list are big names like Amazon s Jeff Bezos and the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, scientists and technologically disruptive types meant to help bring the DoD into the 21st century.

In fact, members of the board will have no part in military operations.

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0
Irene Diaz 2017-01-09
img

The environment may have just found a new ally — the Department of Defense.

While you may not think of firearms as particularly life producing devices, the DoD is hoping that could soon change.

Late last year, the government agency sent out a call for proposals looking for biodegradable bullets that contain seeds.

That s right — the trees of the future could come from guns.

As per the request, Currently the U.S. Army manufactures and consumes hundreds of thousands of training rounds.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of these rounds can take hundreds of years or more to degrade, which, needless to say, is no good for the environment.

collect
0
William Mulcahy 2021-07-07
img
Microsoft said it understood and respected the decision to drop the contract because the Defense Department would have faced a prolonged court battle
collect
0
Elizabeth Tinnin 2021-04-20
img
It might be time to consider adopting a formal Definition of Done

Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.
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0
Ganesh Kumar 2021-10-29
img

According to ChemAnalyst report, “Global Biodiesel Market: Plant Capacity, Production, Operating Efficiency, Demand & Supply, Technology, End Use, Distribution Channel, Region, Competition, Trade, Customer & Price Intelligence Market Analysis, 2015-2030”, global biodiesel market demand stood at 25 Million Tonnes in 2020 and is forecast to reach 48.02 Million Tonnes by 2030, growing at a healthy CAGR of 6.75% until 2030.

Lower performance as compared to fossil fuel and corrosion related problems are expected to hinder demand growth during the forecast period.Biodiesel is a type of fuel made from bio-based resources such as vegetable oil and animal fat.

It can be used in existing diesel engines without modification.

Biodiesel is produced via transesterification whereby glycerin is separated from animal fat or vegetable oil leaving behind methyl esters and glycerin.

Various automotive companies are incentivizing the usage of biofuel by giving extended warranty.

Indian government has set targets of 5% blending by 2022 and United States department of defense has ordered that most of its road fleet would use blended fuels.Read Full Report Here: https://www.chemanalyst.com/industry-report/biodiesel-market-570Biodiesel is basically processed vegetable oil or animal fat.

collect
0
Joseph Cormier 2018-10-15
img

Travel details for thousands of citizens slip into hands of slippery scumbags

According to anonymous sources at the Pentagon in Washington DC, an unnamed individual was able to access department travel records earlier this year, and would have been able to log employees' submitted personal information – such as names, dates of birth, and credit card numbers.

A US military spokesperson was not available to confirm or comment on the claims.

Both military and civilian workers are believed to have been caught up in the theft, and current estimates sit at roughly 30,000 people having their records exposed to miscreants, with that number set to climb as the investigation continues.

The data theft is said to have occurred not within the Pentagon itself, but rather with a third-party vendor it uses to book travel.

The vendor was not identified.

collect
0
Michael Ambriz 2017-01-10
img

If there s one thing more terrifying than conventional military drones, it s a swarm of tiny military drones which share a distributed brain.

The US Department of Defense has released footage above that shows three fighter jets releasing 103 Perdix drones in a test over California last October.

Each of the units has a wingspan of just 30cm and they re believed to be designed to dodge air defence systems in order to gather intelligence.

William Roper, director of the Strategic Capabilities Office, told the BBC: Because every Perdix communicates and collaborates with every other Perdix, the swarm has no leader and can gracefully adapt to drones entering or exiting the team.

The Americans aren t the only government developing the technology.

Last year the Chinese showed off their own swarm of larger, fixed-wing drones.

collect
0
George Comer 2017-01-10
img

The Department of Defense is testing low-cost, autonomous, micro-drones for low-altitude intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions.

The drones, dubbed Perdix, operate as a swarm and are not individually pre-programmed.

Instead, they act as a collective organism with one distributed brain for decision-making, the DOD said in a statement on Monday.

Because every Perdix communicates and collaborates with every other Perdix, the swarm has no leader and can gracefully adapt to drones entering or exiting the team, says William Roper, director of the Strategic Capabilities Office of the DOD.

The drones are meant to be controlled in much the same manner as a coach would guide a sports team.

The operator orders a broad objective, and the drones communally decide how best to execute the plan.

collect
0
Anthony Couture 2018-07-10
img

Figuring out what information should be classified and controlling access to it has been an eternal headache for defense and national security organizations—a headache that got a lot of attention during the investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's use of personal emails.

So the Department of Defense is looking for some help from machine-learning systems.

The DOD has issued a request for information (RFI) from industry in a quest for technology that will prevent the mislabeling and accidental (or deliberate) access and sharing of sensitive documents and data.

In an announcement posted in May by the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), the Pentagon stated that the DOD CIO's office—part of the Office of the Secretary of Defense—is "investigating the use of commercial solutions for labeling and controlling access to sensitive information."

Defense IT officials are seeking software that "must be able to make real-time decisions about the classification level of the information and an individual's ability to access, change, delete, receive, or forward the information based on the credentials of the sending and/or receiving individual, facility, and system."

In a response to questions regarding the RFI issued in late June, DOD officials said that the system should be able to ideally protect "any file type on a Microsoft operating system (OS) file system and active directory domain."

collect
0
Carlos Marier 2017-01-12
img

The Department of Defense has released video of a test of swarming drones conducted in the skies over the US Navy's test range at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake in California.

In the October test, in collaboration with the Naval Air Systems Command, three FA-18 Hornet aircraft dispersed 104 Perdix micro-drones from onboard flare dispensers.

The drones then communicated with each other, swarmed, and performed a series of designated "missions"—including finally swarming in a circle around a designated point on the ground.

collect
0
Jeffrey Baldwin 2018-07-11
img

The US Department of Defense is exploring how AI might be able to help it automatically label secretive information and control who gets access to it.

“To continue to securely create, access, process, manipulate, and monitor information, DoD CIO has the need to identify potential sources that can provide a commercial offthe-shelf/Government Off-the-shelf to implement discretionary access controls on top of the currently established mandatory access controls,” it said.

A sneak peak into the request for information filed back in May, and the recent responses gives hints at how such a system would work.

It’s a tricky decision when determining how sensitive information really is and how it should be classified, and it’s something machines can’t quite do yet considering they have no real understanding of text.

So, it still up to government employees to mark reports and documents under specific labels according to internal rules.

Machine learning, however, can help build the necessary tools for that as well as monitor and create automatic logs of who has accessed files, where its being accessed from, what system was used to access it, and if any changes were made.

collect
0
Edmond Mccolpin 2021-05-13
img
Xiaomi, a Beijing-based company known for its value-for-money smartphones and smart devices, was added to a Defense Department blacklist in January this year
collect
0
Jorge Medina 2017-03-15
img

Details of more than 33 million US employees - including military staff - have been released online, according to a security researcher.

The database is reported to contain information on 100,000 US Department of Defense employees, among others.

Troy Hunt, who published news of the leak, said the information had "enormous" potential for scammers.

Business services firm Dun & Bradstreet confirmed to tech news site ZDNet that it owns the data.

Information on government departments and private sector employees is commonly collated by business services that sell the data to other companies, such as marketing firms.

In this case, the records - including names, job titles and contact details - were originally compiled by NetProspex, which was acquired by Dun & Bradstreet in 2015.

collect
0
Laurence Lafarge 2021-03-05
img
The supply disruption concerns have arisen after the Biden administration announced plans to use the Defense Production Act to boost supplies needed to make Pfizer Inc.’s vaccines
collect
0
Ralph Philbrick 2019-03-06
img

On 12 October 2017, a 20-metre asteroid passed just 50,000 kilometres (31,000 miles) from Earth.

This asteroid had been discovered five years before, and the astronomers knew that it wasn’t actually a threat to Earth.

But they used the flyby as an important exercise to test astronomers’ ability to quickly coordinate a worldwide observation campaign.

Scientists and legislators have grown increasingly concerned about the threat of near-Earth objects, thanks to high-profile meteorite impacts and the realisation that many countries are unprepared for a sudden asteroid threat.

“In the [US] Department of Defense, they do so-called ‘war games,’” Vishnu Reddy, associate professor at the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory who devised the test, told Gizmodo.

“So why don’t we play pretend to test out the entire system, too?”

collect
0
Oliver Dyer 2020-10-26
img
The Defense Innovation Board recommends continuing remote work beyond the pandemic, at home and in a nationwide network of coworking spaces
Irene Diaz 2017-01-09
img

The environment may have just found a new ally — the Department of Defense.

While you may not think of firearms as particularly life producing devices, the DoD is hoping that could soon change.

Late last year, the government agency sent out a call for proposals looking for biodegradable bullets that contain seeds.

That s right — the trees of the future could come from guns.

As per the request, Currently the U.S. Army manufactures and consumes hundreds of thousands of training rounds.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of these rounds can take hundreds of years or more to degrade, which, needless to say, is no good for the environment.

Elizabeth Tinnin 2021-04-20
img
It might be time to consider adopting a formal Definition of Done

Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.
Joseph Cormier 2018-10-15
img

Travel details for thousands of citizens slip into hands of slippery scumbags

According to anonymous sources at the Pentagon in Washington DC, an unnamed individual was able to access department travel records earlier this year, and would have been able to log employees' submitted personal information – such as names, dates of birth, and credit card numbers.

A US military spokesperson was not available to confirm or comment on the claims.

Both military and civilian workers are believed to have been caught up in the theft, and current estimates sit at roughly 30,000 people having their records exposed to miscreants, with that number set to climb as the investigation continues.

The data theft is said to have occurred not within the Pentagon itself, but rather with a third-party vendor it uses to book travel.

The vendor was not identified.

George Comer 2017-01-10
img

The Department of Defense is testing low-cost, autonomous, micro-drones for low-altitude intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions.

The drones, dubbed Perdix, operate as a swarm and are not individually pre-programmed.

Instead, they act as a collective organism with one distributed brain for decision-making, the DOD said in a statement on Monday.

Because every Perdix communicates and collaborates with every other Perdix, the swarm has no leader and can gracefully adapt to drones entering or exiting the team, says William Roper, director of the Strategic Capabilities Office of the DOD.

The drones are meant to be controlled in much the same manner as a coach would guide a sports team.

The operator orders a broad objective, and the drones communally decide how best to execute the plan.

Carlos Marier 2017-01-12
img

The Department of Defense has released video of a test of swarming drones conducted in the skies over the US Navy's test range at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake in California.

In the October test, in collaboration with the Naval Air Systems Command, three FA-18 Hornet aircraft dispersed 104 Perdix micro-drones from onboard flare dispensers.

The drones then communicated with each other, swarmed, and performed a series of designated "missions"—including finally swarming in a circle around a designated point on the ground.

Edmond Mccolpin 2021-05-13
img
Xiaomi, a Beijing-based company known for its value-for-money smartphones and smart devices, was added to a Defense Department blacklist in January this year
Laurence Lafarge 2021-03-05
img
The supply disruption concerns have arisen after the Biden administration announced plans to use the Defense Production Act to boost supplies needed to make Pfizer Inc.’s vaccines
Scott Siebenaler 2016-07-27
img

The government is sick of people thinking it is old and lumbering and bogged down in bureaucracy.

Sure, it is all those things.

This is particularly true of Department of Defense boss Ash Carter, who is trying to lure the Valley with promises of lucrative contracts.

And yesterday, the DoD dropped news that it s expanding the so-called Defense Innovation Advisory Board it established in March.

Joining the list are big names like Amazon s Jeff Bezos and the astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, scientists and technologically disruptive types meant to help bring the DoD into the 21st century.

In fact, members of the board will have no part in military operations.

William Mulcahy 2021-07-07
img
Microsoft said it understood and respected the decision to drop the contract because the Defense Department would have faced a prolonged court battle
Ganesh Kumar 2021-10-29
img

According to ChemAnalyst report, “Global Biodiesel Market: Plant Capacity, Production, Operating Efficiency, Demand & Supply, Technology, End Use, Distribution Channel, Region, Competition, Trade, Customer & Price Intelligence Market Analysis, 2015-2030”, global biodiesel market demand stood at 25 Million Tonnes in 2020 and is forecast to reach 48.02 Million Tonnes by 2030, growing at a healthy CAGR of 6.75% until 2030.

Lower performance as compared to fossil fuel and corrosion related problems are expected to hinder demand growth during the forecast period.Biodiesel is a type of fuel made from bio-based resources such as vegetable oil and animal fat.

It can be used in existing diesel engines without modification.

Biodiesel is produced via transesterification whereby glycerin is separated from animal fat or vegetable oil leaving behind methyl esters and glycerin.

Various automotive companies are incentivizing the usage of biofuel by giving extended warranty.

Indian government has set targets of 5% blending by 2022 and United States department of defense has ordered that most of its road fleet would use blended fuels.Read Full Report Here: https://www.chemanalyst.com/industry-report/biodiesel-market-570Biodiesel is basically processed vegetable oil or animal fat.

Michael Ambriz 2017-01-10
img

If there s one thing more terrifying than conventional military drones, it s a swarm of tiny military drones which share a distributed brain.

The US Department of Defense has released footage above that shows three fighter jets releasing 103 Perdix drones in a test over California last October.

Each of the units has a wingspan of just 30cm and they re believed to be designed to dodge air defence systems in order to gather intelligence.

William Roper, director of the Strategic Capabilities Office, told the BBC: Because every Perdix communicates and collaborates with every other Perdix, the swarm has no leader and can gracefully adapt to drones entering or exiting the team.

The Americans aren t the only government developing the technology.

Last year the Chinese showed off their own swarm of larger, fixed-wing drones.

Anthony Couture 2018-07-10
img

Figuring out what information should be classified and controlling access to it has been an eternal headache for defense and national security organizations—a headache that got a lot of attention during the investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's use of personal emails.

So the Department of Defense is looking for some help from machine-learning systems.

The DOD has issued a request for information (RFI) from industry in a quest for technology that will prevent the mislabeling and accidental (or deliberate) access and sharing of sensitive documents and data.

In an announcement posted in May by the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), the Pentagon stated that the DOD CIO's office—part of the Office of the Secretary of Defense—is "investigating the use of commercial solutions for labeling and controlling access to sensitive information."

Defense IT officials are seeking software that "must be able to make real-time decisions about the classification level of the information and an individual's ability to access, change, delete, receive, or forward the information based on the credentials of the sending and/or receiving individual, facility, and system."

In a response to questions regarding the RFI issued in late June, DOD officials said that the system should be able to ideally protect "any file type on a Microsoft operating system (OS) file system and active directory domain."

Jeffrey Baldwin 2018-07-11
img

The US Department of Defense is exploring how AI might be able to help it automatically label secretive information and control who gets access to it.

“To continue to securely create, access, process, manipulate, and monitor information, DoD CIO has the need to identify potential sources that can provide a commercial offthe-shelf/Government Off-the-shelf to implement discretionary access controls on top of the currently established mandatory access controls,” it said.

A sneak peak into the request for information filed back in May, and the recent responses gives hints at how such a system would work.

It’s a tricky decision when determining how sensitive information really is and how it should be classified, and it’s something machines can’t quite do yet considering they have no real understanding of text.

So, it still up to government employees to mark reports and documents under specific labels according to internal rules.

Machine learning, however, can help build the necessary tools for that as well as monitor and create automatic logs of who has accessed files, where its being accessed from, what system was used to access it, and if any changes were made.

Jorge Medina 2017-03-15
img

Details of more than 33 million US employees - including military staff - have been released online, according to a security researcher.

The database is reported to contain information on 100,000 US Department of Defense employees, among others.

Troy Hunt, who published news of the leak, said the information had "enormous" potential for scammers.

Business services firm Dun & Bradstreet confirmed to tech news site ZDNet that it owns the data.

Information on government departments and private sector employees is commonly collated by business services that sell the data to other companies, such as marketing firms.

In this case, the records - including names, job titles and contact details - were originally compiled by NetProspex, which was acquired by Dun & Bradstreet in 2015.

Ralph Philbrick 2019-03-06
img

On 12 October 2017, a 20-metre asteroid passed just 50,000 kilometres (31,000 miles) from Earth.

This asteroid had been discovered five years before, and the astronomers knew that it wasn’t actually a threat to Earth.

But they used the flyby as an important exercise to test astronomers’ ability to quickly coordinate a worldwide observation campaign.

Scientists and legislators have grown increasingly concerned about the threat of near-Earth objects, thanks to high-profile meteorite impacts and the realisation that many countries are unprepared for a sudden asteroid threat.

“In the [US] Department of Defense, they do so-called ‘war games,’” Vishnu Reddy, associate professor at the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory who devised the test, told Gizmodo.

“So why don’t we play pretend to test out the entire system, too?”