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Phillip Willis 2016-08-02

Supercomputer maker Cray Inc. CRAY -0.92 % s plans for the year on Tuesday went up in smoke—literally, to a large extent—as smoke damage at a manufacturing facility helped cause the company to sharply cut back its revenue forecasts.

The Seattle-based company s stock plunged 20% in after-hours trading.

Cray said it expects to book just $80 million in revenue for the third quarter—compared with analyst estimates of $134 million—and $650 million for the year, well below the $795 million Wall Street analysts had projected.

The company is known for room-size systems that national laboratories and other customers use for chores such as weapons research, climate forecasting and product simulation.

These systems typically have large price tags, leading to frequent sizable swings in the company s quarterly revenues and profits.

The company on Tuesday cited damage caused by smoke emitted by malfunctioning equipment recently in one of its two factories in Chippewa Falls, Wis. Cray will have to replace all of the chips inside five completed supercomputers that were undergoing tests there, said Peter Ungaro, Cray s chief executive.

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0
Brandon Gaither 2016-12-03
img

The International Space Station fills several roles for NASA—providing a toehold in outer space for human activity, testing closed-loop technologies for long-duration spaceflight, and developing international partnerships.

But perhaps the station's biggest selling point is science.

It was, after all, designated a national laboratory in 2005.

Yet despite the vastly increased diversity of the astronaut corps since the early, macho days of the Mercury 7, many astronauts today are still fighter pilots, engineers, and surgeons.

But Kate Rubins is, and she spent 115 days on the space station this summer and fall.

Before becoming an astronaut, Rubins trained in molecular biology and led a laboratory of more than a dozen researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

collect
0
Ronnie Allen 2018-09-04
img

ORNL researchers used a specialized environmental chamber to characterize panels containing foam-encapsulated MAI cores and exposed them to outdoor weatherization tests via real building applications.

Laboratory experiments verified the panels' thermal resistance to heat flow to be at least twice that of current building insulation materials made of plastic foams, cellulose or fiberglass.

"Buildings consume 40 percent of the nation's energy and about 20 percent of the buildings' portion is due to heat gains or losses through the building enclosure," said ORNL's Kaushik Biswas, lead coauthor of the study.

The team's results were published in the journal Applied Energy.

[Contact: Jennifer Burke, (865) 576-3212; [email protected]]

Caption: ORNL researcher Kaushik Biswas analyzes the thermal performance of a two-by-two foot composite panel covered with smaller MAI panels separated by foam insulation.

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0
Anthony Breedlove 2018-06-21
img

Telltale elements offer clues to bomb building on the sly

AI can detect signs of nuclear weapons testing banned under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, according to research from the US Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

A group of scientists have built a neural network to sniff out any unusual nuclear activity.

Researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), one of the United States Department of Energy national laboratories, decided to see if they could use deep learning to sort through the different nuclear decay events to identify any suspicious behavior.

The lab, buried beneath 81 feet of concrete, rock and earth, is blocked out from energy from cosmic rays, electronics and other sources.

It means that the data collected is less noisy, making it easier to pinpoint unusual activity.

collect
0
Anthony Couture 2017-09-28
img

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., September 28, 2017--Four Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have been named 2017 Fellows: Donald Burton, Stephen Doorn, Manvendra Dubey, and Turab Lookman.

"Becoming a Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow is one of the highest accomplishments in the Lab," said Laboratory Director Charles McMillan.

"Each of these scientists has demonstrated sustained high-level achievement in programs of importance to the Laboratory and are recognized authorities in their fields.

They have made significant contributions to both Los Alamos and the broader scientific community."

His codes have been central to the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program since its inception and have enormously impacted both the nation's nuclear stockpile stewardship program and the broader scientific community.

Burton is the leading inventor for the conservative Lagrangian methods in shock wave compression of condensed matter, has written more than 200 papers and reports, and has served as a mentor to numerous students and postdoctoral researchers.

collect
0
Jeffrey Zambrana 2018-05-01
img

-- Scientists at two major national laboratories have demonstrated a new method for testing explosives stored in weapons stockpiles, a step they say will help reduce accidental detonation and ensure the weapons perform as expected.

Stored small-scale and large-scale explosives, from blasting caps to nuclear weapons, need to be tested regularly for safety, whether those weapons are stored for five years or stockpiled for 30 or more years.

When subjected to extreme environmental conditions such as temperatures above 65 degrees Celsius or below negative 20 degrees Celsius, they can become prone to accidental detonation.

She and a team of ARL researchers developed a technique for measuring the energy release from small quantities of explosive material by focusing a high-power laser pulse lasting a few nanoseconds (one billionth of a second) on the surface of the explosive.

By measuring the speed of the shock wave, the energy release from the explosive can be determined.

This technique was recently used to test an explosive formulation of interest to researchers at Sandia National Laboratories who study the properties of aged-energetic materials.

collect
0
Richard Lee 2018-08-21
img

The research conducted at the country's National Laboratories is usually highly classified and specifically aimed at solving national security problems.

That's the case here, as a startup called WaveSense looks to apply technology originally developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory to detect buried mines and improvised explosive devices for use in self-driving cars.

If you want a car to drive itself, it has to know where it is in the world to a pretty high degree of accuracy.

Until now, just about every variation of autonomous vehicle we've come across has done that through a combination of highly accurate GPS, an HD map, and some kind of sensor to detect the environment around it.

Actually, you want more than one kind of sensor, because redundancy is going to be critical if humans are going to trust their lives to robot vehicles.

Other solutions have included far infrared, which works by detecting emitted light, but WaveSense's approach is truly photon-independent.

collect
0
Ronald Griffis 2018-10-02
img

The Virgin Atlantic Airlines' flight from Orlando to London using a Boeing 747 will usher in a new era for low-carbon aviation that has been years in the making.

Through a combination of chemistry, biotechnology, engineering and catalysis, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its industrial partner LanzaTech have shown the world that carbon can be recycled and used for commercial flight.

LanzaTech, a Chicago-based company, developed a unique carbon recycling technology that operates similar to traditional fermentation but instead of using sugars and yeast to make alcohol, waste carbon-rich gases, such as those found at industrial manufacturing sites, are converted by bacteria to fuels and chemicals, such as ethanol.

The catalyst removes oxygen from the ethanol in the form of water, and then combines the remaining hydrocarbon molecules to form chains large enough for jet fuel without forming aromatics that lead to soot when burned.

DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office has been instrumental in supporting the technology development.

LanzaTech's Freedom Pines site is the location of a planned facility which would be able to convert sustainable ethanol to millions of gallons per year of low carbon jet and diesel fuels.

collect
0
Richard Lee 2017-03-16

From 1945 to 1962, the United States conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests.

While these tests were kept secret at the time, the experiments were recorded on film and locked away in hidden vaults.

Over the years, these films have been slowly decomposing, and since they're made from organic material, attempts to preserve them only work for a certain period of time.

A total of 35.6 megatons were shot during this period.

The majority of tests in this series (29) were airdrops, and a series of high-altitude tests, known as Operation Fishbowl, involved Thor missiles launching warheads at altitudes of up to 248 miles.

After witnessing the first nuclear detonation test at the Trinity site on July 16, 1945, Robert Oppenheimer spoke the infamous lines: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds”.

collect
0
Charles Janow 2018-07-19
img

"Because nuclear energy is such a vital part of our nation's energy portfolio, these investments are necessary to ensuring that future generations of Americans will continue to benefit from safe, clean, reliable, and resilient nuclear energy," said Ed McGinnis, DOE's principal deputy assistant secretary for nuclear energy.

The award is part of the DOE's Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP), which aims to maintain U.S. leadership in nuclear research across the country by providing top science and engineering faculty and their students opportunities to develop innovative technologies and solutions for civil nuclear capabilities.

As a result of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011, new safety upgrades for existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are being developed, which include Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) and diverse and flexible coping strategies (FLEX).

The Rensselaer project, titled "Coping Time and Cost Analysis of Accident Tolerant Plant Design Based on Dynamic PRA Methodology," is aimed at the systematic operation strategy development based on dynamic response analysis in consideration of FLEX and ATF upgrades of nuclear power plants.

Hyun Gook Kang, associate professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is the principal investigator.

Collaborators include Tunc Aldemir, Ohio State University; Youhoo Lee, University of New Mexico; and Jin Kyun Park, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

collect
0
Stuart Smith 2018-09-30
img

The panicked screams behind me showed just how terrified two other reporters were as the Demogorgon popped out of a hidden opening at Netflix's Stranger Things haunted house.

Given that it was the fifth and final stop in our press tour of Universal Studios Singapore's annual Halloween Horror Nights event, I'd figured they should've been numbed to the tricks by now.

As we passed into the Upside Down, the ladies got to screaming, no thanks to the Demogorgon popping up from behind some trees, giving them yet another possible heart attack.

From the faithfully re-created Byers home to Hawkins National Laboratory, the Stranger Things house offered everything a fan could want, including a re-creation of the first season's opening scenes.

The journey through the house was short, especially when compared with the other four spook houses on offer at the theme park.

We'd already crept our way through those, and they were a lot more suspenseful and scary, particularly if you're into Asian horror mythology.

collect
0
Elizabeth Tinnin 2018-06-25
img

Today, U.S. supercomputer advocates are cheering, because for the first time since 2012, a U.S. supercomputer—Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s newly installed Summit supercomputer—has been ranked 1 in performance, capturing the world crown back from China in the twice-yearly TOP500 assessment of supercomputers, which was announced at the ISC High Performance conference in Frankfurt.

The top five positions, ranked using the traditional HPC (LINPACK) benchmark, went like this:

TOP500 Ranking of June 2018

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S.A.

National Supercomputing Center in Wuxi, China

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, U.S.A.

collect
0
Rodney Edson 2018-09-16
img

Last week, the House passed a bipartisan bill that originated in the Senate called the Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act (S. 97), which will allow the private sector to partner with US National Laboratories to vet advanced nuclear technologies.

The bill also directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to lay the ground work for establishing "a versatile, reactor-based fast neutron source."

The Senate also introduced a second bill called the Nuclear Energy Leadership Act (S. 3422) last Thursday, which would direct the DOE actually establish that fast neutron reactor.

That bill also directs the DOE to "make available high-assay, low-enriched uranium" for research purposes.

The Nuclear Energy Leadership Act has not yet made it past a Senate vote.

That bill passed the House but seems to have died in the Senate.

collect
0
Phillip Willis 2016-08-02

Supercomputer maker Cray Inc. CRAY -0.92 % s plans for the year on Tuesday went up in smoke—literally, to a large extent—as smoke damage at a manufacturing facility helped cause the company to sharply cut back its revenue forecasts.

The Seattle-based company s stock plunged 20% in after-hours trading.

Cray said it expects to book just $80 million in revenue for the third quarter—compared with analyst estimates of $134 million—and $650 million for the year, well below the $795 million Wall Street analysts had projected.

The company is known for room-size systems that national laboratories and other customers use for chores such as weapons research, climate forecasting and product simulation.

These systems typically have large price tags, leading to frequent sizable swings in the company s quarterly revenues and profits.

The company on Tuesday cited damage caused by smoke emitted by malfunctioning equipment recently in one of its two factories in Chippewa Falls, Wis. Cray will have to replace all of the chips inside five completed supercomputers that were undergoing tests there, said Peter Ungaro, Cray s chief executive.

Ronnie Allen 2018-09-04
img

ORNL researchers used a specialized environmental chamber to characterize panels containing foam-encapsulated MAI cores and exposed them to outdoor weatherization tests via real building applications.

Laboratory experiments verified the panels' thermal resistance to heat flow to be at least twice that of current building insulation materials made of plastic foams, cellulose or fiberglass.

"Buildings consume 40 percent of the nation's energy and about 20 percent of the buildings' portion is due to heat gains or losses through the building enclosure," said ORNL's Kaushik Biswas, lead coauthor of the study.

The team's results were published in the journal Applied Energy.

[Contact: Jennifer Burke, (865) 576-3212; [email protected]]

Caption: ORNL researcher Kaushik Biswas analyzes the thermal performance of a two-by-two foot composite panel covered with smaller MAI panels separated by foam insulation.

Anthony Couture 2017-09-28
img

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., September 28, 2017--Four Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have been named 2017 Fellows: Donald Burton, Stephen Doorn, Manvendra Dubey, and Turab Lookman.

"Becoming a Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow is one of the highest accomplishments in the Lab," said Laboratory Director Charles McMillan.

"Each of these scientists has demonstrated sustained high-level achievement in programs of importance to the Laboratory and are recognized authorities in their fields.

They have made significant contributions to both Los Alamos and the broader scientific community."

His codes have been central to the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program since its inception and have enormously impacted both the nation's nuclear stockpile stewardship program and the broader scientific community.

Burton is the leading inventor for the conservative Lagrangian methods in shock wave compression of condensed matter, has written more than 200 papers and reports, and has served as a mentor to numerous students and postdoctoral researchers.

Richard Lee 2018-08-21
img

The research conducted at the country's National Laboratories is usually highly classified and specifically aimed at solving national security problems.

That's the case here, as a startup called WaveSense looks to apply technology originally developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory to detect buried mines and improvised explosive devices for use in self-driving cars.

If you want a car to drive itself, it has to know where it is in the world to a pretty high degree of accuracy.

Until now, just about every variation of autonomous vehicle we've come across has done that through a combination of highly accurate GPS, an HD map, and some kind of sensor to detect the environment around it.

Actually, you want more than one kind of sensor, because redundancy is going to be critical if humans are going to trust their lives to robot vehicles.

Other solutions have included far infrared, which works by detecting emitted light, but WaveSense's approach is truly photon-independent.

Richard Lee 2017-03-16

From 1945 to 1962, the United States conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests.

While these tests were kept secret at the time, the experiments were recorded on film and locked away in hidden vaults.

Over the years, these films have been slowly decomposing, and since they're made from organic material, attempts to preserve them only work for a certain period of time.

A total of 35.6 megatons were shot during this period.

The majority of tests in this series (29) were airdrops, and a series of high-altitude tests, known as Operation Fishbowl, involved Thor missiles launching warheads at altitudes of up to 248 miles.

After witnessing the first nuclear detonation test at the Trinity site on July 16, 1945, Robert Oppenheimer spoke the infamous lines: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds”.

Stuart Smith 2018-09-30
img

The panicked screams behind me showed just how terrified two other reporters were as the Demogorgon popped out of a hidden opening at Netflix's Stranger Things haunted house.

Given that it was the fifth and final stop in our press tour of Universal Studios Singapore's annual Halloween Horror Nights event, I'd figured they should've been numbed to the tricks by now.

As we passed into the Upside Down, the ladies got to screaming, no thanks to the Demogorgon popping up from behind some trees, giving them yet another possible heart attack.

From the faithfully re-created Byers home to Hawkins National Laboratory, the Stranger Things house offered everything a fan could want, including a re-creation of the first season's opening scenes.

The journey through the house was short, especially when compared with the other four spook houses on offer at the theme park.

We'd already crept our way through those, and they were a lot more suspenseful and scary, particularly if you're into Asian horror mythology.

Rodney Edson 2018-09-16
img

Last week, the House passed a bipartisan bill that originated in the Senate called the Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act (S. 97), which will allow the private sector to partner with US National Laboratories to vet advanced nuclear technologies.

The bill also directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to lay the ground work for establishing "a versatile, reactor-based fast neutron source."

The Senate also introduced a second bill called the Nuclear Energy Leadership Act (S. 3422) last Thursday, which would direct the DOE actually establish that fast neutron reactor.

That bill also directs the DOE to "make available high-assay, low-enriched uranium" for research purposes.

The Nuclear Energy Leadership Act has not yet made it past a Senate vote.

That bill passed the House but seems to have died in the Senate.

Brandon Gaither 2016-12-03
img

The International Space Station fills several roles for NASA—providing a toehold in outer space for human activity, testing closed-loop technologies for long-duration spaceflight, and developing international partnerships.

But perhaps the station's biggest selling point is science.

It was, after all, designated a national laboratory in 2005.

Yet despite the vastly increased diversity of the astronaut corps since the early, macho days of the Mercury 7, many astronauts today are still fighter pilots, engineers, and surgeons.

But Kate Rubins is, and she spent 115 days on the space station this summer and fall.

Before becoming an astronaut, Rubins trained in molecular biology and led a laboratory of more than a dozen researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Anthony Breedlove 2018-06-21
img

Telltale elements offer clues to bomb building on the sly

AI can detect signs of nuclear weapons testing banned under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, according to research from the US Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

A group of scientists have built a neural network to sniff out any unusual nuclear activity.

Researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), one of the United States Department of Energy national laboratories, decided to see if they could use deep learning to sort through the different nuclear decay events to identify any suspicious behavior.

The lab, buried beneath 81 feet of concrete, rock and earth, is blocked out from energy from cosmic rays, electronics and other sources.

It means that the data collected is less noisy, making it easier to pinpoint unusual activity.

Jeffrey Zambrana 2018-05-01
img

-- Scientists at two major national laboratories have demonstrated a new method for testing explosives stored in weapons stockpiles, a step they say will help reduce accidental detonation and ensure the weapons perform as expected.

Stored small-scale and large-scale explosives, from blasting caps to nuclear weapons, need to be tested regularly for safety, whether those weapons are stored for five years or stockpiled for 30 or more years.

When subjected to extreme environmental conditions such as temperatures above 65 degrees Celsius or below negative 20 degrees Celsius, they can become prone to accidental detonation.

She and a team of ARL researchers developed a technique for measuring the energy release from small quantities of explosive material by focusing a high-power laser pulse lasting a few nanoseconds (one billionth of a second) on the surface of the explosive.

By measuring the speed of the shock wave, the energy release from the explosive can be determined.

This technique was recently used to test an explosive formulation of interest to researchers at Sandia National Laboratories who study the properties of aged-energetic materials.

Ronald Griffis 2018-10-02
img

The Virgin Atlantic Airlines' flight from Orlando to London using a Boeing 747 will usher in a new era for low-carbon aviation that has been years in the making.

Through a combination of chemistry, biotechnology, engineering and catalysis, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its industrial partner LanzaTech have shown the world that carbon can be recycled and used for commercial flight.

LanzaTech, a Chicago-based company, developed a unique carbon recycling technology that operates similar to traditional fermentation but instead of using sugars and yeast to make alcohol, waste carbon-rich gases, such as those found at industrial manufacturing sites, are converted by bacteria to fuels and chemicals, such as ethanol.

The catalyst removes oxygen from the ethanol in the form of water, and then combines the remaining hydrocarbon molecules to form chains large enough for jet fuel without forming aromatics that lead to soot when burned.

DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office has been instrumental in supporting the technology development.

LanzaTech's Freedom Pines site is the location of a planned facility which would be able to convert sustainable ethanol to millions of gallons per year of low carbon jet and diesel fuels.

Charles Janow 2018-07-19
img

"Because nuclear energy is such a vital part of our nation's energy portfolio, these investments are necessary to ensuring that future generations of Americans will continue to benefit from safe, clean, reliable, and resilient nuclear energy," said Ed McGinnis, DOE's principal deputy assistant secretary for nuclear energy.

The award is part of the DOE's Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP), which aims to maintain U.S. leadership in nuclear research across the country by providing top science and engineering faculty and their students opportunities to develop innovative technologies and solutions for civil nuclear capabilities.

As a result of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011, new safety upgrades for existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) are being developed, which include Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) and diverse and flexible coping strategies (FLEX).

The Rensselaer project, titled "Coping Time and Cost Analysis of Accident Tolerant Plant Design Based on Dynamic PRA Methodology," is aimed at the systematic operation strategy development based on dynamic response analysis in consideration of FLEX and ATF upgrades of nuclear power plants.

Hyun Gook Kang, associate professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is the principal investigator.

Collaborators include Tunc Aldemir, Ohio State University; Youhoo Lee, University of New Mexico; and Jin Kyun Park, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

Elizabeth Tinnin 2018-06-25
img

Today, U.S. supercomputer advocates are cheering, because for the first time since 2012, a U.S. supercomputer—Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s newly installed Summit supercomputer—has been ranked 1 in performance, capturing the world crown back from China in the twice-yearly TOP500 assessment of supercomputers, which was announced at the ISC High Performance conference in Frankfurt.

The top five positions, ranked using the traditional HPC (LINPACK) benchmark, went like this:

TOP500 Ranking of June 2018

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S.A.

National Supercomputing Center in Wuxi, China

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, U.S.A.