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Marie Haines 2016-05-24
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The move comes nearly two weeks after a contentious committee hearing and as lawmakers learned that Hoggan had received $90,000 in bonuses despite security snafus and long lines at US airports.

TSA Administrator Peter Neffenger said, "These adjustments will enable more focused leadership and screening operations at critical airports in the national transportation system."

As passengers have been confronted by massive security lines at US airports, lawmakers found Hoggan had been awarded the bonus despite a Department of Homeland Security inspector general report highlighting pitiful security operations.

During the House Oversight Committee hearing May 12, Neffenger said that when he joined this organization last year, I found an organization with 5,800 fewer screeners and it had fewer front-line officers than it had four years previously.

Hoggan, TSA s security chief since May 2013, was replaced by his deputy, Darby LaJoye, who will serve on an interim basis.

The TSA expects a 4 percent increase in the number of passengers this summer, about 231 million flight travelers in all.

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0
Bryan White 2016-05-23
img

Earlier this month, Hoggan became the target of an ongoing congressional inquiry after the House Oversight Committee learned he received $90,000 in bonuses while airport security failed to improve.

According to TSA Administrator Peter Neffenger, Hoggan will be reassigned to new duties while Darby LaJoye takes over his role.

Neffenger and his boss, Homeland Security Jeh Johnson, promised that more than 300 extra TSA officers would be assigned to Chicago s airports by mid-August — 58 of them within the next three weeks — and that 100 more part-time workers in Chicago would be promoted to full time.

In addition to replacing Hoggan and hiring more officers, Neffenger announced the creation of a National Incident Command Center to better allocate department resources on the fly.

These adjustments will enable more focused leadership and screening operations at critical airports, wrote Neffenger.

Given how well the TSA currently operates, it might even be true.

collect
0
Marshall Johnson 2016-07-14
img

Postal reform moves forward in the House

The 2016 Postal Service Reform Act was unanimously backed this week by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Earlier attempts at reform have not received a vote in the House, and this measure mirrors a Senate bill which has languished without progress.

The bill, supported by both the Republican chairman and ranking Democratic members of the Committee Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Elijah Cummings, D-Md would reintroduce--but decrease--a temporary price increase which expired in April, and set the Postal Regulation Commission a 2018 target to review how postal pricing structure, taking into account customer and service considerations as well as economics.

It also makes new provisions for funding employees' retirement.

Opponents of the bill object to the increase in the postal rate.

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0
James Manzo 2018-12-10
img

Equifax didn't take steps to prevent the data breach that struck it in 2017, and it wasn't ready to handle the aftermath, either.

That's the takeaway from the House Oversight Committee's report, released Monday, which calls the breach "entirely preventable."

The 96-page report said Equifax lacked clear lines of authority in its IT department, which meant that important security measures weren't put in place when they should have been.

What's more, the company's collection of sensitive consumer information was spread out among out-of-date, custom-built system, the report said.

Finally, the report was especially critical of Equifax's former CEO Richard Smith, who, the report says, led a strategy of acquiring businesses that collect consumer data and amassing a huge trove of data without implementing a solid strategy to secure it.

"While the acquisition strategy was successful for Equifax's bottom line and stock price, this growth brought increasing complexity to Equifax's IT systems, and expanded data security risks," the report says.

collect
0
Eddie Waldo 2018-12-11
img

'Entirely preventable' theft down to traffic-monitoring certificate left expired for 19 months

A US Congressional report outlin]ing the breakdowns that lead to the 2017 theft of 148 million personal records from Equifax has revealed a stunning catalog of failure.

The 96-page report (PDF) from the Committee of Oversight and Government Reform found that the 2017 network breach could have easily been prevented had the company taken basic security precautions.

The report noted some of the previously-disclosed details of the hack, including the expired SSL certificate that had disabled its intrusion detection system for 19 months and the Apache Struts patch that went uninstalled for two months because of that bad cert.

The report states that Equifax's IT team did scan for unpatched Apache Struts code on its network.

But it only checked the root directory, not the subdirectory that was home to the unpatched software

collect
0
Mark Maynard 2016-08-24
img

A two-dose package cost around $94 nine years ago.

The average cost was more than six times that in May, according to the Elsevier Clinical Solutions' Gold Standard Drug Database.Sen.

Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, wrote Mylan, the company that manufactures the devices, and asked for more information on why the prices have increased.

He cited the cost to parents whose children need them and also to schools that keep the EpiPens on hand.

In this Friday, July 8, 2016 photo, a pharmacist holds a package of EpiPens, an epinephrine autoinjector for the treatment of allergic reactions, in Sacramento, Calif. Price hikes for the emergency medicine have made its maker, Mylan, the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug prices.

"The substantial price increase could limit access to a much-needed medication," Grassley wrote to Mylan Chief Executive Heather Bresch in an Aug. 22 letter.

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0
Adrian Bray 2017-02-17
img

Remember the unsecured Android handset that newly minted President Trump gave up, but then apparently didn t actually give up?

Things had seemingly gone silent on that front as the world took some time out to focus on the rest of the deluge of insanity that is politics in 2017.

Today, however, the story is rearing its head yet again, as California Congressman Ted Lieu has proposed an investigation into stories that reports that Trump is still using his unsecured Android headset an old Samsung Galaxy S3, apparently , executive security be damned.

Rep. Lieu has requested that the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hold an investigative hearing into the reports that the President is that the President is jeopardizing national security by egregiously failing to implement commonsense security measures across the board.

A press release tied to the letter also makes reference to reports about Trump talking nuclear strategy at a dinner table in Mar-a-Lago for good measure.

Lieu adds in the letter, Cybersecurity experts universally agree that an ordinary Android smartphone, which the President is reportedly using despite repeated warnings from the Secret Service, can be easily hacked, calling it an egregious affront to national security.

collect
0
Larry Johnson 2021-05-14
img
As part of the Postal Service Reform Act, the USPS would receive another $8 billion to help make the majority of new mail carriers electric.
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0
Steven Jones 2017-04-24
img

Pharmaceutical company Mylan sued West Virginia in 2015 to keep its EpiPens on the state’s “preferred drug list,” which, if successful, would mean that the state’s Medicaid programs would have to automatically pay for the pricey epinephrine auto-injectors.

The bold and unusual move by Mylan—which ultimately failed—is yet another example of the aggressive marketing and legal tactics the company used to boost profits from EpiPens, which halt life-threatening allergic reactions.

Since Mylan acquired rights to EpiPen in 2007, the company raised its price by more than 400 percent.

Mylan also allegedly made illegal deals with schools to undercut competitors and allegedly scammed federal and state regulators out of millions in rebates by knowingly misclassifying the device.

The company’s CEO, Heather Bresch, is one of the highest-paid CEOs in the industry, earning nearly $19 million annually.

But before public rage swelled, it seems states were quietly battling with the pharmaceutical giant.

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0
Emma Martin 2020-09-03
img
A leaked document from the agency warned that a "lack of time to research" could mean "serious errors discovered in the data may not be fixed."
collect
0
Robert Rock 2016-09-08
img

A new piece of evidence surfaced Wednesday night in the imbroglio over Hillary Clinton s controversial use of a private server and Blackberry during her time as Secretary of State: A friendly message from Colin Powell detailing how he had used his own unapproved devices and private email during his time as head of the State Department years earlier.

The evidence hardly excuses Clinton for her own mishandling of sensitive, sometimes-classified data that FBI director James Comey has called extremely careless, though not criminal.

Instead, it shows how heads of government agencies have flouted tech security rules for years, long before Clinton s email troubles became a heated campaign issue.

As anyone who has worked as an IT administrator knows: Powerful people do what they want with technology, even if it breaks security rules.

Shortly after she was sworn into office in 2009, Clinton emailed Powell, asking advice about how to keep using her Blackberry as secretary.

The email, which was dug up and released by House Oversight Committee leader Representative Elijah Cummings, doesn t reveal whether Powell ever used his private email setup to exchange classified documents, the worst offense of Clinton s IT misbehavior.

collect
0
Issac Pierce 2016-09-29
img

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 21: Mylan Inc. CEO Heather Bresch holds up a 2-pack of EpiPen as she testifies during a hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee September 21, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

The committee held a hearing on "Reviewing the Rising Price of EpiPens."

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Over the nine or so years that Mylan, Inc. has been selling—and hiking the price—of EpiPens, the drug company has been misclassifying the life-saving device and stiffing Medicaid out of full rebate payments, federal regulators told Ars.

Under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program, drug manufacturers, such as Mylan, can get their products covered by Medicaid if they agree to offer rebates to the government to offset costs.

With a brand-name drug such as the EpiPen, which currently has no generic versions and has patent protection, Mylan was supposed to classify the drug as a single source, or brand name drug.

collect
0
Eric Billiter 2021-01-14
img
Public officials "evaded accountability for far too long," prosecutor says.
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0
Henry Lawrence 2021-06-16
img
FBI Director Christopher Wray told the House Oversight Committee a huge effort is ongoing to find people who took part in the January 6 Capitol riot.
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0
William Jones 2016-09-26
img

Mylan Inc. CEO Heather Breschtestifies during a hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee September 21, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

The EpiPen profit figures that Heather Bresch, CEO of EpiPen maker Mylan, Inc., proudly displayed on a giant chart to the seething House Oversight and Government Reform Committee last week were misleading at best and a flat-out lie at worst, according to a filing to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Bresch, who was called before the committee to explain steep price hikes of the life-saving devices, insisted that the company only makes $100 profit per two-pack of EpiPens.

However, back in 2007, before Mylan bought the rights to the pens and raised the price 15 times, an EpiPen was priced at around just $50.

In her testimony, Bresch blamed the puzzlingly small profit on undefined costs and America s complicated healthcare system.

It turns out that the $100 profit figure was calculated by applying a 37.5 percent tax rate, which the company likely doesn t pay.

collect
0
William Hill 2016-12-19

WASHINGTON—A House committee has recommended Congress pass a new law to create national standards for how police officers and federal agents use powerful cellphone tracking technology in their investigations.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee staffers issued a bipartisan report Monday, the result of a yearlong probe launched after The Wall Street Journal and others wrote about how investigators were scanning innocent people s cellphones without search warrants to try to find criminals.

Such devices have a variety of brand names or nicknames, including dirtbox, Stingray and Hailstorm.

The Journal reported in 2014 that the U.S.

Marshals used such devices in small Cessna airplanes around the country to hunt for fugitives.

The Journal also reported the Marshals developed the technology with help from the Central Intelligence Agency.

collect
0
Marie Haines 2016-05-24
img

The move comes nearly two weeks after a contentious committee hearing and as lawmakers learned that Hoggan had received $90,000 in bonuses despite security snafus and long lines at US airports.

TSA Administrator Peter Neffenger said, "These adjustments will enable more focused leadership and screening operations at critical airports in the national transportation system."

As passengers have been confronted by massive security lines at US airports, lawmakers found Hoggan had been awarded the bonus despite a Department of Homeland Security inspector general report highlighting pitiful security operations.

During the House Oversight Committee hearing May 12, Neffenger said that when he joined this organization last year, I found an organization with 5,800 fewer screeners and it had fewer front-line officers than it had four years previously.

Hoggan, TSA s security chief since May 2013, was replaced by his deputy, Darby LaJoye, who will serve on an interim basis.

The TSA expects a 4 percent increase in the number of passengers this summer, about 231 million flight travelers in all.

Marshall Johnson 2016-07-14
img

Postal reform moves forward in the House

The 2016 Postal Service Reform Act was unanimously backed this week by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Earlier attempts at reform have not received a vote in the House, and this measure mirrors a Senate bill which has languished without progress.

The bill, supported by both the Republican chairman and ranking Democratic members of the Committee Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Elijah Cummings, D-Md would reintroduce--but decrease--a temporary price increase which expired in April, and set the Postal Regulation Commission a 2018 target to review how postal pricing structure, taking into account customer and service considerations as well as economics.

It also makes new provisions for funding employees' retirement.

Opponents of the bill object to the increase in the postal rate.

Eddie Waldo 2018-12-11
img

'Entirely preventable' theft down to traffic-monitoring certificate left expired for 19 months

A US Congressional report outlin]ing the breakdowns that lead to the 2017 theft of 148 million personal records from Equifax has revealed a stunning catalog of failure.

The 96-page report (PDF) from the Committee of Oversight and Government Reform found that the 2017 network breach could have easily been prevented had the company taken basic security precautions.

The report noted some of the previously-disclosed details of the hack, including the expired SSL certificate that had disabled its intrusion detection system for 19 months and the Apache Struts patch that went uninstalled for two months because of that bad cert.

The report states that Equifax's IT team did scan for unpatched Apache Struts code on its network.

But it only checked the root directory, not the subdirectory that was home to the unpatched software

Adrian Bray 2017-02-17
img

Remember the unsecured Android handset that newly minted President Trump gave up, but then apparently didn t actually give up?

Things had seemingly gone silent on that front as the world took some time out to focus on the rest of the deluge of insanity that is politics in 2017.

Today, however, the story is rearing its head yet again, as California Congressman Ted Lieu has proposed an investigation into stories that reports that Trump is still using his unsecured Android headset an old Samsung Galaxy S3, apparently , executive security be damned.

Rep. Lieu has requested that the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hold an investigative hearing into the reports that the President is that the President is jeopardizing national security by egregiously failing to implement commonsense security measures across the board.

A press release tied to the letter also makes reference to reports about Trump talking nuclear strategy at a dinner table in Mar-a-Lago for good measure.

Lieu adds in the letter, Cybersecurity experts universally agree that an ordinary Android smartphone, which the President is reportedly using despite repeated warnings from the Secret Service, can be easily hacked, calling it an egregious affront to national security.

Steven Jones 2017-04-24
img

Pharmaceutical company Mylan sued West Virginia in 2015 to keep its EpiPens on the state’s “preferred drug list,” which, if successful, would mean that the state’s Medicaid programs would have to automatically pay for the pricey epinephrine auto-injectors.

The bold and unusual move by Mylan—which ultimately failed—is yet another example of the aggressive marketing and legal tactics the company used to boost profits from EpiPens, which halt life-threatening allergic reactions.

Since Mylan acquired rights to EpiPen in 2007, the company raised its price by more than 400 percent.

Mylan also allegedly made illegal deals with schools to undercut competitors and allegedly scammed federal and state regulators out of millions in rebates by knowingly misclassifying the device.

The company’s CEO, Heather Bresch, is one of the highest-paid CEOs in the industry, earning nearly $19 million annually.

But before public rage swelled, it seems states were quietly battling with the pharmaceutical giant.

Robert Rock 2016-09-08
img

A new piece of evidence surfaced Wednesday night in the imbroglio over Hillary Clinton s controversial use of a private server and Blackberry during her time as Secretary of State: A friendly message from Colin Powell detailing how he had used his own unapproved devices and private email during his time as head of the State Department years earlier.

The evidence hardly excuses Clinton for her own mishandling of sensitive, sometimes-classified data that FBI director James Comey has called extremely careless, though not criminal.

Instead, it shows how heads of government agencies have flouted tech security rules for years, long before Clinton s email troubles became a heated campaign issue.

As anyone who has worked as an IT administrator knows: Powerful people do what they want with technology, even if it breaks security rules.

Shortly after she was sworn into office in 2009, Clinton emailed Powell, asking advice about how to keep using her Blackberry as secretary.

The email, which was dug up and released by House Oversight Committee leader Representative Elijah Cummings, doesn t reveal whether Powell ever used his private email setup to exchange classified documents, the worst offense of Clinton s IT misbehavior.

Eric Billiter 2021-01-14
img
Public officials "evaded accountability for far too long," prosecutor says.
William Jones 2016-09-26
img

Mylan Inc. CEO Heather Breschtestifies during a hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee September 21, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

The EpiPen profit figures that Heather Bresch, CEO of EpiPen maker Mylan, Inc., proudly displayed on a giant chart to the seething House Oversight and Government Reform Committee last week were misleading at best and a flat-out lie at worst, according to a filing to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Bresch, who was called before the committee to explain steep price hikes of the life-saving devices, insisted that the company only makes $100 profit per two-pack of EpiPens.

However, back in 2007, before Mylan bought the rights to the pens and raised the price 15 times, an EpiPen was priced at around just $50.

In her testimony, Bresch blamed the puzzlingly small profit on undefined costs and America s complicated healthcare system.

It turns out that the $100 profit figure was calculated by applying a 37.5 percent tax rate, which the company likely doesn t pay.

Bryan White 2016-05-23
img

Earlier this month, Hoggan became the target of an ongoing congressional inquiry after the House Oversight Committee learned he received $90,000 in bonuses while airport security failed to improve.

According to TSA Administrator Peter Neffenger, Hoggan will be reassigned to new duties while Darby LaJoye takes over his role.

Neffenger and his boss, Homeland Security Jeh Johnson, promised that more than 300 extra TSA officers would be assigned to Chicago s airports by mid-August — 58 of them within the next three weeks — and that 100 more part-time workers in Chicago would be promoted to full time.

In addition to replacing Hoggan and hiring more officers, Neffenger announced the creation of a National Incident Command Center to better allocate department resources on the fly.

These adjustments will enable more focused leadership and screening operations at critical airports, wrote Neffenger.

Given how well the TSA currently operates, it might even be true.

James Manzo 2018-12-10
img

Equifax didn't take steps to prevent the data breach that struck it in 2017, and it wasn't ready to handle the aftermath, either.

That's the takeaway from the House Oversight Committee's report, released Monday, which calls the breach "entirely preventable."

The 96-page report said Equifax lacked clear lines of authority in its IT department, which meant that important security measures weren't put in place when they should have been.

What's more, the company's collection of sensitive consumer information was spread out among out-of-date, custom-built system, the report said.

Finally, the report was especially critical of Equifax's former CEO Richard Smith, who, the report says, led a strategy of acquiring businesses that collect consumer data and amassing a huge trove of data without implementing a solid strategy to secure it.

"While the acquisition strategy was successful for Equifax's bottom line and stock price, this growth brought increasing complexity to Equifax's IT systems, and expanded data security risks," the report says.

Mark Maynard 2016-08-24
img

A two-dose package cost around $94 nine years ago.

The average cost was more than six times that in May, according to the Elsevier Clinical Solutions' Gold Standard Drug Database.Sen.

Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, wrote Mylan, the company that manufactures the devices, and asked for more information on why the prices have increased.

He cited the cost to parents whose children need them and also to schools that keep the EpiPens on hand.

In this Friday, July 8, 2016 photo, a pharmacist holds a package of EpiPens, an epinephrine autoinjector for the treatment of allergic reactions, in Sacramento, Calif. Price hikes for the emergency medicine have made its maker, Mylan, the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug prices.

"The substantial price increase could limit access to a much-needed medication," Grassley wrote to Mylan Chief Executive Heather Bresch in an Aug. 22 letter.

Larry Johnson 2021-05-14
img
As part of the Postal Service Reform Act, the USPS would receive another $8 billion to help make the majority of new mail carriers electric.
Emma Martin 2020-09-03
img
A leaked document from the agency warned that a "lack of time to research" could mean "serious errors discovered in the data may not be fixed."
Issac Pierce 2016-09-29
img

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 21: Mylan Inc. CEO Heather Bresch holds up a 2-pack of EpiPen as she testifies during a hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee September 21, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

The committee held a hearing on "Reviewing the Rising Price of EpiPens."

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Over the nine or so years that Mylan, Inc. has been selling—and hiking the price—of EpiPens, the drug company has been misclassifying the life-saving device and stiffing Medicaid out of full rebate payments, federal regulators told Ars.

Under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program, drug manufacturers, such as Mylan, can get their products covered by Medicaid if they agree to offer rebates to the government to offset costs.

With a brand-name drug such as the EpiPen, which currently has no generic versions and has patent protection, Mylan was supposed to classify the drug as a single source, or brand name drug.

Henry Lawrence 2021-06-16
img
FBI Director Christopher Wray told the House Oversight Committee a huge effort is ongoing to find people who took part in the January 6 Capitol riot.
William Hill 2016-12-19

WASHINGTON—A House committee has recommended Congress pass a new law to create national standards for how police officers and federal agents use powerful cellphone tracking technology in their investigations.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee staffers issued a bipartisan report Monday, the result of a yearlong probe launched after The Wall Street Journal and others wrote about how investigators were scanning innocent people s cellphones without search warrants to try to find criminals.

Such devices have a variety of brand names or nicknames, including dirtbox, Stingray and Hailstorm.

The Journal reported in 2014 that the U.S.

Marshals used such devices in small Cessna airplanes around the country to hunt for fugitives.

The Journal also reported the Marshals developed the technology with help from the Central Intelligence Agency.