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Richard Lee 2017-04-27
img

Not quite 'lock her up,' but they'll take what they can get – like formal criminal charges

US House Republicans are demanding prosecutors bring charges against the IT chap who hosted Hillary Clinton's private email service.

The chairman of the House of Reps' Science, Space, and Technology Committee, Lamar Smith (R‑TX), today sent a formal letter [PDF] to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, asking that charges be filed against Platte River Networks (PRN) and its CEO Treve Suazo.

Smith claims the tech biz failed to disclose or covered up its storage of Clinton's emails, which have been at the heart of congressional investigations over possible violations of government record-keeping laws.

The letter claims the IT company illegally withheld copies of the emails from Congress and Suazo himself lied to the committee.

"To date, Mr Suazo, on behalf of PRN and through his attorney, has refused to produce documents, as directed by congressional subpoenas duces tecum and refused to allow his employees to provide testimony to the Committee."

collect
0
Daniel Slye 2016-06-22
img

At about noon today civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis and other Democrats launched a sit-in on the House floor to force Republican leaders to grant a vote on gun-control measures.

Instead of agreeing to a vote, House Speaker Paul Ryan shut off the cameras in the House chamber.

The fault rests with Speaker Ryan, who decided to literally shut down the debate by cutting the public out.

If you think this is as outrageous as I do, you can send a message to Ryan s office.

Representatives are using Twitter and livestreaming apps like Periscope to show what s happening.

Throughout the afternoon we ve heard a mix of speeches and conversations about how to share what s happening with the public as Rep. Scott Peters encouraged other representatives to download Periscope, which was crashing due to the large volume of viewers.

collect
0
Reginald Carson 2017-07-18
img

Last Thursday, the US House of Representatives Agriculture Committee held a hearing on agriculture technology and data utilization in Washington, DC in preparation for the next Farm Bill which will be drafted early next year.

Congressman Rick Crawford (R) of Arkansas said “Farmers have a deep sense of mistrust where data is concerned around the idea of uploading their data into the cloud because there are no laws explicitly protecting that data.”

Congressman Rick Nolan (D) of Minnesota added that farmers have a right to be skeptical because their data could easily be used for “manipulation of market.”

At the same time, Witness Billy Tiller added that consumers are demanding a new level of transparency, and data is the only way to provide this throughout the supply chain.

“If these millennials want their food to talk and they do, they want traceability, the only way we’re gonna get their food to talk is with connectivity all the way back to the field,” said Tiller.

Witness Todd Janzen of Janzen Agricultural Law laid out three pain points for the growth of big data in farming: a lack of trust of agtech companies on the part of the farmer, the possibility of losing control of their own data when uploading to cloud-based storage, and a frustration with the complexity of the legal agreements they have to sign.

collect
0
Marc Anderson 2017-02-07
img

It s a tough to get through to your representatives right now.

How can you, the concerned citizen, get your message through?

You can help them understand what issues matter to you, and why you would like them to vote yes or no on a certain bill that s coming up.

Normally we d tell you a phone call is the best way to register your opinion, but a lot of the time my calls just go to voicemail—and then the mailbox is full.

She said to send an email through the form on the senator s website, since those messages go directly to the staffer in Washington who handles the relevant topic.

Emily Ellsworth, the former staffer who penned a famous series of tweets and a comprehensive guide explaining why you should call rather than write, agreed that sending an email—straight from the heart, not a form letter—is your next best bet.

collect
0
Loyd Davis 2016-11-23
img

If you want to contact your local Congressional representative, Call to Action makes the whole process really simple.

You just enter your address or location, and the app tells you who your representative is, where you can get a hold of them, and what you should say to get your point across.

Even better, if you re using the app on your phone, you can tap the phone number and just call directly from the app.

It s available for web only, so you ll just head to the website and enter your location.

It tells you what to expect from your phone call, too:

You will likely talk to an intern or Congressional staffer dedicated to constituent services.

collect
0
Johnny Huff 2017-11-17
img

Yesterday, the US House of Representatives passed its version of a tax bill that would drop corporate tax rates and alter various deductions.

While most of the arguments about the bill have focused on which tax brackets will end up paying more, an entire class of individuals appears to have been specifically targeted with a measure that could raise their tax liability by 300 percent or more: graduate student researchers.

Many graduate programs in areas like business, medicine, and law can afford to charge high tuitions.

Despite typically taking five to six years to complete, a PhD student is only likely to earn in the area of $44,000 after graduation if they're funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Even four years of additional experience doesn't raise the salary above $50,000.

Doing so would almost certainly discourage anyone but the independently wealthy from attending research-focused graduate programs.

collect
0
Bob Sun 2017-09-06
img

A bipartisan effort has brought proper national regulation of self-driving cars one step closer to reality.

Nearly every member of the US House of Representatives voted in favor of H.R.

3388, otherwise known as the Safely Ensuring Lives Future Deployment and Research In Vehicle Evolution (SELF DRIVE) Act.

The act passed subcommittee in July, and it left committee with a unanimous vote in its favor in that same month.

A basic summary of the bill is that it clarifies how responsibilities regarding the introduction of self-driving cars will be split between federal and state governments.

As The Hill puts it, the act puts authority over the car in the hands of the feds, with authority over the driver remaining within the purview of state government.

collect
0
Bryan White 2016-05-24
img

That s what the Kelsey Smith Act was looking to turn into law, according to Reuters.

She was found murdered four days later.

Smiths parents were at the House chamber during the vote.

The legislation s goal is laudable — to help find people deemed to be in emergency situations, according to R Street, a think tank based in Washington D.C.

But granting law enforcement extraordinary abilities to obtain cell data without receiving a probable cause warrant from a judge is yet another expansion of government surveillance power.

The Kelsey Smith Act was voted down 229 to 158, but Reuters reports that more than 20 states have already adopted a variant of the law since Smith s death.

collect
0
Robert Rock 2021-05-06
img
On Tuesday, India granted permission to several telecom service providers to conduct a six-month trial for the use and application of 5G technology in the country, except for the Chinese firms
collect
0
Brad Patterson 2019-02-26
img

Representatives of London's black cab drivers have lost their latest court battle against pantomime transport villain Uber, leaving the situation basically unchanged and everyone allowed to carry on being as angry as usual.

The United Cabbies Group was seeking to overturn last year's permit grant decision, on the grounds that the judge who ruled on the license was guilty of bias.

This bizarre Twitter-level of argument was escalated all the way to the High Court, where today a Lord Chief Justice and a regular old Mr Justice ruled that there was no bias in last year's decision to grant Uber a probationary permit to continue operating.

Lord Burnett seems to be suggesting the cabbies were wasting his time with this latest attempt at reeling in the app-based chauffeur booker, with his ruling explaining that the UCG's case was "...well short of evidence that would begin to give a fair-minded observer even pause for thought."

collect
0
Anthony Sullivan 2017-07-27
img

(Reuters) — An influential U.S. House committee on Thursday approved a revised bipartisan bill on a 54-0 vote that would speed the deployment of self-driving cars without human controls and bar states from blocking autonomous vehicles.

The bill would allow automakers to obtain exemptions to deploy up to 25,000 vehicles without meeting existing auto safety standards in the first year, a cap that would rise to 100,000 vehicles annually over three years.

Automakers and technology companies believe chances are good Congress will approve legislation before year end.

They have been pushing for regulations making it easier to deploy self-driving technology, while consumer groups have sought more safeguards.

Current federal rules bar self-driving cars without human controls on U.S. roads and automakers think proposed state rules in California are too restrictive.

The measure, the first significant federal legislation aimed at speeding self-driving cars to market, would require automakers to submit safety assessment reports to regulators, but would not require pre-market approval of advanced vehicle technologies.

collect
0
Ryan Pak 2021-07-26
img
The filing says the singer has "sufficient capacity" to handle her own finances.
collect
8
Robert Russo 2018-06-27

Ajit Pie sends his big mug to the telcos to fill up with money and return...

collect
0
Robert Flowers 2017-07-18
img

Self-driving cars could be free to roll out onto roads across the country if draft legislation being considered in committee eventually becomes law.

A US House of Representatives subcommittee is set to vote on Wednesday.

The draft legislation it'll vote on is aimed at hastening the development of self-driving cars, Reuters reports.

The legislation would allow automakers to introduce up to 100,000 self-driving vehicles without requiring those vehicles to adhere to federal vehicle safety standards, including a rule that bars the sale of vehicles without controls for human drivers.

It would also prevent states from establishing regulations that would prevent these deployments.

If it passes committee, the legislation has a long way to go before becoming law.

collect
0
Beatrice Patterson 2017-09-26
img

Clinton calls hypocrisy but somewhat misses the point

The US House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform has sent a letter [PDF] to White House lawyers demanding details of how many of its staffers have been using private email for government business.

On Sunday, Politico reported that the President's son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner used private email to conduct some government business since late last year, which could be a violation of the Presidential Records Act.

On Monday, the number of staffers accused of similar had risen to six, including Kushner.

Separately, documents released by an advocacy group claim the President's daughter Ivanka Trump has been using a personal email account for government business, too, although she is not a paid staffer.

"With numerous public revelations of senior executive branch employees deliberately trying to circumvent these laws by using personal, private, or alias email addresses to conduct official government business, the Committee has aimed to use its oversight and investigative resources to prevent and deter misuse of private forms of written communication," reads the committee letter, sent on Monday.

collect
0
Nicholas Patton 2021-03-23
img
This week's Big Tech hearing will surely be a waste of Congress's time, again. But the DOJ and SEC could buy time by raising the stakes.
collect
0
Richard Lee 2017-04-27
img

Not quite 'lock her up,' but they'll take what they can get – like formal criminal charges

US House Republicans are demanding prosecutors bring charges against the IT chap who hosted Hillary Clinton's private email service.

The chairman of the House of Reps' Science, Space, and Technology Committee, Lamar Smith (R‑TX), today sent a formal letter [PDF] to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, asking that charges be filed against Platte River Networks (PRN) and its CEO Treve Suazo.

Smith claims the tech biz failed to disclose or covered up its storage of Clinton's emails, which have been at the heart of congressional investigations over possible violations of government record-keeping laws.

The letter claims the IT company illegally withheld copies of the emails from Congress and Suazo himself lied to the committee.

"To date, Mr Suazo, on behalf of PRN and through his attorney, has refused to produce documents, as directed by congressional subpoenas duces tecum and refused to allow his employees to provide testimony to the Committee."

Reginald Carson 2017-07-18
img

Last Thursday, the US House of Representatives Agriculture Committee held a hearing on agriculture technology and data utilization in Washington, DC in preparation for the next Farm Bill which will be drafted early next year.

Congressman Rick Crawford (R) of Arkansas said “Farmers have a deep sense of mistrust where data is concerned around the idea of uploading their data into the cloud because there are no laws explicitly protecting that data.”

Congressman Rick Nolan (D) of Minnesota added that farmers have a right to be skeptical because their data could easily be used for “manipulation of market.”

At the same time, Witness Billy Tiller added that consumers are demanding a new level of transparency, and data is the only way to provide this throughout the supply chain.

“If these millennials want their food to talk and they do, they want traceability, the only way we’re gonna get their food to talk is with connectivity all the way back to the field,” said Tiller.

Witness Todd Janzen of Janzen Agricultural Law laid out three pain points for the growth of big data in farming: a lack of trust of agtech companies on the part of the farmer, the possibility of losing control of their own data when uploading to cloud-based storage, and a frustration with the complexity of the legal agreements they have to sign.

Loyd Davis 2016-11-23
img

If you want to contact your local Congressional representative, Call to Action makes the whole process really simple.

You just enter your address or location, and the app tells you who your representative is, where you can get a hold of them, and what you should say to get your point across.

Even better, if you re using the app on your phone, you can tap the phone number and just call directly from the app.

It s available for web only, so you ll just head to the website and enter your location.

It tells you what to expect from your phone call, too:

You will likely talk to an intern or Congressional staffer dedicated to constituent services.

Bob Sun 2017-09-06
img

A bipartisan effort has brought proper national regulation of self-driving cars one step closer to reality.

Nearly every member of the US House of Representatives voted in favor of H.R.

3388, otherwise known as the Safely Ensuring Lives Future Deployment and Research In Vehicle Evolution (SELF DRIVE) Act.

The act passed subcommittee in July, and it left committee with a unanimous vote in its favor in that same month.

A basic summary of the bill is that it clarifies how responsibilities regarding the introduction of self-driving cars will be split between federal and state governments.

As The Hill puts it, the act puts authority over the car in the hands of the feds, with authority over the driver remaining within the purview of state government.

Robert Rock 2021-05-06
img
On Tuesday, India granted permission to several telecom service providers to conduct a six-month trial for the use and application of 5G technology in the country, except for the Chinese firms
Anthony Sullivan 2017-07-27
img

(Reuters) — An influential U.S. House committee on Thursday approved a revised bipartisan bill on a 54-0 vote that would speed the deployment of self-driving cars without human controls and bar states from blocking autonomous vehicles.

The bill would allow automakers to obtain exemptions to deploy up to 25,000 vehicles without meeting existing auto safety standards in the first year, a cap that would rise to 100,000 vehicles annually over three years.

Automakers and technology companies believe chances are good Congress will approve legislation before year end.

They have been pushing for regulations making it easier to deploy self-driving technology, while consumer groups have sought more safeguards.

Current federal rules bar self-driving cars without human controls on U.S. roads and automakers think proposed state rules in California are too restrictive.

The measure, the first significant federal legislation aimed at speeding self-driving cars to market, would require automakers to submit safety assessment reports to regulators, but would not require pre-market approval of advanced vehicle technologies.

Robert Russo 2018-06-27

Ajit Pie sends his big mug to the telcos to fill up with money and return...

Beatrice Patterson 2017-09-26
img

Clinton calls hypocrisy but somewhat misses the point

The US House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform has sent a letter [PDF] to White House lawyers demanding details of how many of its staffers have been using private email for government business.

On Sunday, Politico reported that the President's son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner used private email to conduct some government business since late last year, which could be a violation of the Presidential Records Act.

On Monday, the number of staffers accused of similar had risen to six, including Kushner.

Separately, documents released by an advocacy group claim the President's daughter Ivanka Trump has been using a personal email account for government business, too, although she is not a paid staffer.

"With numerous public revelations of senior executive branch employees deliberately trying to circumvent these laws by using personal, private, or alias email addresses to conduct official government business, the Committee has aimed to use its oversight and investigative resources to prevent and deter misuse of private forms of written communication," reads the committee letter, sent on Monday.

Daniel Slye 2016-06-22
img

At about noon today civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis and other Democrats launched a sit-in on the House floor to force Republican leaders to grant a vote on gun-control measures.

Instead of agreeing to a vote, House Speaker Paul Ryan shut off the cameras in the House chamber.

The fault rests with Speaker Ryan, who decided to literally shut down the debate by cutting the public out.

If you think this is as outrageous as I do, you can send a message to Ryan s office.

Representatives are using Twitter and livestreaming apps like Periscope to show what s happening.

Throughout the afternoon we ve heard a mix of speeches and conversations about how to share what s happening with the public as Rep. Scott Peters encouraged other representatives to download Periscope, which was crashing due to the large volume of viewers.

Marc Anderson 2017-02-07
img

It s a tough to get through to your representatives right now.

How can you, the concerned citizen, get your message through?

You can help them understand what issues matter to you, and why you would like them to vote yes or no on a certain bill that s coming up.

Normally we d tell you a phone call is the best way to register your opinion, but a lot of the time my calls just go to voicemail—and then the mailbox is full.

She said to send an email through the form on the senator s website, since those messages go directly to the staffer in Washington who handles the relevant topic.

Emily Ellsworth, the former staffer who penned a famous series of tweets and a comprehensive guide explaining why you should call rather than write, agreed that sending an email—straight from the heart, not a form letter—is your next best bet.

Johnny Huff 2017-11-17
img

Yesterday, the US House of Representatives passed its version of a tax bill that would drop corporate tax rates and alter various deductions.

While most of the arguments about the bill have focused on which tax brackets will end up paying more, an entire class of individuals appears to have been specifically targeted with a measure that could raise their tax liability by 300 percent or more: graduate student researchers.

Many graduate programs in areas like business, medicine, and law can afford to charge high tuitions.

Despite typically taking five to six years to complete, a PhD student is only likely to earn in the area of $44,000 after graduation if they're funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Even four years of additional experience doesn't raise the salary above $50,000.

Doing so would almost certainly discourage anyone but the independently wealthy from attending research-focused graduate programs.

Bryan White 2016-05-24
img

That s what the Kelsey Smith Act was looking to turn into law, according to Reuters.

She was found murdered four days later.

Smiths parents were at the House chamber during the vote.

The legislation s goal is laudable — to help find people deemed to be in emergency situations, according to R Street, a think tank based in Washington D.C.

But granting law enforcement extraordinary abilities to obtain cell data without receiving a probable cause warrant from a judge is yet another expansion of government surveillance power.

The Kelsey Smith Act was voted down 229 to 158, but Reuters reports that more than 20 states have already adopted a variant of the law since Smith s death.

Brad Patterson 2019-02-26
img

Representatives of London's black cab drivers have lost their latest court battle against pantomime transport villain Uber, leaving the situation basically unchanged and everyone allowed to carry on being as angry as usual.

The United Cabbies Group was seeking to overturn last year's permit grant decision, on the grounds that the judge who ruled on the license was guilty of bias.

This bizarre Twitter-level of argument was escalated all the way to the High Court, where today a Lord Chief Justice and a regular old Mr Justice ruled that there was no bias in last year's decision to grant Uber a probationary permit to continue operating.

Lord Burnett seems to be suggesting the cabbies were wasting his time with this latest attempt at reeling in the app-based chauffeur booker, with his ruling explaining that the UCG's case was "...well short of evidence that would begin to give a fair-minded observer even pause for thought."

Ryan Pak 2021-07-26
img
The filing says the singer has "sufficient capacity" to handle her own finances.
Robert Flowers 2017-07-18
img

Self-driving cars could be free to roll out onto roads across the country if draft legislation being considered in committee eventually becomes law.

A US House of Representatives subcommittee is set to vote on Wednesday.

The draft legislation it'll vote on is aimed at hastening the development of self-driving cars, Reuters reports.

The legislation would allow automakers to introduce up to 100,000 self-driving vehicles without requiring those vehicles to adhere to federal vehicle safety standards, including a rule that bars the sale of vehicles without controls for human drivers.

It would also prevent states from establishing regulations that would prevent these deployments.

If it passes committee, the legislation has a long way to go before becoming law.

Nicholas Patton 2021-03-23
img
This week's Big Tech hearing will surely be a waste of Congress's time, again. But the DOJ and SEC could buy time by raising the stakes.