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Richard Skaggs 2021-01-12
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility.
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James Dixon 2017-07-17

There are some amazing examples of how smart electroencephalography (EEG) interfaces can allow people to control everything from drones to prosthetic limbs using their thoughts.

Neurologists at the University of Washington have just added yet another impressive feat to the collection by developing a hands-free, thought-controlled musical instrument — no movement required!

Its creators hope the technology can be used to help empower and rehab patients who have motor disabilities, resulting from stroke, spinal cord injury, amputation, or other pathologies.

“What’s exciting to me is that this combines two passions of mine: music and helping those with neurological disorders, that were previously two completely different lives I lived,” Thomas Deuel, the University of Washington neuroscientist who led the project, told Digital Trends.

The “Encephalophone” technology works using a brain cap that is able to turn brain signals into musical notes.

It analyzes two brain signals associated either with the visual cortex or the part of the brain that deals with thoughts concerning movement.

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Oliver Dyer 2021-04-19
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers worked with almost 260 people to understand online disagreements and to develop potential design interventions that could make these discussions more productive and centered around relationship-building.
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Marion Kimberlin 2017-03-09

The University of Washington has received $50 million to promote its computer science and engineering department into a stand-alone school named for Microsoft Corp. co-founder Paul G. Allen.

The Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering will be backed by a $40 million gift from Mr. Allen, and another $10 million from Microsoft...

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Marc Anderson 2021-07-22
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed a method that uses a gaming graphics card to control plasma formation in their prototype fusion reactor.
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Jonathan Spitzer 2021-02-04
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(University of Washington) A University of Washington team created Audeo, a system that can generate music using only visual cues of someone playing the piano.
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Jerrod Fenton 2021-04-20
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(University of Washington) A new study led by University of Washington researchers borrowed image-analysis methods from engineering to spot the minute movements of a stony coral.
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Carlton Barr 2020-07-16
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Researchers from the University of Washington have developed a tiny wireless camera that is steerable and is small enough to fit on the back of an insect. The camera can stream video to a smartphone at between one and five frames per second and sits on a mechanical arm that can pivot 60 degrees. The pivoting design of the camera … Continue reading
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Cornelius Jones 2020-10-28
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed SoundWatch, a smartwatch app for deaf, Deaf and hard-of-hearing people who want to be aware of nearby sounds.
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John Nelson 2021-03-09
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed a new skill for a smart speaker that for the first time monitors both regular and irregular heartbeats without physical contact.
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Angel Collins 2021-04-01
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(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led team has developed a method that uses the camera on a person's smartphone or computer to take their pulse and breathing rate from a real-time video of their face.
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Dana Millard 2021-01-08
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(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material.
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Leon Bailey 2021-03-04
(University of Washington) With the help of about 200 human puzzle-takers, a computer model and functional MRI images, University of Washington researchers have learned more about the processes of reasoning and decision making, pinpointing the brain pathway that springs into action when problem-solving goes south.
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Robert Carter 2020-10-06
(University of Washington) A team led by the University of Washington reports that carefully constructed stacks of graphene -- a 2D form of carbon -- can exhibit highly correlated electron properties. The team also found evidence that this type of collective behavior likely relates to the emergence of exotic magnetic states.
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Jeanne Hoffman 2021-04-21
(University of Washington) Using satellite photos of three cities and drawing upon methods used to manipulate video and audio files, a team of researchers led by the University of Washington set out to identify new ways of detecting fake satellite photos and warn of the dangers of falsified geospatial data.
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Richard Bond 2021-05-31
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(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers examined multiple models recently put forward as potential tools for accurately detecting COVID-19 from chest X-rays. The team found that, rather than learning genuine medical pathology, these models rely instead on shortcut learning to draw spurious associations between medically irrelevant factors and disease status.
collect
0
Richard Skaggs 2021-01-12
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility.
Oliver Dyer 2021-04-19
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers worked with almost 260 people to understand online disagreements and to develop potential design interventions that could make these discussions more productive and centered around relationship-building.
Marc Anderson 2021-07-22
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed a method that uses a gaming graphics card to control plasma formation in their prototype fusion reactor.
Jerrod Fenton 2021-04-20
img
(University of Washington) A new study led by University of Washington researchers borrowed image-analysis methods from engineering to spot the minute movements of a stony coral.
Cornelius Jones 2020-10-28
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed SoundWatch, a smartwatch app for deaf, Deaf and hard-of-hearing people who want to be aware of nearby sounds.
Angel Collins 2021-04-01
img
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led team has developed a method that uses the camera on a person's smartphone or computer to take their pulse and breathing rate from a real-time video of their face.
Leon Bailey 2021-03-04
(University of Washington) With the help of about 200 human puzzle-takers, a computer model and functional MRI images, University of Washington researchers have learned more about the processes of reasoning and decision making, pinpointing the brain pathway that springs into action when problem-solving goes south.
Jeanne Hoffman 2021-04-21
(University of Washington) Using satellite photos of three cities and drawing upon methods used to manipulate video and audio files, a team of researchers led by the University of Washington set out to identify new ways of detecting fake satellite photos and warn of the dangers of falsified geospatial data.
James Dixon 2017-07-17

There are some amazing examples of how smart electroencephalography (EEG) interfaces can allow people to control everything from drones to prosthetic limbs using their thoughts.

Neurologists at the University of Washington have just added yet another impressive feat to the collection by developing a hands-free, thought-controlled musical instrument — no movement required!

Its creators hope the technology can be used to help empower and rehab patients who have motor disabilities, resulting from stroke, spinal cord injury, amputation, or other pathologies.

“What’s exciting to me is that this combines two passions of mine: music and helping those with neurological disorders, that were previously two completely different lives I lived,” Thomas Deuel, the University of Washington neuroscientist who led the project, told Digital Trends.

The “Encephalophone” technology works using a brain cap that is able to turn brain signals into musical notes.

It analyzes two brain signals associated either with the visual cortex or the part of the brain that deals with thoughts concerning movement.

Marion Kimberlin 2017-03-09

The University of Washington has received $50 million to promote its computer science and engineering department into a stand-alone school named for Microsoft Corp. co-founder Paul G. Allen.

The Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering will be backed by a $40 million gift from Mr. Allen, and another $10 million from Microsoft...

Jonathan Spitzer 2021-02-04
img
(University of Washington) A University of Washington team created Audeo, a system that can generate music using only visual cues of someone playing the piano.
Carlton Barr 2020-07-16
img
Researchers from the University of Washington have developed a tiny wireless camera that is steerable and is small enough to fit on the back of an insect. The camera can stream video to a smartphone at between one and five frames per second and sits on a mechanical arm that can pivot 60 degrees. The pivoting design of the camera … Continue reading
John Nelson 2021-03-09
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers have developed a new skill for a smart speaker that for the first time monitors both regular and irregular heartbeats without physical contact.
Dana Millard 2021-01-08
img
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material.
Robert Carter 2020-10-06
(University of Washington) A team led by the University of Washington reports that carefully constructed stacks of graphene -- a 2D form of carbon -- can exhibit highly correlated electron properties. The team also found evidence that this type of collective behavior likely relates to the emergence of exotic magnetic states.
Richard Bond 2021-05-31
img
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers examined multiple models recently put forward as potential tools for accurately detecting COVID-19 from chest X-rays. The team found that, rather than learning genuine medical pathology, these models rely instead on shortcut learning to draw spurious associations between medically irrelevant factors and disease status.