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Daniel Patel 2021-06-11
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(JAMA Network) What The Study Did: Researchers compared the association between symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels in children and adults.
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0
fareed khatri 2020-06-25

This is no subject for teenagers.

Regular cannabis use can affect developing brains more acutely than adult ones.

There is a strong correlation between teen use and later development of cannabis use disorder.Of the University of Washington School of Medicine finds, “if we can prevent or reduce chronic depression during early adolescence, we may reduce the prevalence of cannabis-use disorder.” But, studies have not investigated whether early cannabis use leads to depression.

collect
0
Tom Brown 2021-05-05
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) A new, high-quality bonobo genome assembly has been constructed. It is allowing scientists to more accurately compare the bonobo genome to that of other great apes - the gorilla, orangutan, chimpanzee - and to the modern human. This analysis is revealing new information about hominid evolution, distinctions between chimps and bonobos and genetic relations among present-day hominids, and predicts a greater fraction of the human genome is genetically closer to chimps and bonobos.
collect
0
fareed khatri 2020-06-21

This is no subject for teenagers.

Regular cannabis use can affect developing brains more acutely than adult ones.

There is a strong correlation between teen use and later development of cannabis use disorder.Of the University of Washington School of Medicine finds, “if we can prevent or reduce chronic depression during early adolescence, we may reduce the prevalence of cannabis-use disorder.” But, studies have not investigated whether early cannabis use leads to depression.https://order420weedkhushus.com/

collect
0
Jennifer True 2018-12-19
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Proteins have now been designed in the lab to zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix.

The technique, whose development was led by University of Washington School of Medicine scientists, could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially help diagnose and treat disease, allow for the more exact engineering of cells and perform a wide variety of other tasks.

"For any machine to work, its parts must come together precisely," said Zibo Chen, the lead author of the paper and a UW graduate student in biochemistry.

"This technique makes it possible for you to design proteins so they come together exactly how you want them to."

In the past, researchers interested in designing biomolecular nanomachines have often used DNA as a major component.

This is because DNA strands come together and form hydrogen bonds to create DNA's double helix, but only if their sequences are complementary.

collect
0
Richard Skaggs 2021-01-12
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility.
collect
0
Jason Hill 2017-12-14
img

Protein assemblies, designed and built from scratch to carry molecular cargo, are advancing both synthetic life research and engineering efforts for targeted drug delivery.

Scientists have succeeded in developing the first reported synthetic protein assemblies that encapsulate their own genetic materials and evolve new traits in complex environments.

The lead authors of the paper are Gabriel L. Butterfield and Marc J. Lajoie at the University of Washington Institute for Protein Design.

"Targeted drug delivery is a major unsolved need in medicine," Lajoie noted, "Currently, researchers are using viruses, which are effective, but difficult to engineer, or they are using polymeric nanoparticles, which are engineerable, but less effective at targeted delivery."

The work was conducted in the laboratories of UW Medicine researchers David Baker, professor of biochemistry, and Neil King, assistant professor of biochemistry, both at the UW School of Medicine; and Suzie Pun, the Robert F. Rushmer Professor of Bioengineering at the UW.

Lajoie explained that, unlike living viruses, these synthetic genetic cargo-carriers can't copy themselves to reproduce.

collect
0
Alan Krieg 2019-05-16
img

Synthetic proteins have been created that move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways.

These motile molecules were designed from scratch on computers, then produced inside living cells.

To function, natural proteins often shift their shapes in precise ways.

The May 17 issue of Science reports the successful design of molecules that change shape in response to pH changes.

The Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington School of Medicine led the multi-institutional research.

The researchers set out to create synthetic proteins that self-assemble into designed configurations at neutral pH and quickly disassemble in the presence of acid.

collect
0
Juan Hackwell 2019-02-01
img

The revamped versions were developed and tested at UW Medicine labs in animal models of muscular dystrophy.

The results will be published Feb. 1 in Molecular Therapy, a Cell Press journal.

The treatment-carrying vehicles are re-tooled from small, adeno-associated viruses.

These repurposed viruses can still enter human cells.

Adeno-associated viruses do not cause infections, but can evoke an immune response that is usually mild.

Jeffrey S. Chamberlain, professor of neurology, medicine and biochemistry at the University of Washington School of Medicine, has been continuously involved in this research, from the invention of his lab's original gene therapy cassettes to their recent revamping.

collect
0
Charles Rodriguez 2018-01-02
img

One of the reasons it’s so difficult to create a cure for the flu is because the virus continually shape-shifts from year to year.

That means getting annual flu shots, instead of a more permanent solution to the problem.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine may have just changed the game, however.

Investigators in Professor Deborah Fuller’s lab have developed a DNA vaccine that could lead to a universal, one-dose flu vaccine.

“The current flu vaccine is an inactivated virus,” Fuller told Digital Trends.

“The whole virus is first grown in eggs, then it’s inactivated and injected.

collect
0
Samuel Norton 2018-07-02
img

Researchers at UW Medicine in Seattle have successfully used human stem cells to restore heart function in monkeys with heart failure.

The findings suggest that the technique will be effective in patients with heart failure, the leading cause of death in the world.

"The cells form new muscle that integrates into heart so that it pumps vigorously again," said Dr. Charles "Chuck" Murry, professor of pathology at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Murry and his colleagues report their findings in the July 2 issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

The paper's lead authors are Drs.

Yen-Wen Liu, Billy Chen and Xiulan Yang.

collect
0
Billy Haigh 2017-08-17
img

The roundworm stars in the first-ever compilation of gene readouts in every kind of cell in an animal.

Each cell type has its own selective activation of parts of the individual's genetic code.

UW Medicine researchers wanted to create a resource for getting at the reasons behind the wide cell variety within the same organism.

The senior scientists on the project were Robert Waterston, professor and chair of the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine; Cole Trapnell, UW assistant professor of genome science; and Jay Shendure, UW professor of genome sciences and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

The lead scientists were UW School of Medicine graduate students Junyue Cao and Jonathan Packer.

They become the set of directions for protein production or other cellular activities.

collect
0
Ruth Reed 2018-12-03
img

There’s been plenty of innovation when it comes to fertility-based technologies over the past few decades.

Outside of condoms or vasectomies, options have been practically non-existent.

It is absorbed through the skin by rubbing it into the upper arms and shoulders.

Once absorbed, it reduces the overall concentration of sperm to levels intended to negate the risk of pregnancy.

It is 100 percent reversible, promises to be affordable, and, as far as studies have shown so far, is entirely safe.

“The man has normal testosterone function and normal sexual function, such as volume and frequency of ejaculate, but doesn’t have any spermatozoa in the ejaculate.”

collect
0
Jeanette Perea 2018-05-17
img

An automated system that uses robots has been designed to rapidly produce human mini-organs derived from stem cells.

Researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle developed the new system.

"This is a new 'secret weapon' in our fight against disease,' said Freedman, who is a scientist at the UW Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, as well as at the Kidney Research Institute, a collaboration between the Northwest Kidney Centers and UW Medicine.

In recent years, researchers have been increasingly successful in growing stem cells into more complex, three-dimensional structures called mini-organs or organoids.

In this process, the liquid-handling robots introduced the stem cells into plates that contained as many as 384 miniature wells each, and then coaxed them to turn into kidney organoids over 21 days.

With a speed that would have impressed Henry Ford's car assembly line, the robots could produce many plates in a fraction of the time.

collect
0
Phillip Willis 2017-07-13
img

The stage is set for a new era of data-driven protein molecular engineering as advances in DNA synthesis technology merge with improvements in computational design of new proteins.

This week's Science reports the largest-scale testing of folding stability for computationally designed proteins, made possible by a new high-throughput approach.

The lead author of the paper is Gabriel Rocklin, a postdoctoral fellow in biochemistry at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The senior authors are Cheryl Arrowsmith, of the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, the Structural Genomics Consortium and the Department of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto, and David Baker, UW professor of biochemistry and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

Researchers want to build new molecules, not found naturally, that can perform tasks in preventing or treating disease, in industrial applications, in energy production, and in environmental cleanups.

"We learned a huge amount at this new scale, but the taste has given us an even larger appetite," said Rocklin.

collect
0
Lawrence Bowman 2017-08-09
img

New research, perhaps the deepest, data-based dive into this suggestion, finds that weather conditions in 45 U.S. cities are indeed associated with Google searches about joint pain.

As temperatures rose within the study's focus span of 23 degrees to 86 degrees Fahrenheit, searches about knee and hip pain rose steadily, too.

Knee-pain searches peaked at 73 degrees and were less frequent at higher temperatures.

The findings, to be published Aug. 9 in PLOS ONE, indicate that people's activity level - increasing as temperatures rise, to a point - is likelier than the weather itself to cause pain that spurs online searches, say investigators from UW Medicine in Seattle and Harvard University.

"We were surprised by how consistent the results were throughout the range of temperatures in cities across the country," said Scott Telfer, a researcher in orthopedics and sports medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The investigators used Google Trends, a resource that reflects global use of the company's search engine.

collect
0
Daniel Patel 2021-06-11
img
(JAMA Network) What The Study Did: Researchers compared the association between symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels in children and adults.
Tom Brown 2021-05-05
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) A new, high-quality bonobo genome assembly has been constructed. It is allowing scientists to more accurately compare the bonobo genome to that of other great apes - the gorilla, orangutan, chimpanzee - and to the modern human. This analysis is revealing new information about hominid evolution, distinctions between chimps and bonobos and genetic relations among present-day hominids, and predicts a greater fraction of the human genome is genetically closer to chimps and bonobos.
Jennifer True 2018-12-19
img

Proteins have now been designed in the lab to zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix.

The technique, whose development was led by University of Washington School of Medicine scientists, could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially help diagnose and treat disease, allow for the more exact engineering of cells and perform a wide variety of other tasks.

"For any machine to work, its parts must come together precisely," said Zibo Chen, the lead author of the paper and a UW graduate student in biochemistry.

"This technique makes it possible for you to design proteins so they come together exactly how you want them to."

In the past, researchers interested in designing biomolecular nanomachines have often used DNA as a major component.

This is because DNA strands come together and form hydrogen bonds to create DNA's double helix, but only if their sequences are complementary.

Jason Hill 2017-12-14
img

Protein assemblies, designed and built from scratch to carry molecular cargo, are advancing both synthetic life research and engineering efforts for targeted drug delivery.

Scientists have succeeded in developing the first reported synthetic protein assemblies that encapsulate their own genetic materials and evolve new traits in complex environments.

The lead authors of the paper are Gabriel L. Butterfield and Marc J. Lajoie at the University of Washington Institute for Protein Design.

"Targeted drug delivery is a major unsolved need in medicine," Lajoie noted, "Currently, researchers are using viruses, which are effective, but difficult to engineer, or they are using polymeric nanoparticles, which are engineerable, but less effective at targeted delivery."

The work was conducted in the laboratories of UW Medicine researchers David Baker, professor of biochemistry, and Neil King, assistant professor of biochemistry, both at the UW School of Medicine; and Suzie Pun, the Robert F. Rushmer Professor of Bioengineering at the UW.

Lajoie explained that, unlike living viruses, these synthetic genetic cargo-carriers can't copy themselves to reproduce.

Juan Hackwell 2019-02-01
img

The revamped versions were developed and tested at UW Medicine labs in animal models of muscular dystrophy.

The results will be published Feb. 1 in Molecular Therapy, a Cell Press journal.

The treatment-carrying vehicles are re-tooled from small, adeno-associated viruses.

These repurposed viruses can still enter human cells.

Adeno-associated viruses do not cause infections, but can evoke an immune response that is usually mild.

Jeffrey S. Chamberlain, professor of neurology, medicine and biochemistry at the University of Washington School of Medicine, has been continuously involved in this research, from the invention of his lab's original gene therapy cassettes to their recent revamping.

Samuel Norton 2018-07-02
img

Researchers at UW Medicine in Seattle have successfully used human stem cells to restore heart function in monkeys with heart failure.

The findings suggest that the technique will be effective in patients with heart failure, the leading cause of death in the world.

"The cells form new muscle that integrates into heart so that it pumps vigorously again," said Dr. Charles "Chuck" Murry, professor of pathology at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

Murry and his colleagues report their findings in the July 2 issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

The paper's lead authors are Drs.

Yen-Wen Liu, Billy Chen and Xiulan Yang.

Ruth Reed 2018-12-03
img

There’s been plenty of innovation when it comes to fertility-based technologies over the past few decades.

Outside of condoms or vasectomies, options have been practically non-existent.

It is absorbed through the skin by rubbing it into the upper arms and shoulders.

Once absorbed, it reduces the overall concentration of sperm to levels intended to negate the risk of pregnancy.

It is 100 percent reversible, promises to be affordable, and, as far as studies have shown so far, is entirely safe.

“The man has normal testosterone function and normal sexual function, such as volume and frequency of ejaculate, but doesn’t have any spermatozoa in the ejaculate.”

Phillip Willis 2017-07-13
img

The stage is set for a new era of data-driven protein molecular engineering as advances in DNA synthesis technology merge with improvements in computational design of new proteins.

This week's Science reports the largest-scale testing of folding stability for computationally designed proteins, made possible by a new high-throughput approach.

The lead author of the paper is Gabriel Rocklin, a postdoctoral fellow in biochemistry at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The senior authors are Cheryl Arrowsmith, of the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, the Structural Genomics Consortium and the Department of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto, and David Baker, UW professor of biochemistry and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

Researchers want to build new molecules, not found naturally, that can perform tasks in preventing or treating disease, in industrial applications, in energy production, and in environmental cleanups.

"We learned a huge amount at this new scale, but the taste has given us an even larger appetite," said Rocklin.

fareed khatri 2020-06-25

This is no subject for teenagers.

Regular cannabis use can affect developing brains more acutely than adult ones.

There is a strong correlation between teen use and later development of cannabis use disorder.Of the University of Washington School of Medicine finds, “if we can prevent or reduce chronic depression during early adolescence, we may reduce the prevalence of cannabis-use disorder.” But, studies have not investigated whether early cannabis use leads to depression.

fareed khatri 2020-06-21

This is no subject for teenagers.

Regular cannabis use can affect developing brains more acutely than adult ones.

There is a strong correlation between teen use and later development of cannabis use disorder.Of the University of Washington School of Medicine finds, “if we can prevent or reduce chronic depression during early adolescence, we may reduce the prevalence of cannabis-use disorder.” But, studies have not investigated whether early cannabis use leads to depression.https://order420weedkhushus.com/

Richard Skaggs 2021-01-12
(University of Washington) University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility.
Alan Krieg 2019-05-16
img

Synthetic proteins have been created that move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways.

These motile molecules were designed from scratch on computers, then produced inside living cells.

To function, natural proteins often shift their shapes in precise ways.

The May 17 issue of Science reports the successful design of molecules that change shape in response to pH changes.

The Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington School of Medicine led the multi-institutional research.

The researchers set out to create synthetic proteins that self-assemble into designed configurations at neutral pH and quickly disassemble in the presence of acid.

Charles Rodriguez 2018-01-02
img

One of the reasons it’s so difficult to create a cure for the flu is because the virus continually shape-shifts from year to year.

That means getting annual flu shots, instead of a more permanent solution to the problem.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine may have just changed the game, however.

Investigators in Professor Deborah Fuller’s lab have developed a DNA vaccine that could lead to a universal, one-dose flu vaccine.

“The current flu vaccine is an inactivated virus,” Fuller told Digital Trends.

“The whole virus is first grown in eggs, then it’s inactivated and injected.

Billy Haigh 2017-08-17
img

The roundworm stars in the first-ever compilation of gene readouts in every kind of cell in an animal.

Each cell type has its own selective activation of parts of the individual's genetic code.

UW Medicine researchers wanted to create a resource for getting at the reasons behind the wide cell variety within the same organism.

The senior scientists on the project were Robert Waterston, professor and chair of the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine; Cole Trapnell, UW assistant professor of genome science; and Jay Shendure, UW professor of genome sciences and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

The lead scientists were UW School of Medicine graduate students Junyue Cao and Jonathan Packer.

They become the set of directions for protein production or other cellular activities.

Jeanette Perea 2018-05-17
img

An automated system that uses robots has been designed to rapidly produce human mini-organs derived from stem cells.

Researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle developed the new system.

"This is a new 'secret weapon' in our fight against disease,' said Freedman, who is a scientist at the UW Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, as well as at the Kidney Research Institute, a collaboration between the Northwest Kidney Centers and UW Medicine.

In recent years, researchers have been increasingly successful in growing stem cells into more complex, three-dimensional structures called mini-organs or organoids.

In this process, the liquid-handling robots introduced the stem cells into plates that contained as many as 384 miniature wells each, and then coaxed them to turn into kidney organoids over 21 days.

With a speed that would have impressed Henry Ford's car assembly line, the robots could produce many plates in a fraction of the time.

Lawrence Bowman 2017-08-09
img

New research, perhaps the deepest, data-based dive into this suggestion, finds that weather conditions in 45 U.S. cities are indeed associated with Google searches about joint pain.

As temperatures rose within the study's focus span of 23 degrees to 86 degrees Fahrenheit, searches about knee and hip pain rose steadily, too.

Knee-pain searches peaked at 73 degrees and were less frequent at higher temperatures.

The findings, to be published Aug. 9 in PLOS ONE, indicate that people's activity level - increasing as temperatures rise, to a point - is likelier than the weather itself to cause pain that spurs online searches, say investigators from UW Medicine in Seattle and Harvard University.

"We were surprised by how consistent the results were throughout the range of temperatures in cities across the country," said Scott Telfer, a researcher in orthopedics and sports medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

The investigators used Google Trends, a resource that reflects global use of the company's search engine.