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Debra Simonds 2018-06-06
img

Co-inventor of TCP/IP and so-called "Father of the Internet" Vint Cerf has urged network nerds to "get with the program" on World IPv6 Day.

In a video to celebrate six years since the creation of World IPv6 Launch, Cerf offers optimistic impatience with the rollout of the next-generation network addressing protocol.

He notes that not only did IPv4 address space run out in 2011 (sort of) but that internet engineers anticipated the problem back in 1996 and so developed IPv6 to allow the internet to continue expanding unhindered.

"It's certainly been a long time since the standards were put in place," Cerf reflected.

Although IPv6 is now available on roughly 22-25 per cent of the internet there is, he notes, "a long way to go to get to 100 per cent – which is where we need to be."

It's worth noting that if it wasn't for Vint Cerf, IPv4 address space would have run out much, much sooner.

collect
0
James Desmond 2018-12-05
img

Internet inventor Vint Cerf and David Nordfors, co-founder of the i4j, believe that it is artificial intelligence that can create our new jobs.

Now, there is an urgent need to be at least as good at creating new and better jobs instead of those who disappears.

We have found a new approach with two main components: to enhance people's economic value and create a more humane economy.

the Goal of innovation should be a sustainable economy where we work with those we like, valued by society and have a good home with near and dear ones.

despite the fact that information technology and artificial intelligence, ai, increases our innovative power enormously, we seem to still not be closer to the goal, on the contrary, spreads the fear of losing jobs to machines.

the Right question is: How can we use the new technology to create better job?

collect
0
Ryan Pak 2017-12-12
img

Vint Cerf, Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Steve Wozniak are amongst those calling for this week’s vote to be called off amidst a ‘lack of transparency’

Twenty-one figures who contributed to the early internet have asked the US Senate to block a planned vote this week by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that would repeal “network neutrality” regulations.

The signatories of the open letter, who include Vint Cerf, Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Steve Wozniak, said the FCC’s planned vote on Thursday would remove long-standing oversight over internet access providers “without an adequate replacement to protect consumers, free markets and online innovation”.

The FCC’s low-regulation approach is “based on a flawed and factually inaccurate understanding of internet technology”, the letter states.

The signatories argued the consultation ahead of the proposed changes suffered from a lack of transparency, with millions of comments from the public seemingly ignored and the FCC’s comment system disrupted by botnets and an unexplained outage.

“Breaking with established practice, the FCC has not held a single open public meeting to hear from citizens and experts about the proposed Order,” the letter states.

collect
0
Christopher Johnson 2018-01-23
img

Every company has its own special lingo that doesn't make sense to outsiders.

Stan: In the Googleplex, you'll meet Stan, Google's own statue of a T. rex skeleton.

Pronounced "new-gler," these people are identifiable thanks to the Google-colored propeller caps they receive.

TGIF: It does mean "Thank God It's Friday," but it also is the name of the weekly all-hands meeting — confusingly, now held on Thursdays.

It's also where Nooglers receive their hats.

One of Google's most prominent Greyglers is its chief internet evangelist — and one of the fathers of the web — Vint Cerf.

collect
0
Juan Hackwell 2017-12-11
img

As the FCC vote to undo net neutrality requirements looms, some of technology’s greatest minds have come together to issue a plea to congressional leadership to save the internet as we know it.

Even though millions of letters from the general public were ignored, in a last ditch effort to preserve net neutrality, 21 high profile technologists have penned an open letter to the FCC.

Addressed to Marsha Senators Roger Wicker and Brian Shatz, along with members of Congress Marsha Blackburn and Michael Doyle, the letter carries the blunt title, “Internet Pioneers and Leaders Tell the FCC: You Don’t Understand How the Internet Works.”Overturn Net Neutrality?

The internet’s founders have a word on that…

Among the signees are Tim Berners-Lee, Vint Cerf and Steve Wozniak, along with fellow tech pioneers and top names from Mozilla, Betaworks, Internet Archive and Tufts.

The letters asks that the politicians call on Ajit Pai to cancel the planned December 14 “Restoring Internet Freedom Order” vote that looks to overturn Obama-era regulation that established net neutrality rules.

collect
0
Mark Maynard 2018-01-29
img

That book was published in 1949.

In 2013 Vint Cerf, who is considered as the father of the internet, said that “privacy may actually be an anomaly.” Throughout history, people preferred communal settings in just about anything — the concept of solitude and privacy was something limited to monasticism.

And with the rise of social media, that cycle means we are now moving again toward loss of privacy.

This includes photos, status updates, locations, all that while tagging friends who may not be aware they are being connected with photos, events, and places.

Given the amount of permissions we give social networks when we install apps on our mobile devices, we might as well just hand them over privileged access to our personal lives.

However, this does not preclude the fact that Facebook itself has admitted to using smartphones’ microphones whenever necessary.

collect
0
Benny Parkhurst 2018-06-22
img

The European Copyright Directive has been two years in the making, and on June 20, the European Parliament's legal affairs committee voted to approve the draft legislation.

The vote happened less than a month after Europe's last big piece of internet-related legislation -- the General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) -- kicked in.

Both the Copyright Directive and GDPR are EU laws that will dramatically impact and change things about the internet as we know it.

GDPR has forced internet companies to scramble to fall in line with the new policy, but the privacy protections it promises internet users mean it's generally thought of as a consumer-friendly effort.

Pirate Party MEP Julia Reda is suggesting alternatives to both Article 11 and Article 13.

For the most part this would mean filters that check content as it's uploaded would be mandatory for platforms including Facebook, Instagram, GitHub, Reddit and Tumblr, but also many much smaller platforms.

collect
0
Jonathan Spitzer 2016-06-03
img

The great grammatical argument of our age

While nerds have the pronunciation of "gif" to argue over, the rest of the world continues to battle over whether the word "internet" should be capitalized or not.

His reasoning is that there is a public Internet and a private internet – an internet that does not connect to the outside world but uses the same protocols.

The Oxford English Dictionary is taking a broader perspective on the issue.

It causes the reader to pause, albeit very lightly, and account for the fact that the word is somehow special and standalone and should not be confused with a generic word.

Examples

The truth is that each time in this story we have written the word Internet, it has caused you as the reader to note it.

Should it be LASER Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation or Laser?

collect
0
Jason Kowalski 2016-06-08
img

But what if we could create a decentralized web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?

Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.

The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.

Every discussion was focused on how to distribute, process, and host data with no centralized control.

Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.

Tim Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.

collect
0
Porter Johnson 2016-06-08
img

But what if we could create a decentralised web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?

Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.

The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.

During the summit, dozens of sessions were held about creating an internet with no central control.

Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.

Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.

collect
0
Daniel Slye 2019-01-20
img

Even though both shortcomings proved problematic, Cerf's not certain he would have fixed them if he had to do it all over again.

He's widely considered to be one of the fathers of the international network and helped officially launch it in 1983.

You might chalk up the lack of room on the internet, which was later corrected with a system-wide upgrade, to a lack of vision.

Read this:The 'father of the internet' says that Google employee backlash to its defense work was just 'a lot of misunderstanding'

The internet had a space problem

The lack of room on the internet has to do with the addressing system Cerf created for it.

collect
0
James Flachs 2019-03-12
img

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the British scientist working at CERN, the large particle physics laboratory near Geneva, invented something in the late 1980s that is still in use today.

The World Wide Web (WWW) officially celebrates its 30th birthday today, after its creation by Sir Tim to help scientists share information more easily.

And the rest as they say, is history.

Sir Tim first proposed the idea of a system which would turn into World Wide Web on 12 March 1989.

Remember, the Internet had already been invented by then, thanks to the likes of Vint Cerf and a few other people.

Indeed it is important to remember that the Internet and the World Wide Web are not the same thing.

collect
0
Steven Jones 2018-12-11
img

Inventor of the internet protocols TCP/IP Vint Cerf and inventor of the web Tim Berners-Lee have spent the past 20 years talking in pragmatic but highly optimistic tones about the global networks they helped give birth to.

"We may be building a fragile, brittle future," he warned the audience, asking: "What happens when we fail?"

Vice-chancellor of the UK's University of Southampton and practical optimist Wendy Hall despaired about "what is happening to our children and to ourselves."

All agree on one thing however: Right now there is a serious battle for heart and minds, the future of the internet and global society itself.

Every speaker noted competing visions from three main sources: The US, Europe and China.

Ives noted that the "Silicon Valley free for all" that the US represents – with limited or no regulation – is not doing so great.

collect
0
Anthony Couture 2018-06-10
img

In this weeks networking news, switches surged, Riverbed monitored and the MEF standardised

Roundup Last week saw celebration in the IPv6 community this week – not because adoption is finally really taking off, but because, umm, look, something must have happened, right?

The “IPv6 Launch Day” that happened on June 6, 2012, was a cross between official switch-on by a bunch of US service providers, and promotional exercise.

The fifth anniversary brought Vint Cerf out to grouch that the v6 rollout is still too slow, but others wanted to Look on the Bright Side of Life .

Facebook, for example, said its internal traffic is now past the half-way mark, and has launched a monitoring site based on its traffic observations.

The Social Network noted that US mobile carriers send more than 75 per cent of their traffic to Facebook over IPv6.

collect
0
Sean Biro 2016-07-14
img

A veritable Who's Who of the tech industry have signed an open letter aggressively criticizing Donald Trump and his proposed presidential policies.

"We are inventors, entrepreneurs, engineers, investors, researchers, and business leaders working in the technology sector," the letter begins.

"We are proud that American innovation is the envy of the world, a source of widely-shared prosperity, and a hallmark of our global leadership."

He campaigns on anger, bigotry, fear of new ideas and new people, and a fundamental belief that America is weak and in decline."

Among the 145 signatories – all signing "in a personal capacity" – are "Father of the internet" Vint Cerf, Woz, Wikipedia's Jimmy Wales, eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, several former and current Twitter execs and top executives from Slack, Yelp, Flickr, Qualcomm, Box, YouTube – even recent lawsuit recipient Shervin Pishevar of Hyperloop One, among many others.

It then runs through a roll-call of Trump's worst ideas: the building of a wall on the Mexican border; a ban on Muslims entering the country; deportations; profiling; shutting down parts of the internet, and so on.

collect
0
Angela Skipper 2018-03-21
img

Silicon Valley boffins bag Nobel Prize of computer science

The two engineers who further developed and popularized the concept of RISC microprocessors have won the 2017 ACM Turing Award.

Professors John Hennessy and David Patterson were today announced as this year's (or last year's, if you want to be particular about it) winners of the prestigious honor named after Brit mathematician and computer scientist Alan Turing.

Hennessy happens to be the executive chairman of Google parent Alphabet, and Patterson works on the Google Brain team, it must be said.

Of course, they earned the Turing gong.

No way, not when you consider their history.

collect
0
Debra Simonds 2018-06-06
img

Co-inventor of TCP/IP and so-called "Father of the Internet" Vint Cerf has urged network nerds to "get with the program" on World IPv6 Day.

In a video to celebrate six years since the creation of World IPv6 Launch, Cerf offers optimistic impatience with the rollout of the next-generation network addressing protocol.

He notes that not only did IPv4 address space run out in 2011 (sort of) but that internet engineers anticipated the problem back in 1996 and so developed IPv6 to allow the internet to continue expanding unhindered.

"It's certainly been a long time since the standards were put in place," Cerf reflected.

Although IPv6 is now available on roughly 22-25 per cent of the internet there is, he notes, "a long way to go to get to 100 per cent – which is where we need to be."

It's worth noting that if it wasn't for Vint Cerf, IPv4 address space would have run out much, much sooner.

Ryan Pak 2017-12-12
img

Vint Cerf, Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Steve Wozniak are amongst those calling for this week’s vote to be called off amidst a ‘lack of transparency’

Twenty-one figures who contributed to the early internet have asked the US Senate to block a planned vote this week by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that would repeal “network neutrality” regulations.

The signatories of the open letter, who include Vint Cerf, Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Steve Wozniak, said the FCC’s planned vote on Thursday would remove long-standing oversight over internet access providers “without an adequate replacement to protect consumers, free markets and online innovation”.

The FCC’s low-regulation approach is “based on a flawed and factually inaccurate understanding of internet technology”, the letter states.

The signatories argued the consultation ahead of the proposed changes suffered from a lack of transparency, with millions of comments from the public seemingly ignored and the FCC’s comment system disrupted by botnets and an unexplained outage.

“Breaking with established practice, the FCC has not held a single open public meeting to hear from citizens and experts about the proposed Order,” the letter states.

Juan Hackwell 2017-12-11
img

As the FCC vote to undo net neutrality requirements looms, some of technology’s greatest minds have come together to issue a plea to congressional leadership to save the internet as we know it.

Even though millions of letters from the general public were ignored, in a last ditch effort to preserve net neutrality, 21 high profile technologists have penned an open letter to the FCC.

Addressed to Marsha Senators Roger Wicker and Brian Shatz, along with members of Congress Marsha Blackburn and Michael Doyle, the letter carries the blunt title, “Internet Pioneers and Leaders Tell the FCC: You Don’t Understand How the Internet Works.”Overturn Net Neutrality?

The internet’s founders have a word on that…

Among the signees are Tim Berners-Lee, Vint Cerf and Steve Wozniak, along with fellow tech pioneers and top names from Mozilla, Betaworks, Internet Archive and Tufts.

The letters asks that the politicians call on Ajit Pai to cancel the planned December 14 “Restoring Internet Freedom Order” vote that looks to overturn Obama-era regulation that established net neutrality rules.

Benny Parkhurst 2018-06-22
img

The European Copyright Directive has been two years in the making, and on June 20, the European Parliament's legal affairs committee voted to approve the draft legislation.

The vote happened less than a month after Europe's last big piece of internet-related legislation -- the General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) -- kicked in.

Both the Copyright Directive and GDPR are EU laws that will dramatically impact and change things about the internet as we know it.

GDPR has forced internet companies to scramble to fall in line with the new policy, but the privacy protections it promises internet users mean it's generally thought of as a consumer-friendly effort.

Pirate Party MEP Julia Reda is suggesting alternatives to both Article 11 and Article 13.

For the most part this would mean filters that check content as it's uploaded would be mandatory for platforms including Facebook, Instagram, GitHub, Reddit and Tumblr, but also many much smaller platforms.

Jason Kowalski 2016-06-08
img

But what if we could create a decentralized web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?

Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.

The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.

Every discussion was focused on how to distribute, process, and host data with no centralized control.

Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.

Tim Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.

Daniel Slye 2019-01-20
img

Even though both shortcomings proved problematic, Cerf's not certain he would have fixed them if he had to do it all over again.

He's widely considered to be one of the fathers of the international network and helped officially launch it in 1983.

You might chalk up the lack of room on the internet, which was later corrected with a system-wide upgrade, to a lack of vision.

Read this:The 'father of the internet' says that Google employee backlash to its defense work was just 'a lot of misunderstanding'

The internet had a space problem

The lack of room on the internet has to do with the addressing system Cerf created for it.

Steven Jones 2018-12-11
img

Inventor of the internet protocols TCP/IP Vint Cerf and inventor of the web Tim Berners-Lee have spent the past 20 years talking in pragmatic but highly optimistic tones about the global networks they helped give birth to.

"We may be building a fragile, brittle future," he warned the audience, asking: "What happens when we fail?"

Vice-chancellor of the UK's University of Southampton and practical optimist Wendy Hall despaired about "what is happening to our children and to ourselves."

All agree on one thing however: Right now there is a serious battle for heart and minds, the future of the internet and global society itself.

Every speaker noted competing visions from three main sources: The US, Europe and China.

Ives noted that the "Silicon Valley free for all" that the US represents – with limited or no regulation – is not doing so great.

Sean Biro 2016-07-14
img

A veritable Who's Who of the tech industry have signed an open letter aggressively criticizing Donald Trump and his proposed presidential policies.

"We are inventors, entrepreneurs, engineers, investors, researchers, and business leaders working in the technology sector," the letter begins.

"We are proud that American innovation is the envy of the world, a source of widely-shared prosperity, and a hallmark of our global leadership."

He campaigns on anger, bigotry, fear of new ideas and new people, and a fundamental belief that America is weak and in decline."

Among the 145 signatories – all signing "in a personal capacity" – are "Father of the internet" Vint Cerf, Woz, Wikipedia's Jimmy Wales, eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, several former and current Twitter execs and top executives from Slack, Yelp, Flickr, Qualcomm, Box, YouTube – even recent lawsuit recipient Shervin Pishevar of Hyperloop One, among many others.

It then runs through a roll-call of Trump's worst ideas: the building of a wall on the Mexican border; a ban on Muslims entering the country; deportations; profiling; shutting down parts of the internet, and so on.

James Desmond 2018-12-05
img

Internet inventor Vint Cerf and David Nordfors, co-founder of the i4j, believe that it is artificial intelligence that can create our new jobs.

Now, there is an urgent need to be at least as good at creating new and better jobs instead of those who disappears.

We have found a new approach with two main components: to enhance people's economic value and create a more humane economy.

the Goal of innovation should be a sustainable economy where we work with those we like, valued by society and have a good home with near and dear ones.

despite the fact that information technology and artificial intelligence, ai, increases our innovative power enormously, we seem to still not be closer to the goal, on the contrary, spreads the fear of losing jobs to machines.

the Right question is: How can we use the new technology to create better job?

Christopher Johnson 2018-01-23
img

Every company has its own special lingo that doesn't make sense to outsiders.

Stan: In the Googleplex, you'll meet Stan, Google's own statue of a T. rex skeleton.

Pronounced "new-gler," these people are identifiable thanks to the Google-colored propeller caps they receive.

TGIF: It does mean "Thank God It's Friday," but it also is the name of the weekly all-hands meeting — confusingly, now held on Thursdays.

It's also where Nooglers receive their hats.

One of Google's most prominent Greyglers is its chief internet evangelist — and one of the fathers of the web — Vint Cerf.

Mark Maynard 2018-01-29
img

That book was published in 1949.

In 2013 Vint Cerf, who is considered as the father of the internet, said that “privacy may actually be an anomaly.” Throughout history, people preferred communal settings in just about anything — the concept of solitude and privacy was something limited to monasticism.

And with the rise of social media, that cycle means we are now moving again toward loss of privacy.

This includes photos, status updates, locations, all that while tagging friends who may not be aware they are being connected with photos, events, and places.

Given the amount of permissions we give social networks when we install apps on our mobile devices, we might as well just hand them over privileged access to our personal lives.

However, this does not preclude the fact that Facebook itself has admitted to using smartphones’ microphones whenever necessary.

Jonathan Spitzer 2016-06-03
img

The great grammatical argument of our age

While nerds have the pronunciation of "gif" to argue over, the rest of the world continues to battle over whether the word "internet" should be capitalized or not.

His reasoning is that there is a public Internet and a private internet – an internet that does not connect to the outside world but uses the same protocols.

The Oxford English Dictionary is taking a broader perspective on the issue.

It causes the reader to pause, albeit very lightly, and account for the fact that the word is somehow special and standalone and should not be confused with a generic word.

Examples

The truth is that each time in this story we have written the word Internet, it has caused you as the reader to note it.

Should it be LASER Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation or Laser?

Porter Johnson 2016-06-08
img

But what if we could create a decentralised web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?

Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.

The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.

During the summit, dozens of sessions were held about creating an internet with no central control.

Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.

Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.

James Flachs 2019-03-12
img

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the British scientist working at CERN, the large particle physics laboratory near Geneva, invented something in the late 1980s that is still in use today.

The World Wide Web (WWW) officially celebrates its 30th birthday today, after its creation by Sir Tim to help scientists share information more easily.

And the rest as they say, is history.

Sir Tim first proposed the idea of a system which would turn into World Wide Web on 12 March 1989.

Remember, the Internet had already been invented by then, thanks to the likes of Vint Cerf and a few other people.

Indeed it is important to remember that the Internet and the World Wide Web are not the same thing.

Anthony Couture 2018-06-10
img

In this weeks networking news, switches surged, Riverbed monitored and the MEF standardised

Roundup Last week saw celebration in the IPv6 community this week – not because adoption is finally really taking off, but because, umm, look, something must have happened, right?

The “IPv6 Launch Day” that happened on June 6, 2012, was a cross between official switch-on by a bunch of US service providers, and promotional exercise.

The fifth anniversary brought Vint Cerf out to grouch that the v6 rollout is still too slow, but others wanted to Look on the Bright Side of Life .

Facebook, for example, said its internal traffic is now past the half-way mark, and has launched a monitoring site based on its traffic observations.

The Social Network noted that US mobile carriers send more than 75 per cent of their traffic to Facebook over IPv6.

Angela Skipper 2018-03-21
img

Silicon Valley boffins bag Nobel Prize of computer science

The two engineers who further developed and popularized the concept of RISC microprocessors have won the 2017 ACM Turing Award.

Professors John Hennessy and David Patterson were today announced as this year's (or last year's, if you want to be particular about it) winners of the prestigious honor named after Brit mathematician and computer scientist Alan Turing.

Hennessy happens to be the executive chairman of Google parent Alphabet, and Patterson works on the Google Brain team, it must be said.

Of course, they earned the Turing gong.

No way, not when you consider their history.