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David Bierman 2016-11-05
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For 10 years, a weather satellite named GOES-East has been flying 22,300 miles above Earth staring at the eastern half of the United States down to South America at snow storms and hurricanes, sending information to the ground for meteorologists to build their forecasts.

It s watched big storms like Hurricane Sandy shut down the mid-Atlantic region and Washington, D.C. s, Snowzilla shut down the federal government.

It also watched Hurricane Matthew recently threaten its new sibling, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R GOES-R , in a Florida storage facility.

Mashable noted: Lying directly in the path of fearsome Hurricane Matthew ... is America s next-generation, $1.2 billion weather satellite.

The Washington Post s Capital Weather Gang: GOES-R, our next-gen weather satellite, is delayed by a hurricane.

The new weather satellite is such big news that NBC s Al Roker filmed a segment for Today touting its benefits.

collect
0
Charles Gilbert 2018-05-23
img

NOAA has revealed that the Advanced Baseline Imager instrument on a newly launched satellite has been experiencing an issue that they’ve narrowed down to a cooling problem.

The issue impacts GOES-17, a satellite launched on March 1, and is an unfortunate turn of events.

The previous satellite, GOES-16, didn’t experience the same issue and continues to operate properly.

NOAA revealed the issue in a brief statement today, explaining that the other geostationary satellites — GOES-14, GOES-15, and GOES-16 — are operating according to plan.

However, the cooling system on GOES-17 is malfunctioning, leaving the instrument vulnerable to solar radiation and excessive heat.

The agency says the cooling system is “an integral part” of the Advanced Baseline Imager.

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0
Joan Zappulla 2016-11-20
img

This photo provided by United Launch Alliance shows a United Launch Alliance ULA Atlas V rocket carrying GOES-R spacecraft for NASA and NOAA lifting off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 6:42 p.m.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla – The most advanced weather satellite ever built rocketed into space Saturday night, part of an $11 billion effort to revolutionize forecasting and save lives.

This new GOES-R spacecraft will track U.S. weather as never before: hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding, volcanic ash clouds, wildfires, lightning storms, even solar flares.

Indeed, about 50 TV meteorologists from around the country converged on the launch site — including NBC's Al Roker — along with 8,000 space program workers and guests.

"What's so exciting is that we're going to be getting more data, more often, much more detailed, higher resolution," Roker said.

"Really a quantum leap above any satellite NOAA has ever flown," said Stephen Volz, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's director of satellites.

collect
0
Joseph Cormier 2017-11-28
img

Launch blunder not the best start for Putin's new spaceport

A Russian weather satellite and 18 micro-satellites are right now thought to be at the bottom of the Atlantic ocean after a Soyuz rocket carrying the birds malfunctioned shortly after launch.

The launch of the Soyuz 2-b rocket – the latest addition to Russia's venerable line of boosters – took place at the new Vostochny cosmodrome today, and initially appeared to go without a mishap.

The thing isn't where it's supposed to be at all, which isn't a particularly good sign.

Here's a video of the liftoff:

"During the first planned communication session with the spacecraft, it was not possible to establish a connection due to its absence in the target orbit," said Roscosmos in a statement.

collect
0
Jeff Lusk 2018-05-23
img

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released some bad news today: the GOES-17 weather satellite that launched almost two months ago has a cooling problem that could endanger the majority of the satellite’s value.

GOES-17 is the second of a new generation of weather satellite to join NOAA’s orbital fleet.

Its predecessor is covering the US East Coast, with GOES-17 meant to become “GOES-West.” While providing higher-resolution images of atmospheric conditions, it also tracks fires, lightning strikes, and solar behavior.

It’s important that NOAA stays ahead of the loss of dying satellites by launching new satellites that ensure no gap in global coverage ever occurs.

The various instruments onboard the satellite have been put through their paces to make sure everything is working properly before it goes into official operation.

Several weeks ago, it became clear that the most important instrument—the Advanced Baseline Imager—had a cooling problem.

collect
0
Adolfo Lorenzo 2016-11-21

A new weather satellite that could help pilots avoid turbulence has launched into space.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA said it would beam clearer images of cloud "waves", which contribute to turbulence, back to earth more quickly.

It is also set to give better estimates of wind speed, fog, ice and lightning.

Pilots have welcomed the advances, which are expected to be available from the second half of 2017.

GOES-R Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite is billed as the world's most advanced weather satellite.

It also claims to pick up on hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding, volcanic ash clouds, wildfires, lightning storms and solar flares more quickly.

collect
0
Albert Hummel 2016-11-18
img

At 5:42pm ET Saturday, the United Launch Alliance will blast the GOES-R satellite into space for NOAA.

This new instrument will provide real-time data and images to aid in the forecasting various types of weather, from hurricanes on Earth to solar storms.

NASA TV will provide live coverage beginning at 5:10pm ET.

All manner of superlatives have been applied to this first of a new generation of weather satellites—fastest, best, clearest—in terms of data and images beamed back to Earth.

Mission scientists say GOES-R bridges the divide from an era when most people got their weather information at 10 from a TV personality to when everyone carries a 10-day forecast in their pocket.

Or, they say, it is like going from black-and-white television to high-definition.

collect
0
Cedric Sams 2016-11-21

GOES-R is on its way to a geostationary orbit 22,300 miles above the Earth.

In two weeks, it ll reach its destination, becoming the first of a new generation of Earth-observing spacecraft that will extend NOAA s ability to monitor weather in the western hemisphere out to the year 2036.

Capable of scanning the planet five times faster, at four times the spatial resolution, and in three times more spectral bands than current geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R is going to be a game changer for forecasting.

The newly-launched GOES-R satellite offers much higher-resolution imaging capabilities.

NOAA s current GOES satellites were built with 1990s hardware, and if you want an analogy for the technological leap GOES-R represents, just think about your first computer 20 years ago compared with what s sitting on your desk today.

The Advanced Baseline Imager ABI , GOES-R s primary weather-monitoring instrument suite, is speedier, higher resolution, and overall far more capable than its predecessors.

collect
0
Harvey Ayers 2016-11-21

GOES-R is on its way to a geostationary orbit 22,300 miles above the Earth.

In two weeks, it ll reach its destination, becoming the first of a new generation of Earth-observing spacecraft that will extend NOAA s ability to monitor weather in the western hemisphere out to the year 2036.

Capable of scanning the planet five times faster, at four times the spatial resolution, and in three times more spectral bands than current geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R is going to be a game changer for forecasting.

The newly-launched GOES-R satellite offers much higher-resolution imaging capabilities.

NOAA s current GOES satellites were built with 1990s hardware, and if you want an analogy for the technological leap GOES-R represents, just think about your first computer 20 years ago compared with what s sitting on your desk today.

The Advanced Baseline Imager ABI , GOES-R s primary weather-monitoring instrument suite, is speedier, higher resolution, and overall far more capable than its predecessors.

collect
0
Joseph Averitt 2017-11-27
img

When broken down by country, the results show that in many developing nations, the increases in artificial lighting are well above the global average, as more people gain access to electricity and outdoor lighting equipment for highways, city centers and residential areas.

[Photos: Light Pollution Around the World]

But even in many developed nations, the output of artificial light may be increasing as well, despite some regional efforts to curb it, the study shows.

The data for the new study comes from the Suomi NPP satellite, which was designed as an operational testbed for critical hardware components that will go on a next-generation series of weather satellites from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The first of those satellites launched into space this month .

One of the instruments aboard Suomi NPP is called the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite , which includes a sensor called the Day/Night Band (DNB).

collect
0
Charles Pete 2019-06-26
img

The dispute is over the 1675-1680MHz frequencies and is separate from the other FCC/weather controversy we've been covering, which involves the 24GHz band and has pitted the FCC against NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the US Navy.

Ajit Pai says NOAA and NASA are wrong about 5G harming weather forecasts

The American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Meteorological Society (AMS), and National Weather Association (NWA) told the FCC in a filing last week that its plan for 1675-1680MHz should be scrapped because of the "likelihood of interference with the reception of weather satellite imagery and relayed environmental data to receive-only antennas that members of America's weather, water, and climate enterprise use."

Ligado claims there's no reason to be concerned about interference with weather-satellite data transmissions.

Separately, Ligado this week also asked the FCC to rule on its December 2015 application for a license modification that would allow it to use the 1526-1536MHz band with limits on power levels to protect GPS devices.

Boeing and AccuWeather raise concerns

collect
0
Jeff Lusk 2017-03-31
img

Crisp images coming from the newest addition to NOAA's family of weather-observing satellites are a stunning example of the beauty of our world and how far technology has advanced over the past couple of decades.

The federal agency of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) line of satellites in November 2016, and we started getting regular images from the new satellite earlier this year.

Two of the most noticeable differences between GOES-16 and its predecessors is how much clearer the pictures are and how much faster we get them compared to the satellites in operational use now.

The new satellite gives us a look at the United States every five minutes, and it'll give us one of those full-disk views every 15 minutes.

This is a major step-up from how frequently the current generation of satellites transmits images, which is every 15 minutes for the U.S. and every three hours for the entire hemisphere.

The high-resolution images that update once or twice a minute show thunderstorms bubbling over land and sea smoother than a pot of boiling water.

collect
0
Rodney Edson 2017-11-19
img

NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration launched the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, the first in a “series of four highly advanced polar-orbiting satellites,” NASA announced on Saturday, with the agencies touting they expect significant improvements to their weather-forecasting abilities when JPSS-1 comes online in three months.

@NOAASatellites’ JPSS1 weather satellite launches at 4:47am ET, heading into polar orbit around Earth: https://t.co/ZuxLDtzW9c pic.twitter.com/CVIjghTd7t

“Emergency managers increasingly rely on our forecasts to make critical decisions and take appropriate action before a storm hits,” NOAA National Weather Service director Louis W. Uccellini wrote in the statement.

“Polar satellite observations not only help us monitor and collect information about current weather systems, but they provide data to feed into our weather forecast models.”

JPSS-1 is 14.8 feet in diameter and weighs 5,060 pounds, and was one of the last NASA satellites scheduled to be powered into orbit by the Delta II rocket system.

It will circle the Earth approximately 14 times a day at an elevation of 512 miles.

collect
0
Eric Erikson 2018-09-26
img

Storms, it seems, are getting bigger, but the tools that track them are getting smaller.

NASA is testing tiny satellites about the size of a shoebox to monitor global storms, and it's seeing promising early results.

With the RainCube (Radar in a CubeSat), NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory wants to see whether smaller satellites can deliver more comprehensive weather data faster, and at a lower cost.

The idea is that mini-satellites that fly together like geese can give more frequent real-time looks inside storms, and thus track the movement of rain, snow, sleet and hail more accurately.

"We actually will end up doing much more interesting insightful science with a constellation rather than with just one of them," Graeme Stephens, director of the Center for Climate Sciences at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.

"What we're learning in Earth sciences is that space and time coverage is more important than having a really expensive satellite instrument that just does one thing."

collect
0
Keith Brewton 2016-11-21

NASA has announced a successful launch of a highly advanced National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA weather satellite.

The satellite is called the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R or GOES-R.

The launch happened at 6:42 p.m. EST on November 19 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The GOES-R satellite will boost the nation s weather observation capability allowing more accurate and timely weather forecasts, watches, and warnings.

The launch of GOES-R represents a major step forward in terms of our ability to provide more timely and accurate information that is critical for life-saving weather forecasts and warnings, said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

It also continues a decades-long partnership between NASA and NOAA to successfully build and launch geostationary environmental satellites.

collect
0
Seth Logan 2016-11-18
img

NASA 90% certain of lift-off on Saturday

NASA meteorologists have given a 90 per cent chance of good weather for the launch of the revolutionary Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series GOES‑R on Saturday.

GOES-R is possibly the most advanced weather satellite ever produced, capable of providing high-definition, multi-spectrum snapshots of weather systems every 30 seconds, as well as keeping an eye on the Sun to spot solar flares that could be heading our way.

The one-hour launch window begins at 1742 EST 2242 GMT for the Atlas V 541 rocket.

Positioned over 22,000 miles above the Earth, GOES‑R will take weather observation to new heights.

GOES‑R will be in a geo-stationary orbit looking down on the Americas, and will provide a detailed view of some of the world s most dramatic weather in near-real time, said Dr Simon Keogh, head of the UK Met Office satellite team.

collect
0
David Bierman 2016-11-05
img

For 10 years, a weather satellite named GOES-East has been flying 22,300 miles above Earth staring at the eastern half of the United States down to South America at snow storms and hurricanes, sending information to the ground for meteorologists to build their forecasts.

It s watched big storms like Hurricane Sandy shut down the mid-Atlantic region and Washington, D.C. s, Snowzilla shut down the federal government.

It also watched Hurricane Matthew recently threaten its new sibling, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R GOES-R , in a Florida storage facility.

Mashable noted: Lying directly in the path of fearsome Hurricane Matthew ... is America s next-generation, $1.2 billion weather satellite.

The Washington Post s Capital Weather Gang: GOES-R, our next-gen weather satellite, is delayed by a hurricane.

The new weather satellite is such big news that NBC s Al Roker filmed a segment for Today touting its benefits.

Joan Zappulla 2016-11-20
img

This photo provided by United Launch Alliance shows a United Launch Alliance ULA Atlas V rocket carrying GOES-R spacecraft for NASA and NOAA lifting off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 6:42 p.m.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla – The most advanced weather satellite ever built rocketed into space Saturday night, part of an $11 billion effort to revolutionize forecasting and save lives.

This new GOES-R spacecraft will track U.S. weather as never before: hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding, volcanic ash clouds, wildfires, lightning storms, even solar flares.

Indeed, about 50 TV meteorologists from around the country converged on the launch site — including NBC's Al Roker — along with 8,000 space program workers and guests.

"What's so exciting is that we're going to be getting more data, more often, much more detailed, higher resolution," Roker said.

"Really a quantum leap above any satellite NOAA has ever flown," said Stephen Volz, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's director of satellites.

Jeff Lusk 2018-05-23
img

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released some bad news today: the GOES-17 weather satellite that launched almost two months ago has a cooling problem that could endanger the majority of the satellite’s value.

GOES-17 is the second of a new generation of weather satellite to join NOAA’s orbital fleet.

Its predecessor is covering the US East Coast, with GOES-17 meant to become “GOES-West.” While providing higher-resolution images of atmospheric conditions, it also tracks fires, lightning strikes, and solar behavior.

It’s important that NOAA stays ahead of the loss of dying satellites by launching new satellites that ensure no gap in global coverage ever occurs.

The various instruments onboard the satellite have been put through their paces to make sure everything is working properly before it goes into official operation.

Several weeks ago, it became clear that the most important instrument—the Advanced Baseline Imager—had a cooling problem.

Albert Hummel 2016-11-18
img

At 5:42pm ET Saturday, the United Launch Alliance will blast the GOES-R satellite into space for NOAA.

This new instrument will provide real-time data and images to aid in the forecasting various types of weather, from hurricanes on Earth to solar storms.

NASA TV will provide live coverage beginning at 5:10pm ET.

All manner of superlatives have been applied to this first of a new generation of weather satellites—fastest, best, clearest—in terms of data and images beamed back to Earth.

Mission scientists say GOES-R bridges the divide from an era when most people got their weather information at 10 from a TV personality to when everyone carries a 10-day forecast in their pocket.

Or, they say, it is like going from black-and-white television to high-definition.

Harvey Ayers 2016-11-21

GOES-R is on its way to a geostationary orbit 22,300 miles above the Earth.

In two weeks, it ll reach its destination, becoming the first of a new generation of Earth-observing spacecraft that will extend NOAA s ability to monitor weather in the western hemisphere out to the year 2036.

Capable of scanning the planet five times faster, at four times the spatial resolution, and in three times more spectral bands than current geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R is going to be a game changer for forecasting.

The newly-launched GOES-R satellite offers much higher-resolution imaging capabilities.

NOAA s current GOES satellites were built with 1990s hardware, and if you want an analogy for the technological leap GOES-R represents, just think about your first computer 20 years ago compared with what s sitting on your desk today.

The Advanced Baseline Imager ABI , GOES-R s primary weather-monitoring instrument suite, is speedier, higher resolution, and overall far more capable than its predecessors.

Charles Pete 2019-06-26
img

The dispute is over the 1675-1680MHz frequencies and is separate from the other FCC/weather controversy we've been covering, which involves the 24GHz band and has pitted the FCC against NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the US Navy.

Ajit Pai says NOAA and NASA are wrong about 5G harming weather forecasts

The American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Meteorological Society (AMS), and National Weather Association (NWA) told the FCC in a filing last week that its plan for 1675-1680MHz should be scrapped because of the "likelihood of interference with the reception of weather satellite imagery and relayed environmental data to receive-only antennas that members of America's weather, water, and climate enterprise use."

Ligado claims there's no reason to be concerned about interference with weather-satellite data transmissions.

Separately, Ligado this week also asked the FCC to rule on its December 2015 application for a license modification that would allow it to use the 1526-1536MHz band with limits on power levels to protect GPS devices.

Boeing and AccuWeather raise concerns

Rodney Edson 2017-11-19
img

NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration launched the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, the first in a “series of four highly advanced polar-orbiting satellites,” NASA announced on Saturday, with the agencies touting they expect significant improvements to their weather-forecasting abilities when JPSS-1 comes online in three months.

@NOAASatellites’ JPSS1 weather satellite launches at 4:47am ET, heading into polar orbit around Earth: https://t.co/ZuxLDtzW9c pic.twitter.com/CVIjghTd7t

“Emergency managers increasingly rely on our forecasts to make critical decisions and take appropriate action before a storm hits,” NOAA National Weather Service director Louis W. Uccellini wrote in the statement.

“Polar satellite observations not only help us monitor and collect information about current weather systems, but they provide data to feed into our weather forecast models.”

JPSS-1 is 14.8 feet in diameter and weighs 5,060 pounds, and was one of the last NASA satellites scheduled to be powered into orbit by the Delta II rocket system.

It will circle the Earth approximately 14 times a day at an elevation of 512 miles.

Keith Brewton 2016-11-21

NASA has announced a successful launch of a highly advanced National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA weather satellite.

The satellite is called the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R or GOES-R.

The launch happened at 6:42 p.m. EST on November 19 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The GOES-R satellite will boost the nation s weather observation capability allowing more accurate and timely weather forecasts, watches, and warnings.

The launch of GOES-R represents a major step forward in terms of our ability to provide more timely and accurate information that is critical for life-saving weather forecasts and warnings, said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

It also continues a decades-long partnership between NASA and NOAA to successfully build and launch geostationary environmental satellites.

Charles Gilbert 2018-05-23
img

NOAA has revealed that the Advanced Baseline Imager instrument on a newly launched satellite has been experiencing an issue that they’ve narrowed down to a cooling problem.

The issue impacts GOES-17, a satellite launched on March 1, and is an unfortunate turn of events.

The previous satellite, GOES-16, didn’t experience the same issue and continues to operate properly.

NOAA revealed the issue in a brief statement today, explaining that the other geostationary satellites — GOES-14, GOES-15, and GOES-16 — are operating according to plan.

However, the cooling system on GOES-17 is malfunctioning, leaving the instrument vulnerable to solar radiation and excessive heat.

The agency says the cooling system is “an integral part” of the Advanced Baseline Imager.

Joseph Cormier 2017-11-28
img

Launch blunder not the best start for Putin's new spaceport

A Russian weather satellite and 18 micro-satellites are right now thought to be at the bottom of the Atlantic ocean after a Soyuz rocket carrying the birds malfunctioned shortly after launch.

The launch of the Soyuz 2-b rocket – the latest addition to Russia's venerable line of boosters – took place at the new Vostochny cosmodrome today, and initially appeared to go without a mishap.

The thing isn't where it's supposed to be at all, which isn't a particularly good sign.

Here's a video of the liftoff:

"During the first planned communication session with the spacecraft, it was not possible to establish a connection due to its absence in the target orbit," said Roscosmos in a statement.

Adolfo Lorenzo 2016-11-21

A new weather satellite that could help pilots avoid turbulence has launched into space.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA said it would beam clearer images of cloud "waves", which contribute to turbulence, back to earth more quickly.

It is also set to give better estimates of wind speed, fog, ice and lightning.

Pilots have welcomed the advances, which are expected to be available from the second half of 2017.

GOES-R Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite is billed as the world's most advanced weather satellite.

It also claims to pick up on hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding, volcanic ash clouds, wildfires, lightning storms and solar flares more quickly.

Cedric Sams 2016-11-21

GOES-R is on its way to a geostationary orbit 22,300 miles above the Earth.

In two weeks, it ll reach its destination, becoming the first of a new generation of Earth-observing spacecraft that will extend NOAA s ability to monitor weather in the western hemisphere out to the year 2036.

Capable of scanning the planet five times faster, at four times the spatial resolution, and in three times more spectral bands than current geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R is going to be a game changer for forecasting.

The newly-launched GOES-R satellite offers much higher-resolution imaging capabilities.

NOAA s current GOES satellites were built with 1990s hardware, and if you want an analogy for the technological leap GOES-R represents, just think about your first computer 20 years ago compared with what s sitting on your desk today.

The Advanced Baseline Imager ABI , GOES-R s primary weather-monitoring instrument suite, is speedier, higher resolution, and overall far more capable than its predecessors.

Joseph Averitt 2017-11-27
img

When broken down by country, the results show that in many developing nations, the increases in artificial lighting are well above the global average, as more people gain access to electricity and outdoor lighting equipment for highways, city centers and residential areas.

[Photos: Light Pollution Around the World]

But even in many developed nations, the output of artificial light may be increasing as well, despite some regional efforts to curb it, the study shows.

The data for the new study comes from the Suomi NPP satellite, which was designed as an operational testbed for critical hardware components that will go on a next-generation series of weather satellites from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The first of those satellites launched into space this month .

One of the instruments aboard Suomi NPP is called the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite , which includes a sensor called the Day/Night Band (DNB).

Jeff Lusk 2017-03-31
img

Crisp images coming from the newest addition to NOAA's family of weather-observing satellites are a stunning example of the beauty of our world and how far technology has advanced over the past couple of decades.

The federal agency of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) line of satellites in November 2016, and we started getting regular images from the new satellite earlier this year.

Two of the most noticeable differences between GOES-16 and its predecessors is how much clearer the pictures are and how much faster we get them compared to the satellites in operational use now.

The new satellite gives us a look at the United States every five minutes, and it'll give us one of those full-disk views every 15 minutes.

This is a major step-up from how frequently the current generation of satellites transmits images, which is every 15 minutes for the U.S. and every three hours for the entire hemisphere.

The high-resolution images that update once or twice a minute show thunderstorms bubbling over land and sea smoother than a pot of boiling water.

Eric Erikson 2018-09-26
img

Storms, it seems, are getting bigger, but the tools that track them are getting smaller.

NASA is testing tiny satellites about the size of a shoebox to monitor global storms, and it's seeing promising early results.

With the RainCube (Radar in a CubeSat), NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory wants to see whether smaller satellites can deliver more comprehensive weather data faster, and at a lower cost.

The idea is that mini-satellites that fly together like geese can give more frequent real-time looks inside storms, and thus track the movement of rain, snow, sleet and hail more accurately.

"We actually will end up doing much more interesting insightful science with a constellation rather than with just one of them," Graeme Stephens, director of the Center for Climate Sciences at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.

"What we're learning in Earth sciences is that space and time coverage is more important than having a really expensive satellite instrument that just does one thing."

Seth Logan 2016-11-18
img

NASA 90% certain of lift-off on Saturday

NASA meteorologists have given a 90 per cent chance of good weather for the launch of the revolutionary Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R Series GOES‑R on Saturday.

GOES-R is possibly the most advanced weather satellite ever produced, capable of providing high-definition, multi-spectrum snapshots of weather systems every 30 seconds, as well as keeping an eye on the Sun to spot solar flares that could be heading our way.

The one-hour launch window begins at 1742 EST 2242 GMT for the Atlas V 541 rocket.

Positioned over 22,000 miles above the Earth, GOES‑R will take weather observation to new heights.

GOES‑R will be in a geo-stationary orbit looking down on the Americas, and will provide a detailed view of some of the world s most dramatic weather in near-real time, said Dr Simon Keogh, head of the UK Met Office satellite team.