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Pradeep Zende 2019-04-29
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Food Antimicrobial Coating Market is rapidly growing in Asia Pacific Region.

The Food Antimicrobial Coating Market is rapidly increasing over the past few years mainly due to the burgeoning food and beverages industry.

Moreover, the consumer preference for good quality and standardized food products with extended durability escalate the market on the global platform.

The apparent beneficial applications of these coatings are vessels used in hygiene conscious environments like restaurants, medical care facilities, and schools among others.

Improved standards of living led by the improved economic conditions, worldwide that are allowing substantial investments in health and physical well being are likely to continue in the future fueling the demand for food antimicrobial coating.

Get a Free Smaple Now

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tanay tiwari 2019-08-22
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Antimicrobial Textiles - MARKET ADVISORY SERVICES

Antimicrobial Textiles report studies the global market size of it, especially focuses on the key regions like United States, European Union, China, and other regions (Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia).This study presents the Antimicrobial Textiles production, revenue, market share and growth rate for each key company, and also covers the breakdown data (production, consumption, revenue and market share) by regions, type and applications.

history breakdown data from 2014 to 2019, and forecast to 2025.

The antimicrobial textiles market is expected to reach USD 1,076.1 Million by 2026, with a CAGR of 7.51% during forecast period 2016 to 2026.

In this report, 2018 has been considered as the base year and 2019 to 2025 as the forecast period to estimate the market size for Antimicrobial Textiles.For top companies in United States, European Union and China, this report investigates and analyzes the production, value, price, market share and growth rate for the top manufacturers, key data from 2014 to 2019.

In global market, the following companies Of Antimicrobial Textiles are covered:

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0
help flypped 2019-10-07
img

Keeping fit is the most important aspect of our life as it reflects a pleasing personality and also increases work efficiency.

Amazingly, this simple mixture has remarkable weight loss benefits.

It helps one to lose weight in a very simple way, and the best part is that it helps one to melt belly fat fast.

According to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, honey curbs appetite.

Consuming honey precisely before bedtime can help one burn more calories during the early hours of sleep.

This ingredient is enriched with essential vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats as well.

collect
0
Manuel Darcangelo 2019-04-02
img

However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of new-to-nature antibiotics.

Molecular biologists from the University of Groningen and their colleagues in Switzerland and Germany have now developed a pipeline to create and screen large numbers of new lantibiotic peptides.

A description of the method and the first results were published on 1 April in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.

Lantibiotic peptides are modified after they are produced by ribosomes.

Enzymes can link different amino acids within the peptide chain to form rings.

'We know that a selection of 12 natural lantibiotics all have different combinations.'

collect
0
Joseph White 2019-04-23
img

Japanese scientists including researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) and Yokohama National University have identified the molecular mechanism that gives the skin secretions of a species of frog effective antimicrobial properties.

The Bombina variegata frog, also known as Yellow Bellied Toad, inhabits the forests, grasslands, wetland, and aquatic habitats across Central Europe.

They have attracted attention for their ability to inhibit Leishmaniasis -- a highly infectious and potentially fatal tropical disease that has affected an estimated 20 million people worldwide, with 1.3 million new cases and 20,000 to 30,000 deaths reported each year.

H4 is an isomer of H2 - they share the same formula but the atoms in the molecule are arranged differently - with H4 having a naturally occuring D-amino acid at the end of the molecular chain.

In terms of its antimicrobial properties, H4 is more potent than H2, but until now, the reason has remained an unsolved biological mystery.

The role of having D-amino acids is not fully understood in case of the frog."

collect
0
James Lamb 2019-07-22
img

University of Illinois Professor Nenad Miljkovic and his research group at Illinois have collaborated with John Boos & Co. to validate the antimicrobial efficacy of the company's proprietary cutting boards and companion board oil and cream.

Miljkovic tested the antimicrobial characteristics of the Effingham, Illinois-based company's USA-grown Northern Hard Rock Maple cutting boards, validating their ability to kill bacteria.

Additionally, data gathered by his team concluded that application of the John Boos Mystery Oil and Boos Block Board Cream on the boards created an antimicrobial, hydrophobic surface that decreased the surface bacteria to a clean level after three hours.

The study helped prove this particular cutting board is a safer, cleaner alternative to other boards currently on the market.

Miljkovic and his group in the Energy Transport Research Laboratory have extensive knowledge in the area of nanoengineered surfaces and coating technologies.

"We've been working on developing micro and nanostructured surfaces with antimicrobial function for the past four years as part of a separate collaboration with the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) and the Department of Entomology at Illinois.

collect
0
Janet Gaines 2019-08-01
img

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that an elastic polymer possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes - including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

"We were exploring a different approach for creating antimicrobial materials when we observed some interesting behavior from this polymer and decided to explore its potential in greater depth," says Rich Spontak, co-corresponding author of a paper on the work and Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State.

"And what we found is extremely promising as an alternate weapon to existing materials-related approaches in the fight against drug-resistant pathogens.

This could be particularly useful in clinical settings - such as hospitals or doctor's offices - as well as senior-living facilities, where pathogen transmission can have dire consequences."

"When microbes come into contact with the polymer, water on the surface of the microbes interacts with the sulfonic acid functional groups in the polymer - creating an acidic solution that quickly kills the bacteria," says Reza Ghiladi, an associate professor of chemistry at NC State and co-corresponding author of the paper.

"These acidic solutions can be made more or less powerful by controlling the number of sulfonic acid functional groups in the polymer."

collect
0
Robert Holloway 2019-03-12
img

University of Groningen microbiologists and their colleagues from Lithuania have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures.

They also succeeded in transferring the genes required to produce this glycocin to an E. coli bacterium.

These findings were published in Nature Communications on 7 March.

The rise of antibiotic resistance has spurred the search for new antimicrobials.

Bacteriocins - peptide toxins produced by bacteria to inhibit growth in similar or related bacterial strains - are a possible alternative to the more traditional antibiotics.

'That is why we were interested to find that the thermophilic bacterium Aeribacillus palladius, isolated from the soil above an oil well in Lithuania, appeared to produce an antibacterial peptide,' says University of Groningen Professor of Molecular Biology, Oscar Kuipers.

collect
0
Frederick Jones 2019-04-18
img

EVANSTON, Ill. -- Antimicrobial paints offer the promise of extra protection against bacteria.

But Northwestern University researchers caution that these paints might be doing more harm than good.

In a new study, the researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints.

Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.

Most bacilli are commonly inhabit soil, but many are found in indoor environments.

"Bacillus is typically innocuous, but by attacking it, you might prompt it to develop more antibiotic resistance."

collect
0
James Neely 2019-06-24
img

The University of Liverpool (UoL) and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have been awarded £3.54m for a research project that aims to develop a 'personalised health' approach to prevent and treat antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Resistance to all antimicrobials, and especially bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics, is increasing.

It is now posing a serious threat to health both in the UK and globally, and risks undermining the major improvements in medicine that have been made in recent decades.

This new project will focus on personalised antimicrobial therapy as a way to prevent and treat AMR.

The funding will enable equipment to be purchased for real time measurement of drug concentrations in patients, rapid sequencing of bacteria from patients, performing pharmacogenetic analyses and real time pharmacodynamic analyses.

These approaches will be unified using artificial intelligence and deep learning in collaboration with the University of Liverpool's Department of Computer Science.

collect
0
Pradeep Zende 2019-04-29
img

Food Antimicrobial Coating Market is rapidly growing in Asia Pacific Region.

The Food Antimicrobial Coating Market is rapidly increasing over the past few years mainly due to the burgeoning food and beverages industry.

Moreover, the consumer preference for good quality and standardized food products with extended durability escalate the market on the global platform.

The apparent beneficial applications of these coatings are vessels used in hygiene conscious environments like restaurants, medical care facilities, and schools among others.

Improved standards of living led by the improved economic conditions, worldwide that are allowing substantial investments in health and physical well being are likely to continue in the future fueling the demand for food antimicrobial coating.

Get a Free Smaple Now

help flypped 2019-10-07
img

Keeping fit is the most important aspect of our life as it reflects a pleasing personality and also increases work efficiency.

Amazingly, this simple mixture has remarkable weight loss benefits.

It helps one to lose weight in a very simple way, and the best part is that it helps one to melt belly fat fast.

According to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, honey curbs appetite.

Consuming honey precisely before bedtime can help one burn more calories during the early hours of sleep.

This ingredient is enriched with essential vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats as well.

Joseph White 2019-04-23
img

Japanese scientists including researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) and Yokohama National University have identified the molecular mechanism that gives the skin secretions of a species of frog effective antimicrobial properties.

The Bombina variegata frog, also known as Yellow Bellied Toad, inhabits the forests, grasslands, wetland, and aquatic habitats across Central Europe.

They have attracted attention for their ability to inhibit Leishmaniasis -- a highly infectious and potentially fatal tropical disease that has affected an estimated 20 million people worldwide, with 1.3 million new cases and 20,000 to 30,000 deaths reported each year.

H4 is an isomer of H2 - they share the same formula but the atoms in the molecule are arranged differently - with H4 having a naturally occuring D-amino acid at the end of the molecular chain.

In terms of its antimicrobial properties, H4 is more potent than H2, but until now, the reason has remained an unsolved biological mystery.

The role of having D-amino acids is not fully understood in case of the frog."

Janet Gaines 2019-08-01
img

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that an elastic polymer possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes - including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

"We were exploring a different approach for creating antimicrobial materials when we observed some interesting behavior from this polymer and decided to explore its potential in greater depth," says Rich Spontak, co-corresponding author of a paper on the work and Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State.

"And what we found is extremely promising as an alternate weapon to existing materials-related approaches in the fight against drug-resistant pathogens.

This could be particularly useful in clinical settings - such as hospitals or doctor's offices - as well as senior-living facilities, where pathogen transmission can have dire consequences."

"When microbes come into contact with the polymer, water on the surface of the microbes interacts with the sulfonic acid functional groups in the polymer - creating an acidic solution that quickly kills the bacteria," says Reza Ghiladi, an associate professor of chemistry at NC State and co-corresponding author of the paper.

"These acidic solutions can be made more or less powerful by controlling the number of sulfonic acid functional groups in the polymer."

Frederick Jones 2019-04-18
img

EVANSTON, Ill. -- Antimicrobial paints offer the promise of extra protection against bacteria.

But Northwestern University researchers caution that these paints might be doing more harm than good.

In a new study, the researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints.

Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.

Most bacilli are commonly inhabit soil, but many are found in indoor environments.

"Bacillus is typically innocuous, but by attacking it, you might prompt it to develop more antibiotic resistance."

tanay tiwari 2019-08-22
img

Antimicrobial Textiles - MARKET ADVISORY SERVICES

Antimicrobial Textiles report studies the global market size of it, especially focuses on the key regions like United States, European Union, China, and other regions (Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia).This study presents the Antimicrobial Textiles production, revenue, market share and growth rate for each key company, and also covers the breakdown data (production, consumption, revenue and market share) by regions, type and applications.

history breakdown data from 2014 to 2019, and forecast to 2025.

The antimicrobial textiles market is expected to reach USD 1,076.1 Million by 2026, with a CAGR of 7.51% during forecast period 2016 to 2026.

In this report, 2018 has been considered as the base year and 2019 to 2025 as the forecast period to estimate the market size for Antimicrobial Textiles.For top companies in United States, European Union and China, this report investigates and analyzes the production, value, price, market share and growth rate for the top manufacturers, key data from 2014 to 2019.

In global market, the following companies Of Antimicrobial Textiles are covered:

Manuel Darcangelo 2019-04-02
img

However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of new-to-nature antibiotics.

Molecular biologists from the University of Groningen and their colleagues in Switzerland and Germany have now developed a pipeline to create and screen large numbers of new lantibiotic peptides.

A description of the method and the first results were published on 1 April in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.

Lantibiotic peptides are modified after they are produced by ribosomes.

Enzymes can link different amino acids within the peptide chain to form rings.

'We know that a selection of 12 natural lantibiotics all have different combinations.'

James Lamb 2019-07-22
img

University of Illinois Professor Nenad Miljkovic and his research group at Illinois have collaborated with John Boos & Co. to validate the antimicrobial efficacy of the company's proprietary cutting boards and companion board oil and cream.

Miljkovic tested the antimicrobial characteristics of the Effingham, Illinois-based company's USA-grown Northern Hard Rock Maple cutting boards, validating their ability to kill bacteria.

Additionally, data gathered by his team concluded that application of the John Boos Mystery Oil and Boos Block Board Cream on the boards created an antimicrobial, hydrophobic surface that decreased the surface bacteria to a clean level after three hours.

The study helped prove this particular cutting board is a safer, cleaner alternative to other boards currently on the market.

Miljkovic and his group in the Energy Transport Research Laboratory have extensive knowledge in the area of nanoengineered surfaces and coating technologies.

"We've been working on developing micro and nanostructured surfaces with antimicrobial function for the past four years as part of a separate collaboration with the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) and the Department of Entomology at Illinois.

Robert Holloway 2019-03-12
img

University of Groningen microbiologists and their colleagues from Lithuania have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures.

They also succeeded in transferring the genes required to produce this glycocin to an E. coli bacterium.

These findings were published in Nature Communications on 7 March.

The rise of antibiotic resistance has spurred the search for new antimicrobials.

Bacteriocins - peptide toxins produced by bacteria to inhibit growth in similar or related bacterial strains - are a possible alternative to the more traditional antibiotics.

'That is why we were interested to find that the thermophilic bacterium Aeribacillus palladius, isolated from the soil above an oil well in Lithuania, appeared to produce an antibacterial peptide,' says University of Groningen Professor of Molecular Biology, Oscar Kuipers.

James Neely 2019-06-24
img

The University of Liverpool (UoL) and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have been awarded £3.54m for a research project that aims to develop a 'personalised health' approach to prevent and treat antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Resistance to all antimicrobials, and especially bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics, is increasing.

It is now posing a serious threat to health both in the UK and globally, and risks undermining the major improvements in medicine that have been made in recent decades.

This new project will focus on personalised antimicrobial therapy as a way to prevent and treat AMR.

The funding will enable equipment to be purchased for real time measurement of drug concentrations in patients, rapid sequencing of bacteria from patients, performing pharmacogenetic analyses and real time pharmacodynamic analyses.

These approaches will be unified using artificial intelligence and deep learning in collaboration with the University of Liverpool's Department of Computer Science.