logo
logo
logo
logo
Donald Ellison 2016-09-19
img

The name of America s latest stealth bomber was just announced this morning.

And it s not Bomby McBomberface.

The B-21 will be known as the Raider and it s all thanks to two airmen who submitted the name.

The name was crowdsourced by the US Air Force, but the contest was only open to airmen and women and their families.

The Air Force received over 4,600 entries before they closed the contest in May.

Gizmodo submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for the list of names, which had been denied.

collect
0
Debra Simonds 2016-09-19
img

The name of America s latest stealth bomber was just announced this morning.

And it s not Bomby McBomberface.

The B-21 will be known as the Raider and it s all thanks to two airmen who submitted the name.

The name was crowdsourced by the Air Force, but the contest was only open to airmen and women and their families.

The Air Force received over 4,600 entries before they closed the contest in May.

Gizmodo submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for the list of names, which had been denied.

collect
0
John Feeney 2016-05-24
img

That s normally the sort of thing defense-minded types like to hear, but U.S. Air Force programs of the past few decades have a tendency to go completely off the rails.

By promising everything, the F-35 was hobbled by expectations and snuffed out alternatives.

Other stealth projects, from the F-22 to the F-35 to the Zumwalt, revealed the shapes of their vehicles, in concept and in prototype.

The B-21, instead, exists in the public eye as only a shape under a sheet or a rough rendering with a striking similarity to the B-2.

They assume a few major points: that nuclear-capable bombers are necessary, they there s a role for them in either conventional war or deterrence that isn t already provided by existing nuclear weapons and strike aircraft, and that the investment they require, as a highly advanced individual piece of technology, makes sense in the world of tomorrow.

His work regularly appears at Popular Science, and he edits even nerdier stories at Grand Blog Tarkin.

collect
0
Donald Ellison 2016-09-19
img

The name of America s latest stealth bomber was just announced this morning.

And it s not Bomby McBomberface.

The B-21 will be known as the Raider and it s all thanks to two airmen who submitted the name.

The name was crowdsourced by the US Air Force, but the contest was only open to airmen and women and their families.

The Air Force received over 4,600 entries before they closed the contest in May.

Gizmodo submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for the list of names, which had been denied.

John Feeney 2016-05-24
img

That s normally the sort of thing defense-minded types like to hear, but U.S. Air Force programs of the past few decades have a tendency to go completely off the rails.

By promising everything, the F-35 was hobbled by expectations and snuffed out alternatives.

Other stealth projects, from the F-22 to the F-35 to the Zumwalt, revealed the shapes of their vehicles, in concept and in prototype.

The B-21, instead, exists in the public eye as only a shape under a sheet or a rough rendering with a striking similarity to the B-2.

They assume a few major points: that nuclear-capable bombers are necessary, they there s a role for them in either conventional war or deterrence that isn t already provided by existing nuclear weapons and strike aircraft, and that the investment they require, as a highly advanced individual piece of technology, makes sense in the world of tomorrow.

His work regularly appears at Popular Science, and he edits even nerdier stories at Grand Blog Tarkin.

Debra Simonds 2016-09-19
img

The name of America s latest stealth bomber was just announced this morning.

And it s not Bomby McBomberface.

The B-21 will be known as the Raider and it s all thanks to two airmen who submitted the name.

The name was crowdsourced by the Air Force, but the contest was only open to airmen and women and their families.

The Air Force received over 4,600 entries before they closed the contest in May.

Gizmodo submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for the list of names, which had been denied.