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Melvin Bailey 2016-08-12
img

One email scammer tells comedian James Veitch that he could earn a $6 million profit in an unsuspecting way: snail farming.

As always, Veitch says he is in, but questions how to keep the snails in the farm.

What if the snails escape?

Watch this episode of Scamalot and see how the scammer reacts.

Subscribe to Mashable's YouTube for new episodes of Scamalot every Friday.

You can also catch up on the first season here: http://on.mash.to/2aBe7L9

collect
0
Jennifer Ervin 2016-08-16
img

Raise your hand: who hasn't fallen victim to cyberscams or at least come pretty close.

Among the most lucrative con games are technical support scams that scare people into buying expensive software to fix non-existent problems.

But a French security researcher now claims to have avenged us all.

In a blog post, Ivan Kwiatkowski recounts how he played along with the tricksters and duped them into downloading an attachment containing ransomware when they asked for his credit card details.

It all started when Kwiatkowski's parents landed on a fake website claiming they had been infected.

Instead of ignoring the scam, the researcher phoned the "Windows Help Desk" number in a bid to waste their time and reveal their ploy.

collect
0
George Summers 2017-06-28
img

Tech support scams have been around for over a decade now.

If, like me, you’ve experienced one, you’ll know they tend to involve someone claiming to be from a big firm (often Microsoft) calling to issue a warning about a made-up virus that’s been detected on your PC.

Their end game is to trick people into buying a fake piece of software to "remove" this imaginary issue, when what it actually does is install some information-stealing malware of its own.

While ransomware such as WannaCry and Petya/NotPetya/PetyaWrap appear to be the preferred method of computer-based extortion these days, tech scammers continue to prey on the less tech-savvy members of society, which typically includes older people.

But in the UK, the City of London Police teamed up with Microsoft to try and take down some of the perpetrators.

The BBC reports that following two years of investigations, authorities have just announced the arrest of four people on suspicion of fraud.

collect
0
Jeff Lusk 2017-07-04
img

Following the attack on Parliament’s network two weeks ago MPs were targeted by scam callers in an effort to obtain passwords

Scammers have telephoned MPs in an effort to obtain their passwords to the parliamentary network, Parliament’s digital service has confirmed.

The scam calls follow a sustained attack two weeks ago that forced administrators to lock users out of their accounts on the network, which is used by all MPs, including the prime minister, to interact with constituents.

It has now emerged that in the week week following the network attack scammers telephoned MPs and tried to obtain their passwords.

In an alert sent to the network’s users last Thursday, Parliament’s digital service warned that the callers identified themselves as being official staff helping remediate the earlier attack, according to a report by The Telegraph.

“On Thursday afternoon a small number of parliamentary users were telephoned and asked for their parliamentary username and password by a caller claiming to be employed by ‘Windows’ on behalf of the Parliamentary Digital Service to help with the cyber attack,” Parliament stated.

collect
0
Danny Knackstedt 2017-07-26
img

The rise of virtual kidnapping scams are terrorising people into paying ransoms.

Do you want to see the rest of her in a body bag?"

"She called me Mum (and said) 'I'm terrified, please help,' " Sobel recalled.

"I was in bad shape for days," she said.

On Tuesday, police and federal agents warned that so-called virtual kidnappings are on the rise, and dozens of people already have found themselves terrorized into giving money to con artists.

Los Angeles police alone have received more than 250 reports of such crimes in the past two years, and people have wired more than $100,000, said Capt.

collect
0
Julie Romero 2017-11-06
img

Many email scams are rather crude and easy to spot, but they’re getting more sophisticated all the time.

You might think there’s no way you’ll ever be fooled, but a fleeting moment of distraction or break in concentration might lead you to click on a link you shouldn’t, and who knows where you might end up after that.

The latest such scam to come to our attention has Netflix members in its sights — all 109 million of them — and it looks pretty genuine at first glance.

Picked up by Australian web and email security firm MailGuard, the subject line of the email reads “Your suspension notification.”

If the email makes it through your filters and into your inbox and you decide to take a look, you’ll see that the scammers are trying to make you believe Netflix is having an issue validating your billing information.

A note declaring that your Netflix account will be suspended if you don’t respond within 48 hours aims to persuade you to click on the “restart membership” button at the end of the message.

collect
0
Ness Naira 2019-03-11
img

That’s how human nature works.

* People who have really bought the bid pack and bid on a couple of auctions, thinking they should’ve won something, ended up jumping to a conclusion that DealDash scam is a real thing.

* People who have never bid on DealDash before and upon checking the site they find out things are being sold out for low prices and ended up jumping to a conclusion that DealDash scam is a real thing.

These products can vary from household items to furniture to electric devices.

Nevertheless, unlike other sites, the bids will increase by a penny at a time til the time runs out for the auction.

DealDash is not failing to claim that the maximum number of winners get products at 60-99% off retail pricing, including free shipping as well.

collect
0
Kevin Oconnor 2017-11-13
img

Email scammers are the scum of the earth and deserve forever itchy butts.

I’ve always wondered if there was something I could do beyond just wishing them ill, and I’m happy to report I’ve now found a way to give them a dose of their own medicine.

Rescam is an AI bot that sends authentic-sounding automated replies to phishers’ messages, tying them up in the process of chasing a lead.

It works with Nigerian princes, deceased dukes, philanthropic trusts, and even lotteries you haven’t entered – and it doesn’t cost you a dime.

To use it, just forward a scammy message to [email protected] from your inbox, and sit back and watch the fun.

Rescam will check if the email is indeed fraudulent, and then proceed to reply with a message that sounds like it could’ve come from a real person.

collect
0
Diane Thomason 2016-05-24
img

Scammers are lurking in every corner of the site, just waiting to take advantage of vulnerable people in search of bargains.

HUGE LEAK: This is probably our first look at a real iPhone 7

The first scam is a particularly awful one because it preys on people when they re at their most vulnerable.

Find the right movers and you can potentially save plenty of money carting your belongings from your old residence to your new one.

But find the wrong movers and you could end up like this family in Georgia, who lost $75,000 worth of furniture and other household items when movers packed up all their belongings and just took off.

Bottom line: buying or renting a new home is expensive and moving adds even more cost to the equation.

The scam stated that the homeowners would be gone for between three and four years on a mission trip out of the country and needless to say, the listing drew tremendous attention.

collect
0
Christopher Hardy 2016-09-13
img

Security researcher Christian Haschek says he has mixed feelings about catching the scammer

A cybersecurity researcher living in Austria who was scammed out of $500 £375 says his money was returned after he tracked down the scammer's family and contacted them on Facebook.

Christian Haschek's blog post about how he caught the thief has been viewed more than 100,000 times in five days.

The scammer was using the same usernames elsewhere on the net, which made him easier to track down.

"On the one hand, this is someone who stole $500 from me and deleted all the accounts that I used to get back to him, he never answered my messages," he told the BBC.

He seemed to come from a poor background and said he was a full-time student.

collect
0
John Burns 2017-04-13
img

Easter is a time for family, colorful parties and egg hunts, but sadly it also attracts scam artists looking to make a quick buck during the high-fructose corn syrup free-for-all.

Some people say Easter was originally a pagan holiday to celebrate fertility, which explains the eggs and bunnies, but it’s primarily a religious holiday, and as such there are plenty of scams out there pointed at spiritually minded people looking to make the world a better place.

If you get an email from a charity, even if it’s one you’ve given to in the past, don’t click any links.

And although this should go without saying, never give a donation over the phone if you receive an unsolicited solicitation.

Call the charity, or use a secure site to make your contribution rather than providing your information by phone, or send a check.

Before you click on the link below a message, ask yourself: Is it worth hours of hassle getting a virus off your computer or causing malware to install ransomware or a keystroke logger on your machine that gives a crook access to every financial account you visit on your computer?

collect
0
William Hill 2016-10-02
img

That s because the project creators, Chicago-based comedy group FND Films, managed to raise a whopping $77,900 to produce a feature-length film, and then blew it all on traveling, partying, and, er, the finer things in life.

But that s not even the best part — there actually is a movie.

It scalled It s All Good, and it s an action comedy about three guys who turn to a crowdfunding platform to raise money for a film, then blow the cash.

In what can only be described as an elaborate hoax of rather epic proportion, FND Films first posted the campaign back in 2014.

The group revealed very little about the project, saying only that they sought to create an action-comedy starring Aaron Fronk, Vinny DeGaetano and Cooper Johnson that blends absurd humor with an intricate plot.

But then, after reaching their goal and issuing what seemed like a heartfelt thank you in November of 2014, the creators disappeared.

collect
0
Betty Saliba 2016-10-21

Millennials aren t as savvy online as they might lead on.

A new survey found that half of all tech support scam victims were 18- to 34-year-olds.

For comparison sake, the next age group 36 to 54 made up just over a third 34 percent , and the old-timers over 55 were only 17 percent as likely to be conned.

The recent Ipsos poll took place in 12 countries and surveyed 1,000 people on behalf of Microsoft.

Tech support scams have been around a while, but they re increasingly common.

The scam typically involves a third-party that calls, emails, or instant messages, claiming to be with Microsoft, Apple, Dell, HP, or any number of other well-known computer companies.

collect
0
John Robidoux 2017-11-10
img

An online safety organisation based in New Zealand, has developed an artificially intelligent email bot has a new approach to the problem of email scammers.

The Re:scam bot, which was developed by Netsafe, tackles email spammers and scammers by wasting their time.

Any time you get a scam email, you can forward that email onto Re:scam ([email protected]) which will then engage in conversation with the scammer.

"Re:scam can take on multiple personas, imitating real human tendencies with humour and grammatical errors, and can engage with infinite scammers at once," says Netsafe.

It may take several email exchanges for the scammer to realise he or she isn't talking to a human, effectively reducing the scammer's potential victims.

Once the conversation has ended, Re:scam will send a copy of the email chain back to you, which could be fun to read back, depending on the foolishness of your scammer.

collect
0
Thomas Nye 2016-08-16
img

Whether by telephone or via fake websites, tech support scammers are a problem.

While their tricks are unlikely to fool tech-savvy users, they ve still managed to con a large number of victims out of money.

But one group of online criminals picked on the wrong people.

French security researcher Ivan Kwiatkowski's parents rang him after stumbling across a website that displayed a load of meaningless numbers, filenames and popups, one of which stated that their computer had been infected with the Zeus virus.

Kwiatkowski obviously knew what was going on, so he decided to teach the scammers a lesson.

After booting a virtual machine running Windows XP, he called the tech support number listed on the website.

collect
0
Eric Spilde 2016-07-25
img

If tragedy hits someone you know, and a friend sets up a crowdfunding page to help them out with medical bills or other expenses, it s natural to want to donate a few bucks.

But some of these pages are scams—even if the tragedy is real, and happened to someone you know.

Since anyone can set up a crowdfunding site, scammers can grab your friend s name and picture and set up a fund for them.

Scammers have even copied whole fundraising pages, so the only difference between the real page and the scam is who the money goes to.

Sometimes a fundraiser really is managed by a friend of the family, but the friend never passes on the money.

GoFundMe writes on their safety page that there s no way to 100% guarantee a fundraiser is on the up-and-up, but suggests some things to look for:

collect
0
Melvin Bailey 2016-08-12
img

One email scammer tells comedian James Veitch that he could earn a $6 million profit in an unsuspecting way: snail farming.

As always, Veitch says he is in, but questions how to keep the snails in the farm.

What if the snails escape?

Watch this episode of Scamalot and see how the scammer reacts.

Subscribe to Mashable's YouTube for new episodes of Scamalot every Friday.

You can also catch up on the first season here: http://on.mash.to/2aBe7L9

George Summers 2017-06-28
img

Tech support scams have been around for over a decade now.

If, like me, you’ve experienced one, you’ll know they tend to involve someone claiming to be from a big firm (often Microsoft) calling to issue a warning about a made-up virus that’s been detected on your PC.

Their end game is to trick people into buying a fake piece of software to "remove" this imaginary issue, when what it actually does is install some information-stealing malware of its own.

While ransomware such as WannaCry and Petya/NotPetya/PetyaWrap appear to be the preferred method of computer-based extortion these days, tech scammers continue to prey on the less tech-savvy members of society, which typically includes older people.

But in the UK, the City of London Police teamed up with Microsoft to try and take down some of the perpetrators.

The BBC reports that following two years of investigations, authorities have just announced the arrest of four people on suspicion of fraud.

Danny Knackstedt 2017-07-26
img

The rise of virtual kidnapping scams are terrorising people into paying ransoms.

Do you want to see the rest of her in a body bag?"

"She called me Mum (and said) 'I'm terrified, please help,' " Sobel recalled.

"I was in bad shape for days," she said.

On Tuesday, police and federal agents warned that so-called virtual kidnappings are on the rise, and dozens of people already have found themselves terrorized into giving money to con artists.

Los Angeles police alone have received more than 250 reports of such crimes in the past two years, and people have wired more than $100,000, said Capt.

Ness Naira 2019-03-11
img

That’s how human nature works.

* People who have really bought the bid pack and bid on a couple of auctions, thinking they should’ve won something, ended up jumping to a conclusion that DealDash scam is a real thing.

* People who have never bid on DealDash before and upon checking the site they find out things are being sold out for low prices and ended up jumping to a conclusion that DealDash scam is a real thing.

These products can vary from household items to furniture to electric devices.

Nevertheless, unlike other sites, the bids will increase by a penny at a time til the time runs out for the auction.

DealDash is not failing to claim that the maximum number of winners get products at 60-99% off retail pricing, including free shipping as well.

Diane Thomason 2016-05-24
img

Scammers are lurking in every corner of the site, just waiting to take advantage of vulnerable people in search of bargains.

HUGE LEAK: This is probably our first look at a real iPhone 7

The first scam is a particularly awful one because it preys on people when they re at their most vulnerable.

Find the right movers and you can potentially save plenty of money carting your belongings from your old residence to your new one.

But find the wrong movers and you could end up like this family in Georgia, who lost $75,000 worth of furniture and other household items when movers packed up all their belongings and just took off.

Bottom line: buying or renting a new home is expensive and moving adds even more cost to the equation.

The scam stated that the homeowners would be gone for between three and four years on a mission trip out of the country and needless to say, the listing drew tremendous attention.

John Burns 2017-04-13
img

Easter is a time for family, colorful parties and egg hunts, but sadly it also attracts scam artists looking to make a quick buck during the high-fructose corn syrup free-for-all.

Some people say Easter was originally a pagan holiday to celebrate fertility, which explains the eggs and bunnies, but it’s primarily a religious holiday, and as such there are plenty of scams out there pointed at spiritually minded people looking to make the world a better place.

If you get an email from a charity, even if it’s one you’ve given to in the past, don’t click any links.

And although this should go without saying, never give a donation over the phone if you receive an unsolicited solicitation.

Call the charity, or use a secure site to make your contribution rather than providing your information by phone, or send a check.

Before you click on the link below a message, ask yourself: Is it worth hours of hassle getting a virus off your computer or causing malware to install ransomware or a keystroke logger on your machine that gives a crook access to every financial account you visit on your computer?

Betty Saliba 2016-10-21

Millennials aren t as savvy online as they might lead on.

A new survey found that half of all tech support scam victims were 18- to 34-year-olds.

For comparison sake, the next age group 36 to 54 made up just over a third 34 percent , and the old-timers over 55 were only 17 percent as likely to be conned.

The recent Ipsos poll took place in 12 countries and surveyed 1,000 people on behalf of Microsoft.

Tech support scams have been around a while, but they re increasingly common.

The scam typically involves a third-party that calls, emails, or instant messages, claiming to be with Microsoft, Apple, Dell, HP, or any number of other well-known computer companies.

Thomas Nye 2016-08-16
img

Whether by telephone or via fake websites, tech support scammers are a problem.

While their tricks are unlikely to fool tech-savvy users, they ve still managed to con a large number of victims out of money.

But one group of online criminals picked on the wrong people.

French security researcher Ivan Kwiatkowski's parents rang him after stumbling across a website that displayed a load of meaningless numbers, filenames and popups, one of which stated that their computer had been infected with the Zeus virus.

Kwiatkowski obviously knew what was going on, so he decided to teach the scammers a lesson.

After booting a virtual machine running Windows XP, he called the tech support number listed on the website.

Jennifer Ervin 2016-08-16
img

Raise your hand: who hasn't fallen victim to cyberscams or at least come pretty close.

Among the most lucrative con games are technical support scams that scare people into buying expensive software to fix non-existent problems.

But a French security researcher now claims to have avenged us all.

In a blog post, Ivan Kwiatkowski recounts how he played along with the tricksters and duped them into downloading an attachment containing ransomware when they asked for his credit card details.

It all started when Kwiatkowski's parents landed on a fake website claiming they had been infected.

Instead of ignoring the scam, the researcher phoned the "Windows Help Desk" number in a bid to waste their time and reveal their ploy.

Jeff Lusk 2017-07-04
img

Following the attack on Parliament’s network two weeks ago MPs were targeted by scam callers in an effort to obtain passwords

Scammers have telephoned MPs in an effort to obtain their passwords to the parliamentary network, Parliament’s digital service has confirmed.

The scam calls follow a sustained attack two weeks ago that forced administrators to lock users out of their accounts on the network, which is used by all MPs, including the prime minister, to interact with constituents.

It has now emerged that in the week week following the network attack scammers telephoned MPs and tried to obtain their passwords.

In an alert sent to the network’s users last Thursday, Parliament’s digital service warned that the callers identified themselves as being official staff helping remediate the earlier attack, according to a report by The Telegraph.

“On Thursday afternoon a small number of parliamentary users were telephoned and asked for their parliamentary username and password by a caller claiming to be employed by ‘Windows’ on behalf of the Parliamentary Digital Service to help with the cyber attack,” Parliament stated.

Julie Romero 2017-11-06
img

Many email scams are rather crude and easy to spot, but they’re getting more sophisticated all the time.

You might think there’s no way you’ll ever be fooled, but a fleeting moment of distraction or break in concentration might lead you to click on a link you shouldn’t, and who knows where you might end up after that.

The latest such scam to come to our attention has Netflix members in its sights — all 109 million of them — and it looks pretty genuine at first glance.

Picked up by Australian web and email security firm MailGuard, the subject line of the email reads “Your suspension notification.”

If the email makes it through your filters and into your inbox and you decide to take a look, you’ll see that the scammers are trying to make you believe Netflix is having an issue validating your billing information.

A note declaring that your Netflix account will be suspended if you don’t respond within 48 hours aims to persuade you to click on the “restart membership” button at the end of the message.

Kevin Oconnor 2017-11-13
img

Email scammers are the scum of the earth and deserve forever itchy butts.

I’ve always wondered if there was something I could do beyond just wishing them ill, and I’m happy to report I’ve now found a way to give them a dose of their own medicine.

Rescam is an AI bot that sends authentic-sounding automated replies to phishers’ messages, tying them up in the process of chasing a lead.

It works with Nigerian princes, deceased dukes, philanthropic trusts, and even lotteries you haven’t entered – and it doesn’t cost you a dime.

To use it, just forward a scammy message to [email protected] from your inbox, and sit back and watch the fun.

Rescam will check if the email is indeed fraudulent, and then proceed to reply with a message that sounds like it could’ve come from a real person.

Christopher Hardy 2016-09-13
img

Security researcher Christian Haschek says he has mixed feelings about catching the scammer

A cybersecurity researcher living in Austria who was scammed out of $500 £375 says his money was returned after he tracked down the scammer's family and contacted them on Facebook.

Christian Haschek's blog post about how he caught the thief has been viewed more than 100,000 times in five days.

The scammer was using the same usernames elsewhere on the net, which made him easier to track down.

"On the one hand, this is someone who stole $500 from me and deleted all the accounts that I used to get back to him, he never answered my messages," he told the BBC.

He seemed to come from a poor background and said he was a full-time student.

William Hill 2016-10-02
img

That s because the project creators, Chicago-based comedy group FND Films, managed to raise a whopping $77,900 to produce a feature-length film, and then blew it all on traveling, partying, and, er, the finer things in life.

But that s not even the best part — there actually is a movie.

It scalled It s All Good, and it s an action comedy about three guys who turn to a crowdfunding platform to raise money for a film, then blow the cash.

In what can only be described as an elaborate hoax of rather epic proportion, FND Films first posted the campaign back in 2014.

The group revealed very little about the project, saying only that they sought to create an action-comedy starring Aaron Fronk, Vinny DeGaetano and Cooper Johnson that blends absurd humor with an intricate plot.

But then, after reaching their goal and issuing what seemed like a heartfelt thank you in November of 2014, the creators disappeared.

John Robidoux 2017-11-10
img

An online safety organisation based in New Zealand, has developed an artificially intelligent email bot has a new approach to the problem of email scammers.

The Re:scam bot, which was developed by Netsafe, tackles email spammers and scammers by wasting their time.

Any time you get a scam email, you can forward that email onto Re:scam ([email protected]) which will then engage in conversation with the scammer.

"Re:scam can take on multiple personas, imitating real human tendencies with humour and grammatical errors, and can engage with infinite scammers at once," says Netsafe.

It may take several email exchanges for the scammer to realise he or she isn't talking to a human, effectively reducing the scammer's potential victims.

Once the conversation has ended, Re:scam will send a copy of the email chain back to you, which could be fun to read back, depending on the foolishness of your scammer.

Eric Spilde 2016-07-25
img

If tragedy hits someone you know, and a friend sets up a crowdfunding page to help them out with medical bills or other expenses, it s natural to want to donate a few bucks.

But some of these pages are scams—even if the tragedy is real, and happened to someone you know.

Since anyone can set up a crowdfunding site, scammers can grab your friend s name and picture and set up a fund for them.

Scammers have even copied whole fundraising pages, so the only difference between the real page and the scam is who the money goes to.

Sometimes a fundraiser really is managed by a friend of the family, but the friend never passes on the money.

GoFundMe writes on their safety page that there s no way to 100% guarantee a fundraiser is on the up-and-up, but suggests some things to look for: