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Edmond Mccolpin 2017-03-13
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Facebook has called for youngsters and other tech and social media giants to fight extremism and hate.

The firm's policy head Monika Bickert, spoke at SXSW on 11 March, at an event titled "Taking Back the Internet: Countering Extremism."

Bickert reportedly said that social media platforms like Facebook, need to adopt a more proactive approach to combating hate speech and extremism that goes beyond merely removing extremist content.

"Even if we were perfect at keeping violent extremism from ever hitting our community and other technology companies were perfect, we know that alone isn't enough to change minds or stop the spread of violent extremism," Bickert said at SXSW, the Guardian reported.

"The best remedy is good speech that gets people thinking and challenging ideologies.

We focus on trying to amplify some of the voices to counter violent narratives," the Facebook policy chief added.

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Anthony Couture 2016-02-07
img

the interior ministry warns of increased hate speech and fake news.

according to the ministry, they create a growth base for violence the risk of radicalisation and extremism.

the ministry considered the violent extremism of the state of play, that violent radicalisation, extremism and extremist activities have come to Finland previously visible.

the Review highlights, inter alia, the extreme right-wing of the Nordic resistance movement activities.

collect
0
Robert Holloway 2020-10-21
img
Facebook and Instagram users searching for terms related to QAnon will be directed to credible resources from the Global Network on Extremism and Technology starting Wednesday. The social network said in an update to an August Newsroom post that this marks the latest expansion of its Redirect Initiative to help combat violent extremism. GNET is...
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0
James Dixon 2017-06-23
img

Facebook brought its anti-extremism program to the UK on Friday in the wake of a spate of terrorist incidents that have rocked the country.

Under the umbrella of the "Online Civil Courage Initiative," Facebook will offer training, marketing support and best practice advice to nongovernmental organizations on tackling hate speech, as well financial support for research into online and offline patterns of extremism.

The initiative launched in Germany and France earlier this year.

It arrives in the UK following four terrorist attacks over the course of three months, after which Prime Minister Theresa May promised a crackdown on online extremism.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged in the 6,000-word manifesto he published in February that the social network has a definite role to play in thwarting extremism and the recruitment of terrorists.

The launch of the initiative in the UK also comes a week after Facebook announced new measures to counter terrorism, which included a combination of human expertise and artificial intelligence techniques to root out fake accounts, problematic language, propaganda and terrorist clusters.

collect
0
Isiah Jone 2017-02-02
img

Donald Trump’s administration is to rename the generic ‘Countering Violent Extremism’ (CVE) program to ‘Countering Islamic Extremism’ in a plan which no longer focuses on all terrorist groups.

The reports – coming from five people briefed on the matter – arrives just days following a white supremacist terror attack on a Muslim community in Quebec, Canada.

While threats from Islamic extremists remains high, the recent attack in Canada proves it’s as important as ever to combat terrorism in all its forms.

Republicans in Congress have long assailed the program as politically correct and ineffective

CVE, as it’s currently known, is a “three-pronged” initiative to counter radicalism through disrupting online and offline propaganda.

This involves community engagements, better training, and providing counter-narratives which highlights the reality that “violent extremism is a dead end.”

collect
0
Harvey Ayers 2017-06-19
img

Google is line to four different means, which it intends to take to fight extremism-related material against the video service Youtube.

google's general counsel Kent Walker announced that Google is committed to solving this problem, in order for extremists to stir up the content to reduce the network, told CNBC.

”Terrorism is an attack on open societies, and the violence and hate that threat identification is the most important challenge for all of us,” Walker said.

”Our service is not going to be a place of terror-related content.”

Google plans to invest more resources to develop further artificial intelligence programs, which can be trained to identify and eliminate extremism contents.

Google also intends to expand the non-aligned number of experts, who follow the extremism of the content and inform.

collect
0
Dennis Colella 2017-06-23
img

Facebook is adding more allies in its fight against violence and terrorism.

On Friday, the tech firm launched a new program in the United Kingdom to help non-governmental organizations and anti-terrorism groups speak up against extremist groups online.

The social media giant, which has faced criticism from politicians for not doing enough to combat extremism, said it will help these groups connect to experts and provide ad credits for counterspeech campaigns.

Facebook is also funding academic research on extremism, but did not specify how much it’s contributing.

“While research shows that radicalization mostly happens offline, the battle for hearts and minds can be won online too,” Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg wrote on Friday.

“We want to make it easier for people to stand together against extremism and hatred online – because we have seen how powerful that can be.”

collect
0
Thomas Cann 2021-03-25
img
Facebook’s efforts to combat extremism remain at odds with engagement goals.
collect
0
Kyle Greathouse 2019-08-04
img

Previously, manifestos were published by the alleged Christchurch shooter, who killed 51 people at two mosques in New Zealand in March, and the gunman who opened fire and killed one person at a synagogue in Poway, California, in April.

They, too, used 8chan to deliver their epistles of hate.

Both times, and now again with El Paso, extremism researchers have pleaded the same case: Don’t amplify the message.

“Those manifestos are specifically designed to be objects of media manipulation,” says Whitney Phillips, who researches troll culture and online extremism at Syracuse University.

“They’re written and publicized in a way to generate the maximum amount of journalistic coverage.”

At the same time, it seems difficult to outright ignore these postings, especially when some politicians attempt to fill that void by blaming videogames rather than racist extremism.

collect
0
Joseph Cormier 2021-01-26
img
Amid a Biden administration crackdown on domestic extremism, Carlson warned of politicians attempting to "control what you believe."
collect
0
James Flachs 2021-02-17
img
Democrats say they want to examine traditional media's role in promoting "disinformation and extremism."
collect
0
Charles Glass 2021-01-22
img
A letter to the CEOs of several major tech companies says their platforms may push people toward extremism.
collect
0
John Dumlao 2016-08-25
img

News: Home Affairs Select Committee slam Twitter, Facebook and YouTube for consciously failing to stop online extremism.

MPs have slammed social media companies in regards to their role in fighting terrorism, with the Home Affairs Select Committee accusing social media companies of consciously failing to combat groups promoting extremism.

In the crosshairs of the Home Affairs Select Committee were three of the biggest social media companies – Twitter, Facebook and YouTube owner Google.

Although the tech giants said that they were taking their role in fighting terrorism very seriously, the MPs accused the companies of passing the buck when it came to tackling online extremism.

In the report, the MPs said: "Networks like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are the vehicle of choice in spreading propaganda and they have become the recruiting platforms for terrorism.

They must accept that the hundreds of millions in revenues generated from billions of people using their products needs to be accompanied by a greater sense of responsibility and ownership for the impact that extremist material on their sites is having."

collect
0
Warren Edwards 2021-01-22
img
Lawmakers recommended Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter make sweeping design changes to stop chasing user engagement in order to curb extremism.
collect
0
Keith Brewton 2017-09-19
img

It's not easy to host extremist right-wing content on the modern Internet.

Gab, a small Twitter rival that bills itself as a bastion of free speech, has received word from its Australian domain registrar that it has five days to find a new registrar, or its domain will be canceled.

The story begins last month, when the neo-Nazi site the Daily Stormer got a similar message from its domain registrar, GoDaddy.

The editor of the Daily Stormer had written an article mocking Heather Heyer, who died in protest-related violence in Charlottesville.

The Daily Stormer wound up losing its domain name, and two key people associated with the site—editor Andrew Anglin and webmaster Andrew Auernheimer—switched to Gab as their primary way of communicating with the public.

Hosting Anglin and Aurenheimer—as well as other right-wing figures like Internet troll Milo Yiannopoulos—has created headaches for Gab.

collect
0
Michael Wadsworth 2017-02-02
img

The latest development in Donald Trump s controversial treatment of the Muslim community is a new plan to rename the Countering Violent Extremism programme to Countering Islamic Extremism.

The plan calls for the programme to no longer focus on all terrorist groups—like white supremacists—and solely target potential Muslim extremists.

When the CVE strategy was first announced, officials described it as a three-pronged approach that includes community engagement, better training, and counternarratives that make a case for why violent extremism is a dead end.

Both Facebook and Google participate in the CVE programme, but it s not clear to what extent.

Monica Bickert, Facebook s head of global policy management, told Reuters early last year, You don t necessarily know if something is going to change the way someone thinks offline, but we can measure whether somebody shares that content or interacts with it.

Those companies participation in the program would certainly become more controversial if the planned name change goes through.

collect
0
Edmond Mccolpin 2017-03-13
img

Facebook has called for youngsters and other tech and social media giants to fight extremism and hate.

The firm's policy head Monika Bickert, spoke at SXSW on 11 March, at an event titled "Taking Back the Internet: Countering Extremism."

Bickert reportedly said that social media platforms like Facebook, need to adopt a more proactive approach to combating hate speech and extremism that goes beyond merely removing extremist content.

"Even if we were perfect at keeping violent extremism from ever hitting our community and other technology companies were perfect, we know that alone isn't enough to change minds or stop the spread of violent extremism," Bickert said at SXSW, the Guardian reported.

"The best remedy is good speech that gets people thinking and challenging ideologies.

We focus on trying to amplify some of the voices to counter violent narratives," the Facebook policy chief added.

Robert Holloway 2020-10-21
img
Facebook and Instagram users searching for terms related to QAnon will be directed to credible resources from the Global Network on Extremism and Technology starting Wednesday. The social network said in an update to an August Newsroom post that this marks the latest expansion of its Redirect Initiative to help combat violent extremism. GNET is...
Isiah Jone 2017-02-02
img

Donald Trump’s administration is to rename the generic ‘Countering Violent Extremism’ (CVE) program to ‘Countering Islamic Extremism’ in a plan which no longer focuses on all terrorist groups.

The reports – coming from five people briefed on the matter – arrives just days following a white supremacist terror attack on a Muslim community in Quebec, Canada.

While threats from Islamic extremists remains high, the recent attack in Canada proves it’s as important as ever to combat terrorism in all its forms.

Republicans in Congress have long assailed the program as politically correct and ineffective

CVE, as it’s currently known, is a “three-pronged” initiative to counter radicalism through disrupting online and offline propaganda.

This involves community engagements, better training, and providing counter-narratives which highlights the reality that “violent extremism is a dead end.”

Dennis Colella 2017-06-23
img

Facebook is adding more allies in its fight against violence and terrorism.

On Friday, the tech firm launched a new program in the United Kingdom to help non-governmental organizations and anti-terrorism groups speak up against extremist groups online.

The social media giant, which has faced criticism from politicians for not doing enough to combat extremism, said it will help these groups connect to experts and provide ad credits for counterspeech campaigns.

Facebook is also funding academic research on extremism, but did not specify how much it’s contributing.

“While research shows that radicalization mostly happens offline, the battle for hearts and minds can be won online too,” Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg wrote on Friday.

“We want to make it easier for people to stand together against extremism and hatred online – because we have seen how powerful that can be.”

Kyle Greathouse 2019-08-04
img

Previously, manifestos were published by the alleged Christchurch shooter, who killed 51 people at two mosques in New Zealand in March, and the gunman who opened fire and killed one person at a synagogue in Poway, California, in April.

They, too, used 8chan to deliver their epistles of hate.

Both times, and now again with El Paso, extremism researchers have pleaded the same case: Don’t amplify the message.

“Those manifestos are specifically designed to be objects of media manipulation,” says Whitney Phillips, who researches troll culture and online extremism at Syracuse University.

“They’re written and publicized in a way to generate the maximum amount of journalistic coverage.”

At the same time, it seems difficult to outright ignore these postings, especially when some politicians attempt to fill that void by blaming videogames rather than racist extremism.

James Flachs 2021-02-17
img
Democrats say they want to examine traditional media's role in promoting "disinformation and extremism."
John Dumlao 2016-08-25
img

News: Home Affairs Select Committee slam Twitter, Facebook and YouTube for consciously failing to stop online extremism.

MPs have slammed social media companies in regards to their role in fighting terrorism, with the Home Affairs Select Committee accusing social media companies of consciously failing to combat groups promoting extremism.

In the crosshairs of the Home Affairs Select Committee were three of the biggest social media companies – Twitter, Facebook and YouTube owner Google.

Although the tech giants said that they were taking their role in fighting terrorism very seriously, the MPs accused the companies of passing the buck when it came to tackling online extremism.

In the report, the MPs said: "Networks like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are the vehicle of choice in spreading propaganda and they have become the recruiting platforms for terrorism.

They must accept that the hundreds of millions in revenues generated from billions of people using their products needs to be accompanied by a greater sense of responsibility and ownership for the impact that extremist material on their sites is having."

Keith Brewton 2017-09-19
img

It's not easy to host extremist right-wing content on the modern Internet.

Gab, a small Twitter rival that bills itself as a bastion of free speech, has received word from its Australian domain registrar that it has five days to find a new registrar, or its domain will be canceled.

The story begins last month, when the neo-Nazi site the Daily Stormer got a similar message from its domain registrar, GoDaddy.

The editor of the Daily Stormer had written an article mocking Heather Heyer, who died in protest-related violence in Charlottesville.

The Daily Stormer wound up losing its domain name, and two key people associated with the site—editor Andrew Anglin and webmaster Andrew Auernheimer—switched to Gab as their primary way of communicating with the public.

Hosting Anglin and Aurenheimer—as well as other right-wing figures like Internet troll Milo Yiannopoulos—has created headaches for Gab.

Anthony Couture 2016-02-07
img

the interior ministry warns of increased hate speech and fake news.

according to the ministry, they create a growth base for violence the risk of radicalisation and extremism.

the ministry considered the violent extremism of the state of play, that violent radicalisation, extremism and extremist activities have come to Finland previously visible.

the Review highlights, inter alia, the extreme right-wing of the Nordic resistance movement activities.

James Dixon 2017-06-23
img

Facebook brought its anti-extremism program to the UK on Friday in the wake of a spate of terrorist incidents that have rocked the country.

Under the umbrella of the "Online Civil Courage Initiative," Facebook will offer training, marketing support and best practice advice to nongovernmental organizations on tackling hate speech, as well financial support for research into online and offline patterns of extremism.

The initiative launched in Germany and France earlier this year.

It arrives in the UK following four terrorist attacks over the course of three months, after which Prime Minister Theresa May promised a crackdown on online extremism.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged in the 6,000-word manifesto he published in February that the social network has a definite role to play in thwarting extremism and the recruitment of terrorists.

The launch of the initiative in the UK also comes a week after Facebook announced new measures to counter terrorism, which included a combination of human expertise and artificial intelligence techniques to root out fake accounts, problematic language, propaganda and terrorist clusters.

Harvey Ayers 2017-06-19
img

Google is line to four different means, which it intends to take to fight extremism-related material against the video service Youtube.

google's general counsel Kent Walker announced that Google is committed to solving this problem, in order for extremists to stir up the content to reduce the network, told CNBC.

”Terrorism is an attack on open societies, and the violence and hate that threat identification is the most important challenge for all of us,” Walker said.

”Our service is not going to be a place of terror-related content.”

Google plans to invest more resources to develop further artificial intelligence programs, which can be trained to identify and eliminate extremism contents.

Google also intends to expand the non-aligned number of experts, who follow the extremism of the content and inform.

Thomas Cann 2021-03-25
img
Facebook’s efforts to combat extremism remain at odds with engagement goals.
Joseph Cormier 2021-01-26
img
Amid a Biden administration crackdown on domestic extremism, Carlson warned of politicians attempting to "control what you believe."
Charles Glass 2021-01-22
img
A letter to the CEOs of several major tech companies says their platforms may push people toward extremism.
Warren Edwards 2021-01-22
img
Lawmakers recommended Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter make sweeping design changes to stop chasing user engagement in order to curb extremism.
Michael Wadsworth 2017-02-02
img

The latest development in Donald Trump s controversial treatment of the Muslim community is a new plan to rename the Countering Violent Extremism programme to Countering Islamic Extremism.

The plan calls for the programme to no longer focus on all terrorist groups—like white supremacists—and solely target potential Muslim extremists.

When the CVE strategy was first announced, officials described it as a three-pronged approach that includes community engagement, better training, and counternarratives that make a case for why violent extremism is a dead end.

Both Facebook and Google participate in the CVE programme, but it s not clear to what extent.

Monica Bickert, Facebook s head of global policy management, told Reuters early last year, You don t necessarily know if something is going to change the way someone thinks offline, but we can measure whether somebody shares that content or interacts with it.

Those companies participation in the program would certainly become more controversial if the planned name change goes through.