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Gailter stone 2021-11-21
It is also good to understand how an ac company chapel hill nc works in order to know when to call an ac company chapel hill nc. This knowledge will also help you know when is the proper time to call someone to repair your air conditioning unit. The answer to those questions will lead you to call an ac company chapel hill nc for your ac company chapel hill nc. If these situations are not rectified, you will be facing a very huge bill for your cooling services. This can lead to some tough financial times.
collect
0
James Dixon 2017-03-23
img

The Financial Times wants to grow its video audience, but it’s got a problem: Business executives tend not to share video.

A new study from the FT, done with content-production company Alpha Grid, found just 10 percent of business executives in its sample shared video content regularly.

When they do share, business people tend to prefer private channels like email far more than public platforms like Facebook.

The study comes as the FT is thinking about how it can increase the number of shares on its videos — and get its audience coming back for more.

Despite keeping its text behind a paywall, the FT’s video is free to access.

Currently, it creates about 200 video clips a month across platforms, including graphics, charts, Live, series and long-form features, opinion and 360 video.

collect
0
Joseph Cormier 2017-03-23
img

The Financial Times has launched a series championing a range of global FT readers, underlining the intrinsic value of its premium content while motioning at its global outlook.

A seven-part series, produced by film director Felipe P. Soares, stars an LA economist, a corporate comms Londoner, a law consultant from Singapore and an MIT professor in the US.

It documents the publication’s international premium appeal positioning it above the mass of quick-fire and free-to-access content that’s allegedly flooding the market and seizing all-important viewer retention.

On the video shorts, Darcy Keller, chief communications and marketing officer of the FT, told The Drum that the publication keeps a close eye on its readers, both, "anecdotally and in surveys".

The general impression is that the FT is "more than a paper they read and subscribe to, it’s part of their identity, it says something about them".

In the creation of the series, the publication put out a casting call for people who love and want to talk about the FT; their location, occupation and the story that they could tell all factored into the casting decision.

collect
0
Cedric Sams 2019-03-27
img

Here at the office, we’ve been working around the clock to bring in new features that’ll knock your socks off.

In terms of content, we have two new tracks that bring in a whole new aspect to the conversation on tech.

We’ve partnered with The Next Women to host a one-day summit about female empowerment.

Through women-led roundtables and keynotes, we’ll talk about the future of tech and share inspiring stories.

We’ve also partnered with Financial Times to create the Trade track, which focuses on the business of change and features speakers from Shell, Philips, and more.

I know I’ve fixated on this quite a bit, but that’s because I’m extremely excited!

collect
0
James Hammond 2020-08-20
img
LIBOR's days could be numbered - so what's next?
collect
0
Benny Parkhurst 2019-03-07
img

By now, you might have heard the news that TNW has sold a majority stake to the — and we don’t use this word lightly — venerable Financial Times.

For us, it’s an honor and a tremendous vote of confidence in our business.

Yesterday we put out a press release that announced the news and gave some basic details on the reasons and strategy behind it.

That’s nice, but we’re also a publisher with multiple ways of disseminating information.

One of those ways is our very own TNW Answers, a platform for real-time discussions between interesting people and our audience.

We decided to use this platform to offer our readers and anyone else who’s interested the chance to ask our founders Boris and Patrick anything they want.

collect
0
Jermaine Dusenbery 2017-11-16
img

The Financial Times’ fight against domain spoofing is paying off.

After catching 25 ad exchanges misrepresenting access to its inventory in September, the business news publisher took its fraud-fighting test a step further by purchasing counterfeit inventory that purported to be the FT’s to see which vendors were still selling fake FT impressions.

The publisher found that 24 of the 25 exchanges had stopped spoofing the FT’s domain since the publisher called out the tech vendors that were selling the mislabeled inventory, said Jessica Barrett, global head of programmatic at the Financial Times.

She wouldn’t say which vendor continues to misrepresent access to FT inventory.

“I was pleasantly surprised by how many exchanges were willing to work with us to fix this issue,” Barrett said, addressing the Digiday Programmatic Media Summit in New Orleans.

“It was much less worse than I originally anticipated.”

collect
0
Jarvis Lett 2021-04-02
Funding climate journalism is becoming less of an existential dilemma as more brands are waking up to the power of having a sustainable strategy--and turning to publishers to help. The Financial Times noticed the upswing in brands wanting to talk about their sustainability credentials over the last 24 months, when more mainstream advertisers including banks,...
collect
0
Filiberto Lahey 2017-07-31
img

The long tail of the BBC report that revealed major pay differences between genders

If an organizing idea behind a union is solidarity, then the reason for a potential strike by Financial Times employees represents a strong expression of that idea.

The possibility of a strike in this case arrives not because of new contract negotiations, but because of the inequities that currently exist, specifically in the difference between what men and women are paid at the publication.

to staff, FT editor and designer Steve Bird, who is head of the Financial Times’ union, said that FT’s almost 13 percent gender-pay gap is “the biggest shortfall in a decade.” The email continued:

[T]he company’s “ambition” to reach equality by 2022 is worse than the BBC’s present target of 2020.

Working for a private company where even the salaries of the editor and CEO are not disclosed does not inspire confidence in the FT’s commitment to transparency, and recent corporate statements seem more concerned about the commercial implications of gender bias than bringing women’s salaries into line with those of male counterparts.

collect
0
Daniel Patel 2017-09-14
img

For years, publishers and brands have had a contentious relationship with Facebook.

Brands took a huge hit two years ago when average organic reach on Facebook plummeted below two percent.

And publishers have struggled to figure out whether Facebook is a friend or foe when it comes to both relying on the site for traffic and promoting native advertising.

At the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity this summer, I interviewed Lexi Jarmon, director of FT , the Financial Times’ branded content studio, about the dynamics of that relationship.

Jarmon spoke about what true branded content success looks like and her biggest prediction for the next year.

Check out the video below, which was produced by Magnet Media, an industry-leading global strategic studio, as part of our Accountable Innovation Series.

collect
0
David Sandoval 2018-08-21
img

Ant Financial IPO plans pushed back again – Financial Times

What happened: Ant Financial has decided to push back its IPO plans again due to financial hurdles and pressure from government’s recent crackdown on non-traditional financial institutions.

The original expectations were that the company would file for an IPO sometime in this year, but people familiar with the matter were quoted as saying that a listing is unlikely before the end of 2019.

Why it’s important: The Alibaba affiliate was valued at $150 billion in its latest fundraising in June, which many investors thought paved the way for the highly-anticipated IPO.

However, the company’s first-quarter earnings revealed that it has been reporting losses lately amid rivalry with the payment services of Tencent.

Beijing has also been putting pressure on non-traditional financial institutions.

collect
0
David Carter 2017-04-17
img

The Financial Times is spending money to make money.

In the past month, the Nikkei-owned financial news publisher has launched two separate marketing campaigns, one for a new weekend product that offers digital access plus a print copy of the FT’s Saturday edition, as well as a separate brand campaign, “Black and White,” it produced with the help of Essence Digital.

Those join “Facts, Truths,” and a fourth reader-focused campaign that it launched with several broadcast partners in the UK.

Overall, the FT’s marketing expenditures are up 28 percent on consumer-facing campaigns and 30 percent on B2B campaigns year over year, making this the highest amount spent on marketing in years (it declined to share a hard dollar figure).

U.S. publishers like the Washington Post and the New York Times have been enjoying post-Trump subscriber surges, and in the U.K., Brexit’s begun driving gains anew since Prime Minister Theresa May signed Article 50 at the end of last month.

But the FT’s also motivated by a realization that its journalism is what drives subscriptions, and so it should be out front helping to sell it, thanks to programmatic targeting of prospective subscribers.

collect
0
Albert Hummel 2019-02-21
img

Our annual technology conference is fast approaching.

On May 9 and 10, we’ll bring together the brightest minds in the industry to discuss the future of tech, through inspiring keynotes, in-depth roundtable discussions, hands-on workshops, and more.

We’re very excited to announce our TNW2019 partnership with the Financial Times, the world’s leading global business publication.

Their expertise will help shape the conversation surrounding the future of technology and business.

TNW and the FT share a similar vision but different audiences – with this partnership we’re bringing them all together in Amsterdam at TNW2019.

We’re really excited about the key features that this will bring to the conference itself.

collect
0
Charles Pete 2017-05-26
img

p The Financial Times has been broadcasting stories through WhatsApp for the past year as a way of reaching new readers, growing loyalty and driving people back to the FT’s site, where they are more likely to subscribe.

During that time it has honed its content strategy to push out more specific market-related stories, rather than general news, and has found that people who access the FT’s journalism through WhatsApp are more likely to return to its site in the next seven days.

Some that have driven the most traffic have been “Why did the pound fall so fast?” “The five market charts that matter for investors” and “Banks begin moving some operations out of Britain.” Stories with charts also do particularly well.

The likelihood that readers from WhatsApp will return to the FT within the next seven days is 40 percent higher than the average (a global benchmark set by the FT), although it wouldn’t share absolute figures.

In January, after the number of WhatsApp users plateaued, the FT paused the account for a few months and surveyed its WhatsApp readers.

Tech-related stories, which are often trend analysis or longer features, performed less well than expected.

collect
0
Lucas Castillo 2017-07-26
img

The days of the good old trusty internal combustion engine, which revolutionised transportation but also maybe helped usher in a looming environmental apocalypse, may be numbered.

Reports in the Guardian and Financial Times both indicated the UK is set to ban the sale of all diesel and petrol-burning cars and vans by the year 2040 as part of an air quality plan, including hybrid vehicles.

If followed through, the plan would require all new cars and vans sold throughout the country to have purely electric engines.

A government spokesman told the Guardian, which said it was given access to parts of the proposal, the move was primarily related to concerns over air quality.

A recent government report concluded smog kills at least 40,000 people throughout the UK a year.

“Poor air quality is the biggest environmental risk to public health in the UK and this government is determined to take strong action in the shortest time possible,” the spokesman said.

collect
0
Larry Armitage 2019-01-19
img

Remember that in-car player device Spotify was reportedly developing last year?

It sounds like it's back on the agenda, with a potential launch happening some time in 2019 – bringing Spotify to your motor with no mobile phone required.

As per a Financial Times report, the tune-pumping add-on is going to offer voice control capabilities and cost you about $100 (that's roughly £75 or AU$140).

It'll sync with your car stereo via Bluetooth, apparently, and offer quick access to your favorite playlists, though it doesn't appear to have a touchscreen or any display of its own.

What isn't clear from the anonymous sources speaking to the Financial Times is whether it'll have any 4G/LTE connectivity powers on board, or whether you'll need to load it up with tunes before you leave the house.

It might also tether from a phone connection.

collect
0
Gailter stone 2021-11-21
It is also good to understand how an ac company chapel hill nc works in order to know when to call an ac company chapel hill nc. This knowledge will also help you know when is the proper time to call someone to repair your air conditioning unit. The answer to those questions will lead you to call an ac company chapel hill nc for your ac company chapel hill nc. If these situations are not rectified, you will be facing a very huge bill for your cooling services. This can lead to some tough financial times.
Joseph Cormier 2017-03-23
img

The Financial Times has launched a series championing a range of global FT readers, underlining the intrinsic value of its premium content while motioning at its global outlook.

A seven-part series, produced by film director Felipe P. Soares, stars an LA economist, a corporate comms Londoner, a law consultant from Singapore and an MIT professor in the US.

It documents the publication’s international premium appeal positioning it above the mass of quick-fire and free-to-access content that’s allegedly flooding the market and seizing all-important viewer retention.

On the video shorts, Darcy Keller, chief communications and marketing officer of the FT, told The Drum that the publication keeps a close eye on its readers, both, "anecdotally and in surveys".

The general impression is that the FT is "more than a paper they read and subscribe to, it’s part of their identity, it says something about them".

In the creation of the series, the publication put out a casting call for people who love and want to talk about the FT; their location, occupation and the story that they could tell all factored into the casting decision.

James Hammond 2020-08-20
img
LIBOR's days could be numbered - so what's next?
Jermaine Dusenbery 2017-11-16
img

The Financial Times’ fight against domain spoofing is paying off.

After catching 25 ad exchanges misrepresenting access to its inventory in September, the business news publisher took its fraud-fighting test a step further by purchasing counterfeit inventory that purported to be the FT’s to see which vendors were still selling fake FT impressions.

The publisher found that 24 of the 25 exchanges had stopped spoofing the FT’s domain since the publisher called out the tech vendors that were selling the mislabeled inventory, said Jessica Barrett, global head of programmatic at the Financial Times.

She wouldn’t say which vendor continues to misrepresent access to FT inventory.

“I was pleasantly surprised by how many exchanges were willing to work with us to fix this issue,” Barrett said, addressing the Digiday Programmatic Media Summit in New Orleans.

“It was much less worse than I originally anticipated.”

Filiberto Lahey 2017-07-31
img

The long tail of the BBC report that revealed major pay differences between genders

If an organizing idea behind a union is solidarity, then the reason for a potential strike by Financial Times employees represents a strong expression of that idea.

The possibility of a strike in this case arrives not because of new contract negotiations, but because of the inequities that currently exist, specifically in the difference between what men and women are paid at the publication.

to staff, FT editor and designer Steve Bird, who is head of the Financial Times’ union, said that FT’s almost 13 percent gender-pay gap is “the biggest shortfall in a decade.” The email continued:

[T]he company’s “ambition” to reach equality by 2022 is worse than the BBC’s present target of 2020.

Working for a private company where even the salaries of the editor and CEO are not disclosed does not inspire confidence in the FT’s commitment to transparency, and recent corporate statements seem more concerned about the commercial implications of gender bias than bringing women’s salaries into line with those of male counterparts.

David Sandoval 2018-08-21
img

Ant Financial IPO plans pushed back again – Financial Times

What happened: Ant Financial has decided to push back its IPO plans again due to financial hurdles and pressure from government’s recent crackdown on non-traditional financial institutions.

The original expectations were that the company would file for an IPO sometime in this year, but people familiar with the matter were quoted as saying that a listing is unlikely before the end of 2019.

Why it’s important: The Alibaba affiliate was valued at $150 billion in its latest fundraising in June, which many investors thought paved the way for the highly-anticipated IPO.

However, the company’s first-quarter earnings revealed that it has been reporting losses lately amid rivalry with the payment services of Tencent.

Beijing has also been putting pressure on non-traditional financial institutions.

Albert Hummel 2019-02-21
img

Our annual technology conference is fast approaching.

On May 9 and 10, we’ll bring together the brightest minds in the industry to discuss the future of tech, through inspiring keynotes, in-depth roundtable discussions, hands-on workshops, and more.

We’re very excited to announce our TNW2019 partnership with the Financial Times, the world’s leading global business publication.

Their expertise will help shape the conversation surrounding the future of technology and business.

TNW and the FT share a similar vision but different audiences – with this partnership we’re bringing them all together in Amsterdam at TNW2019.

We’re really excited about the key features that this will bring to the conference itself.

Lucas Castillo 2017-07-26
img

The days of the good old trusty internal combustion engine, which revolutionised transportation but also maybe helped usher in a looming environmental apocalypse, may be numbered.

Reports in the Guardian and Financial Times both indicated the UK is set to ban the sale of all diesel and petrol-burning cars and vans by the year 2040 as part of an air quality plan, including hybrid vehicles.

If followed through, the plan would require all new cars and vans sold throughout the country to have purely electric engines.

A government spokesman told the Guardian, which said it was given access to parts of the proposal, the move was primarily related to concerns over air quality.

A recent government report concluded smog kills at least 40,000 people throughout the UK a year.

“Poor air quality is the biggest environmental risk to public health in the UK and this government is determined to take strong action in the shortest time possible,” the spokesman said.

James Dixon 2017-03-23
img

The Financial Times wants to grow its video audience, but it’s got a problem: Business executives tend not to share video.

A new study from the FT, done with content-production company Alpha Grid, found just 10 percent of business executives in its sample shared video content regularly.

When they do share, business people tend to prefer private channels like email far more than public platforms like Facebook.

The study comes as the FT is thinking about how it can increase the number of shares on its videos — and get its audience coming back for more.

Despite keeping its text behind a paywall, the FT’s video is free to access.

Currently, it creates about 200 video clips a month across platforms, including graphics, charts, Live, series and long-form features, opinion and 360 video.

Cedric Sams 2019-03-27
img

Here at the office, we’ve been working around the clock to bring in new features that’ll knock your socks off.

In terms of content, we have two new tracks that bring in a whole new aspect to the conversation on tech.

We’ve partnered with The Next Women to host a one-day summit about female empowerment.

Through women-led roundtables and keynotes, we’ll talk about the future of tech and share inspiring stories.

We’ve also partnered with Financial Times to create the Trade track, which focuses on the business of change and features speakers from Shell, Philips, and more.

I know I’ve fixated on this quite a bit, but that’s because I’m extremely excited!

Benny Parkhurst 2019-03-07
img

By now, you might have heard the news that TNW has sold a majority stake to the — and we don’t use this word lightly — venerable Financial Times.

For us, it’s an honor and a tremendous vote of confidence in our business.

Yesterday we put out a press release that announced the news and gave some basic details on the reasons and strategy behind it.

That’s nice, but we’re also a publisher with multiple ways of disseminating information.

One of those ways is our very own TNW Answers, a platform for real-time discussions between interesting people and our audience.

We decided to use this platform to offer our readers and anyone else who’s interested the chance to ask our founders Boris and Patrick anything they want.

Jarvis Lett 2021-04-02
Funding climate journalism is becoming less of an existential dilemma as more brands are waking up to the power of having a sustainable strategy--and turning to publishers to help. The Financial Times noticed the upswing in brands wanting to talk about their sustainability credentials over the last 24 months, when more mainstream advertisers including banks,...
Daniel Patel 2017-09-14
img

For years, publishers and brands have had a contentious relationship with Facebook.

Brands took a huge hit two years ago when average organic reach on Facebook plummeted below two percent.

And publishers have struggled to figure out whether Facebook is a friend or foe when it comes to both relying on the site for traffic and promoting native advertising.

At the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity this summer, I interviewed Lexi Jarmon, director of FT , the Financial Times’ branded content studio, about the dynamics of that relationship.

Jarmon spoke about what true branded content success looks like and her biggest prediction for the next year.

Check out the video below, which was produced by Magnet Media, an industry-leading global strategic studio, as part of our Accountable Innovation Series.

David Carter 2017-04-17
img

The Financial Times is spending money to make money.

In the past month, the Nikkei-owned financial news publisher has launched two separate marketing campaigns, one for a new weekend product that offers digital access plus a print copy of the FT’s Saturday edition, as well as a separate brand campaign, “Black and White,” it produced with the help of Essence Digital.

Those join “Facts, Truths,” and a fourth reader-focused campaign that it launched with several broadcast partners in the UK.

Overall, the FT’s marketing expenditures are up 28 percent on consumer-facing campaigns and 30 percent on B2B campaigns year over year, making this the highest amount spent on marketing in years (it declined to share a hard dollar figure).

U.S. publishers like the Washington Post and the New York Times have been enjoying post-Trump subscriber surges, and in the U.K., Brexit’s begun driving gains anew since Prime Minister Theresa May signed Article 50 at the end of last month.

But the FT’s also motivated by a realization that its journalism is what drives subscriptions, and so it should be out front helping to sell it, thanks to programmatic targeting of prospective subscribers.

Charles Pete 2017-05-26
img

p The Financial Times has been broadcasting stories through WhatsApp for the past year as a way of reaching new readers, growing loyalty and driving people back to the FT’s site, where they are more likely to subscribe.

During that time it has honed its content strategy to push out more specific market-related stories, rather than general news, and has found that people who access the FT’s journalism through WhatsApp are more likely to return to its site in the next seven days.

Some that have driven the most traffic have been “Why did the pound fall so fast?” “The five market charts that matter for investors” and “Banks begin moving some operations out of Britain.” Stories with charts also do particularly well.

The likelihood that readers from WhatsApp will return to the FT within the next seven days is 40 percent higher than the average (a global benchmark set by the FT), although it wouldn’t share absolute figures.

In January, after the number of WhatsApp users plateaued, the FT paused the account for a few months and surveyed its WhatsApp readers.

Tech-related stories, which are often trend analysis or longer features, performed less well than expected.

Larry Armitage 2019-01-19
img

Remember that in-car player device Spotify was reportedly developing last year?

It sounds like it's back on the agenda, with a potential launch happening some time in 2019 – bringing Spotify to your motor with no mobile phone required.

As per a Financial Times report, the tune-pumping add-on is going to offer voice control capabilities and cost you about $100 (that's roughly £75 or AU$140).

It'll sync with your car stereo via Bluetooth, apparently, and offer quick access to your favorite playlists, though it doesn't appear to have a touchscreen or any display of its own.

What isn't clear from the anonymous sources speaking to the Financial Times is whether it'll have any 4G/LTE connectivity powers on board, or whether you'll need to load it up with tunes before you leave the house.

It might also tether from a phone connection.