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Alan Krieg 2018-03-14
img

Scientists have engineered perhaps the whitest natural substance, using the same physics behind one ghostly white Southeast Asian beetle.

Black-coloured things absorb nearly all of the light that strikes their surface, while white things send the light back, scattered equally at all wavelengths.

A team of European scientists have essentially created the whitest paper using this physical property.

“If you’re painting a wall white, you have to paint a few times,” study author Olimpia Onelli from the University of Cambridge told Gizmodo.

Unlike vantablack, which absorbs all light, a very white material would still show shadows or smudges.

Photo: Olivia Onelli (University of Cambridge)

collect
0
Daniel Slye 2021-01-15
img

Outlines $25bn of capex plus plans to expand in China

Taiwan’s silicon manufacturing titan TSMC has revealed it should be ready to produce chips using a three-nanometre process in 2022.…

collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2017-03-29
img

One month from today, a record-setting race will be held in Toulouse, France.

Teams from around the world will race nano-scale vehicles built from less than 100 individual atoms, at blistering speeds of up to five nanometers per hour.

To put that in perspective, it would take these microscopic cars almost 37 million years to drive a single mile.

Organised by the National Center for Scientific Research in France, the NanoCar Race, the first of its kind, will take place on a tiny highly-polished gold disc chilled to -454 degrees Fahrenheit, on tracks just 100 nanometers long.

So how will spectators and teams see all the action?

Through images created by the CNRS’ customised scanning tunnelling microscope that features four scanning tips for observing, and piloting, the incredibly tiny race cars.

collect
0
Clifford Ketcham 2018-09-03
img

Huawei launches advanced 7-nanometre smartphone chip ahead of Apple, Samsung – SCMP

What happened: World’s largest telecommunications equipment supplier Huawei unveiled its new smartphone chip, the Kirin 980, ahead of Apple and Samsung Electronics in launching a new integrated circuit.

Huawei’s new chip is a system on a chip built on the 7-nanometre fabrication process of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company.

The process will be used to power the new iPhone to be released in September.

Why it’s important: China has been promoting self-developed chips and a domestic semiconductor supply chain to become more competitive with US chip industry leaders.

More than 90 percent of the world’s smartphones, 65 percent of personal computers, 67 percent of smart televisions, are made in China.

collect
0
Jerrod Fenton 2016-10-17
img

View photosMoreThe logo of Samsung Electronics is seen at its headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, July 4, 2016.

SEOUL Reuters - Tech giant Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said on Monday its system chips business has started mass production of semiconductors using 10 nanometer technology, adding it was the first company in the industry to do so.

Samsung said in a statement a tech product launching early next year will use chips made with its 10-nanometre production technology without specifying the device.

South Korea's Electronic Times reported this month that Samsung will be the sole contract manufacturer of Qualcomm Inc's high-end Snapdragon 830 chips using 10-nanometre production technology and these processors will be used in half of Samsung's next Galaxy S smartphones expected to launch in early 2017.

collect
0
Jackie Brown 2018-08-28
img

Apple's A11 chip made last year's iPhones exceptional in terms of performance, and thanks to a new chip manufacturing process, we could be seeing another huge boost in 2018, according to Cult of Mac.

TSMC, the Taiwanese company that is exclusively manufacturing Apple's iPhone processors this year, is reportedly implementing a 7 nanometre process for 2018's devices, which should shrink the size of chips by around 30% when compared to the 10 nanometre process that was used on the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X.

Promising increased performance and decreased power consumption on its website, TSMC says its 7nm process is said to make the A12 chip 20% faster than last year's A11 chip and 40% more energy efficient.

The A12 chip's power consumption improvements should come as a welcome addition, given recent reports that the iPhone XI's battery might only be 10% bigger than last year's model.

Just how well these innovations will translate to real-world performance and battery life are obviously unknown at this point, although we should find out soon enough: Apple's expected to officially unveil its 2018 lineup in just a couple of weeks' time, on September 12.

collect
0
Jeffrey Zambrana 2016-06-02
img

John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences/Harvard University

A titanium dioxide metamaterial lens

It might be small, but it s a big feat.

In a normal lens, a curved glass surface a few millimetres or even centimetres thick redirects light rays to a common focal point.

To improve the image – say, to take out distortions, or make sure different wavelengths of light all get focused correctly – you have to keep adding glass layers.

As a result, cameras, microscopes and telescopes are limited in part by the size and heft of the lenses they require.

Tiny Stonehenge

Using a beam of electrons, the team carved nanofins – 600-nanometre-tall blocks that together resemble the world s smallest Stonehenge – out of a block of titanium dioxide.

Each could focus light more sharply than a 55-millimetre-thick Nikon microscope lens with similar optical properties – even though the 600-nanometre-thick metamaterial lens was 100,000 times thinner than the Nikon.

collect
0
Jeanne Hoffman 2019-10-15
img

Australian researchers have fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules, on a length scale of around one nanometre.

Molecular self-assembly on a metal results in a high-density, 2D, organic quantum-dot array with electric-field-controllable charge state, with the organic molecules used as 'nano-sized building blocks' in fabrication of functional nanomaterials.

The atomically-thin nanofilm consists of an ordered two-dimensional (2D) array of molecules which behave as 'zero dimensional' entities called quantum dots (QDs).

The School of Physics and Astronomy study shows that a single-component, self-assembled 2D array of the organic (carbon-based) molecule dicyanoanthracene can be synthesised on a metal, such that the charge state of each molecule can be controlled individually via an applied electric field.

QUANTUM DOTS: TINY, 'ZERO-DIMENSIONAL' POWERHOUSES

Quantum dots are extremely small - about one nanometre across (ie, a millionth of a millimetre).

collect
0
Betty Saliba 2021-02-16
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) A research team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) developed a high-resolution imaging method based on extreme short-wave UV light. It can be used to examine internal structures in semiconductors non-destructively, and with nanometre precision as the team reported in the current issue of the journal 'Optica'.
collect
0
Thomas Cann 2021-01-22
(University of Göttingen) Laser beams are used to change the properties of materials in an extremely precise way. However, the underlying processes generally take place at such unimaginably fast speeds and at such a small scale that they have so far eluded direct observation. Göttingen researchers have now managed to film, for the first time, the laser transformation of a crystal structure with nanometre resolution and in slow motion in an electron microscope. The results were published in Science.
collect
0
Jerry Miller 2021-04-15
(University of Groningen) Hafnium-based thin films, with a thickness of only a few nanometres, show an unconventional form of ferroelectricity. This allows the construction of nanometre-sized memories or logic devices. However, it was not clear how ferroelectricity could occur at this scale. A study that was led by scientists from the University of Groningen showed how atoms move in a hafnium-based capacitor: migrating oxygen atoms (or vacancies) are responsible for the observed switching and storage of charge.
collect
0
Michael Rase 2017-04-19
img

Samsung is now ready to produce faster and even more power-efficient chips than the ones it uses the latest Galaxy S8 smartphones.

These chips are faster than existing chips because of an enhanced 3D structure.

On average, the new chips made on the new process will be 10 percent faster and 15 percent more power efficient than the first wave of 10-nanometer chips like the Samsung Exynos 8895, which is one of two processors used in the S8 devices.

Samsung's announcement is a sign that it has received orders to make chips, said Jim McGregor, principal analyst at Tirias Research.

Samsung hasn't announced customers for the new chips.

But one client could be Qualcomm, which has its Snapdragon 835 chips in the Galaxy S8.

collect
0
Brian Christy 2017-05-04
img

p An engineer from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) has been arrested trying to leave the country for a new job in China.

Local reports say the engineer (the only name given is his surname, Hsu), has been charged with theft of trade secrets filed by the Hsinchu district prosecutor.

He was on the way to work for Shanghai-based Huali Microelectronics.

According to Taiwan News, Hsu was planning to pass on information about TSMC's 28 nanometre manufacturing process to Huali Microelectronics.

After Hsu's resignation in January, Taiwan News says TSMC discovered he was making “large scale” use of company photocopiers while serving out his notice.

Copied materials were later removed from his residence.

collect
0
Steven Condon 2018-04-27
img

Intel's 50th birthday in July should be a hell of a bash as the chipmaker is flush with cash and reckons 2018 might well be a record-breaking year.

Just don't mention two very little words: ten and nanometre.

In a conference call with Wall St analysts on Thursday, to mark the release of Intel's Q1 financial figures, CEO Brian Krzanich waxed lyrical about the processor giant's progress away from being a simple humble chip factory to a "data-centric" organization.

"Our transformation to a data-centric company continues to succeed," Mr Data-Centric told analysts on the call.

"Our data-centric business is up 25 per cent, with each division growing by double digits.

Here are the Q1 2018 results summarized:

collect
0
Everett Enriquez 2018-12-10
img

More details of Qualcomm’s first 5G chipset have been released, bringing all-round improvements, and a 5G chipset for PCs was also announced.

On the first day of its annual Snapdragon Technology Summit, Qualcomm announced its 5G chipset for mobile devices, the Snapdragon 855, but released limited specs.

In addition to the X50 modem for 5G connectivity (on both mmWave and sub-6GHz frequencies) and X24 modem (to provide LTE connectivity), at the centre of the Snapdragon 855 is ARM’s new flagship Cortex A76 CPU, marketed by Qualcomm as Kryo 485.

Also included in the 855 is the new Adreno 640 GPU rendering graphics.

Qualcomm claims the new GPU will enable true HDR gaming, as well as support the HDR10+ and Dolby Vision formats.

Together with the display IP, the Adreno 640 GPU will support 120fps gaming as well as smooth 8K 360-degree video playback.

collect
0
Mark Moore 2019-09-30
img

Silicon semiconductor technology has done marvels for the advancement of our society, who has benefited tremendously from its versatile use and amazing capabilities.

The development of electronics, automation, computers, digital cameras and recent smartphones based on this material and its underpinning technology has reached skyrocket limits, downscaling the physical size of devices and wires to the nanometre regime.

Although this technology has been developing since the late 1960s, the miniaturization of circuits seems to have reached a possible halt, since transistors can only be shrunk down to a certain size and not further beyond.

Thus, there is a pressing need to complement Si CMOS technology with new materials, and fulfil the future computing requirements as well as the needs for diversification of applications.

Now, graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) materials offer prospects of unprecedented advances in device performance at the atomic limit.

Their amazing potential has proven to be a possible solution to overcome the limitations of silicon technology, where the combination of 2D materials with silicon chips promises to surpass the current technological limitations.

collect
0
Alan Krieg 2018-03-14
img

Scientists have engineered perhaps the whitest natural substance, using the same physics behind one ghostly white Southeast Asian beetle.

Black-coloured things absorb nearly all of the light that strikes their surface, while white things send the light back, scattered equally at all wavelengths.

A team of European scientists have essentially created the whitest paper using this physical property.

“If you’re painting a wall white, you have to paint a few times,” study author Olimpia Onelli from the University of Cambridge told Gizmodo.

Unlike vantablack, which absorbs all light, a very white material would still show shadows or smudges.

Photo: Olivia Onelli (University of Cambridge)

Lamont Shaw 2017-03-29
img

One month from today, a record-setting race will be held in Toulouse, France.

Teams from around the world will race nano-scale vehicles built from less than 100 individual atoms, at blistering speeds of up to five nanometers per hour.

To put that in perspective, it would take these microscopic cars almost 37 million years to drive a single mile.

Organised by the National Center for Scientific Research in France, the NanoCar Race, the first of its kind, will take place on a tiny highly-polished gold disc chilled to -454 degrees Fahrenheit, on tracks just 100 nanometers long.

So how will spectators and teams see all the action?

Through images created by the CNRS’ customised scanning tunnelling microscope that features four scanning tips for observing, and piloting, the incredibly tiny race cars.

Jerrod Fenton 2016-10-17
img

View photosMoreThe logo of Samsung Electronics is seen at its headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, July 4, 2016.

SEOUL Reuters - Tech giant Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said on Monday its system chips business has started mass production of semiconductors using 10 nanometer technology, adding it was the first company in the industry to do so.

Samsung said in a statement a tech product launching early next year will use chips made with its 10-nanometre production technology without specifying the device.

South Korea's Electronic Times reported this month that Samsung will be the sole contract manufacturer of Qualcomm Inc's high-end Snapdragon 830 chips using 10-nanometre production technology and these processors will be used in half of Samsung's next Galaxy S smartphones expected to launch in early 2017.

Jeffrey Zambrana 2016-06-02
img

John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences/Harvard University

A titanium dioxide metamaterial lens

It might be small, but it s a big feat.

In a normal lens, a curved glass surface a few millimetres or even centimetres thick redirects light rays to a common focal point.

To improve the image – say, to take out distortions, or make sure different wavelengths of light all get focused correctly – you have to keep adding glass layers.

As a result, cameras, microscopes and telescopes are limited in part by the size and heft of the lenses they require.

Tiny Stonehenge

Using a beam of electrons, the team carved nanofins – 600-nanometre-tall blocks that together resemble the world s smallest Stonehenge – out of a block of titanium dioxide.

Each could focus light more sharply than a 55-millimetre-thick Nikon microscope lens with similar optical properties – even though the 600-nanometre-thick metamaterial lens was 100,000 times thinner than the Nikon.

Betty Saliba 2021-02-16
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) A research team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) developed a high-resolution imaging method based on extreme short-wave UV light. It can be used to examine internal structures in semiconductors non-destructively, and with nanometre precision as the team reported in the current issue of the journal 'Optica'.
Jerry Miller 2021-04-15
(University of Groningen) Hafnium-based thin films, with a thickness of only a few nanometres, show an unconventional form of ferroelectricity. This allows the construction of nanometre-sized memories or logic devices. However, it was not clear how ferroelectricity could occur at this scale. A study that was led by scientists from the University of Groningen showed how atoms move in a hafnium-based capacitor: migrating oxygen atoms (or vacancies) are responsible for the observed switching and storage of charge.
Brian Christy 2017-05-04
img

p An engineer from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) has been arrested trying to leave the country for a new job in China.

Local reports say the engineer (the only name given is his surname, Hsu), has been charged with theft of trade secrets filed by the Hsinchu district prosecutor.

He was on the way to work for Shanghai-based Huali Microelectronics.

According to Taiwan News, Hsu was planning to pass on information about TSMC's 28 nanometre manufacturing process to Huali Microelectronics.

After Hsu's resignation in January, Taiwan News says TSMC discovered he was making “large scale” use of company photocopiers while serving out his notice.

Copied materials were later removed from his residence.

Everett Enriquez 2018-12-10
img

More details of Qualcomm’s first 5G chipset have been released, bringing all-round improvements, and a 5G chipset for PCs was also announced.

On the first day of its annual Snapdragon Technology Summit, Qualcomm announced its 5G chipset for mobile devices, the Snapdragon 855, but released limited specs.

In addition to the X50 modem for 5G connectivity (on both mmWave and sub-6GHz frequencies) and X24 modem (to provide LTE connectivity), at the centre of the Snapdragon 855 is ARM’s new flagship Cortex A76 CPU, marketed by Qualcomm as Kryo 485.

Also included in the 855 is the new Adreno 640 GPU rendering graphics.

Qualcomm claims the new GPU will enable true HDR gaming, as well as support the HDR10+ and Dolby Vision formats.

Together with the display IP, the Adreno 640 GPU will support 120fps gaming as well as smooth 8K 360-degree video playback.

Daniel Slye 2021-01-15
img

Outlines $25bn of capex plus plans to expand in China

Taiwan’s silicon manufacturing titan TSMC has revealed it should be ready to produce chips using a three-nanometre process in 2022.…

Clifford Ketcham 2018-09-03
img

Huawei launches advanced 7-nanometre smartphone chip ahead of Apple, Samsung – SCMP

What happened: World’s largest telecommunications equipment supplier Huawei unveiled its new smartphone chip, the Kirin 980, ahead of Apple and Samsung Electronics in launching a new integrated circuit.

Huawei’s new chip is a system on a chip built on the 7-nanometre fabrication process of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company.

The process will be used to power the new iPhone to be released in September.

Why it’s important: China has been promoting self-developed chips and a domestic semiconductor supply chain to become more competitive with US chip industry leaders.

More than 90 percent of the world’s smartphones, 65 percent of personal computers, 67 percent of smart televisions, are made in China.

Jackie Brown 2018-08-28
img

Apple's A11 chip made last year's iPhones exceptional in terms of performance, and thanks to a new chip manufacturing process, we could be seeing another huge boost in 2018, according to Cult of Mac.

TSMC, the Taiwanese company that is exclusively manufacturing Apple's iPhone processors this year, is reportedly implementing a 7 nanometre process for 2018's devices, which should shrink the size of chips by around 30% when compared to the 10 nanometre process that was used on the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X.

Promising increased performance and decreased power consumption on its website, TSMC says its 7nm process is said to make the A12 chip 20% faster than last year's A11 chip and 40% more energy efficient.

The A12 chip's power consumption improvements should come as a welcome addition, given recent reports that the iPhone XI's battery might only be 10% bigger than last year's model.

Just how well these innovations will translate to real-world performance and battery life are obviously unknown at this point, although we should find out soon enough: Apple's expected to officially unveil its 2018 lineup in just a couple of weeks' time, on September 12.

Jeanne Hoffman 2019-10-15
img

Australian researchers have fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules, on a length scale of around one nanometre.

Molecular self-assembly on a metal results in a high-density, 2D, organic quantum-dot array with electric-field-controllable charge state, with the organic molecules used as 'nano-sized building blocks' in fabrication of functional nanomaterials.

The atomically-thin nanofilm consists of an ordered two-dimensional (2D) array of molecules which behave as 'zero dimensional' entities called quantum dots (QDs).

The School of Physics and Astronomy study shows that a single-component, self-assembled 2D array of the organic (carbon-based) molecule dicyanoanthracene can be synthesised on a metal, such that the charge state of each molecule can be controlled individually via an applied electric field.

QUANTUM DOTS: TINY, 'ZERO-DIMENSIONAL' POWERHOUSES

Quantum dots are extremely small - about one nanometre across (ie, a millionth of a millimetre).

Thomas Cann 2021-01-22
(University of Göttingen) Laser beams are used to change the properties of materials in an extremely precise way. However, the underlying processes generally take place at such unimaginably fast speeds and at such a small scale that they have so far eluded direct observation. Göttingen researchers have now managed to film, for the first time, the laser transformation of a crystal structure with nanometre resolution and in slow motion in an electron microscope. The results were published in Science.
Michael Rase 2017-04-19
img

Samsung is now ready to produce faster and even more power-efficient chips than the ones it uses the latest Galaxy S8 smartphones.

These chips are faster than existing chips because of an enhanced 3D structure.

On average, the new chips made on the new process will be 10 percent faster and 15 percent more power efficient than the first wave of 10-nanometer chips like the Samsung Exynos 8895, which is one of two processors used in the S8 devices.

Samsung's announcement is a sign that it has received orders to make chips, said Jim McGregor, principal analyst at Tirias Research.

Samsung hasn't announced customers for the new chips.

But one client could be Qualcomm, which has its Snapdragon 835 chips in the Galaxy S8.

Steven Condon 2018-04-27
img

Intel's 50th birthday in July should be a hell of a bash as the chipmaker is flush with cash and reckons 2018 might well be a record-breaking year.

Just don't mention two very little words: ten and nanometre.

In a conference call with Wall St analysts on Thursday, to mark the release of Intel's Q1 financial figures, CEO Brian Krzanich waxed lyrical about the processor giant's progress away from being a simple humble chip factory to a "data-centric" organization.

"Our transformation to a data-centric company continues to succeed," Mr Data-Centric told analysts on the call.

"Our data-centric business is up 25 per cent, with each division growing by double digits.

Here are the Q1 2018 results summarized:

Mark Moore 2019-09-30
img

Silicon semiconductor technology has done marvels for the advancement of our society, who has benefited tremendously from its versatile use and amazing capabilities.

The development of electronics, automation, computers, digital cameras and recent smartphones based on this material and its underpinning technology has reached skyrocket limits, downscaling the physical size of devices and wires to the nanometre regime.

Although this technology has been developing since the late 1960s, the miniaturization of circuits seems to have reached a possible halt, since transistors can only be shrunk down to a certain size and not further beyond.

Thus, there is a pressing need to complement Si CMOS technology with new materials, and fulfil the future computing requirements as well as the needs for diversification of applications.

Now, graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) materials offer prospects of unprecedented advances in device performance at the atomic limit.

Their amazing potential has proven to be a possible solution to overcome the limitations of silicon technology, where the combination of 2D materials with silicon chips promises to surpass the current technological limitations.