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Sean Biro 2019-04-25
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Mozambique is still recovering from deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai, and a second powerful tropical cyclone has now made landfall in the country.

As NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth making landfall in northern Mozambique.

It caused catastrophic flooding, landslides, and large numbers of casualties across Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe.

Intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth made landfall today, April 25, in northern Mozambique.

Over night of April 24 and 25, intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth was observed by three satellites including Suomi NPP, NOAA's NOAA-20 and the GCOM-W1 satellite.

Each provided several unique points of view of the storm.

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Thomas Park 2018-04-04
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The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Iris' heavy rainfall as it lingered near the Queensland coast.

Tropical Cyclone Iris has taken a long, fluctuating and serpentine trek since the tropical cyclone formed in the Coral Sea northeast of Australia on March 24.

The tropical low moved toward the northeastern coast of Australia and was upgraded again to Tropical Cyclone Iris on April 2.

This analysis using data collected by Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments shows that extremely heavy rain was falling west of Iris' center of circulation.

?GPM's GMI and DPR provided excellent coverage of the tropical cyclone.

GPM's radar probed convective storms with heavy precipitation as it scanned Iris' western side.

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Mark Moore 2018-01-16
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NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and saw Tropical Cyclone Berguitta moving southwest toward the island of Mauritius.

A tropical cyclone alert class 2 is in effect for Mauritius.

On Jan.14, Tropical cyclone Berguitta formed and triggered warnings A class III tropical cyclone alert is in force for Rodrigues Island.

On Jan. 16 at 1:10 a.m. EST (0610 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible light image of Berguitta.

The imagery showed the storm has taken on the classic comma shape of a strong tropical cyclone.

A dense overcast were seen over the eye, which was surrounded by powerful bands of thunderstorms and a large, thick band of thunderstorms extended from west of the center to the southeast.

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0
Eric Calvillo 2017-12-01
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On Nov. 29 Tropical Cyclone Dahlia became the first tropical cyclone of the 2017-2018 Southwest Indian Ocean season.

The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite provided forecasters with a look inside the clouds and into the rate rain was falling.

The next day, Dahlia was moving toward the southeast and was passing to the south of the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra with wind speeds of about 35 kts (40.3 mph).

Tropical cyclone Dahlia was passing over the warm ocean waters (28 to 29 degrees Celsius) of the Indian Ocean.

On November 29, 2017 at 12:31 p.m. EST (1731 UTC) NASA's GPM Core Observatory satellite passed above forming tropical cyclone Dahlia.

Data collected by GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments revealed the locations of heavy rainfall around the tropical cyclone.

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Joseph Averitt 2018-01-31
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NASA analyzed a major tropical cyclone spinning in the Southwestern Indian Ocean and measured its rainfall.

On January 27, Tropical Cyclone Cebile formed in the southwest Indian Ocean southeast of Diego Garcia.

On January 31, Tropical Cyclone Cebile became the most powerful tropical cyclone to form in the southern hemisphere this year.

Maximum sustained wind speeds were estimated at 120 knots (138 mph) early in the day making Cebile the equivalent of a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale.

The GPM core observatory satellite passed directly above the well-defined circular eye of Tropical Cyclone Cebile on January 31, 2018 at 0034 UTC.

Rainfall intensity and coverage within Cebile were revealed by GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments.

collect
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Richard Skaggs 2018-03-09
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Tropical Cyclone Hola was dropping heavy rainfall on Vanuatu and New Caledonia when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead.

In New Caledonia, the territory is on pre-alert, with the exception of Ouvéa, Maré and Lifou, which are on tropical cyclone alert 2.

The GPM core observatory satellite had a fairly good look at powerful Tropical Cyclone Hola on March 8, 2018 at 3:12 a.m. EST (0812 UTC).

Hola was located northeast of New Caledonia with maximum sustained winds of about 95 knots (~ 105 mph).

The rainfall rate was derived from GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments.

GPM's GMI provided the best coverage of the tropical cyclone.

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Bob Sun 2018-03-02
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Infrared imagery provides valuable temperature data in storms, and when NASA's Aqua satellite flew over newly developed Tropical Cyclone 11S in the Southern Indian Ocean, its gathered that data allowing forecasters to see where the strongest storms were located within.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer is the instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite that provided the infrared data on Tropical Cyclone 11S.

Imagery from March 2 at 5:05 a.m. EST (10:05 UTC) showed coldest cloud top temperatures in storms circling the low-level center of circulation and in a large fragmented band of thunderstorms in the northern quadrant on the tropical cyclone.

Temperatures in those areas were as cold as minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 Celsius).Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms that have the capability to create heavy rain.

On March 2 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) Tropical Cyclone 11S had maximum sustained winds are near 45 knots (52 mph/74 kph).

Tropical Cyclone 11S is expected to rapidly intensify by 55 knots (63 mph/102 kph) in 48 hours because of warm waters and low vertical wind shear.

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Victor Mcbride 2018-03-15
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NASA got an inside look at the heavy rainfall within developing Tropical cyclone Eliakim.

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall rates as it passed over the Southern Indian Ocean.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) has been keeping an eye on an area of convection in the Indian Ocean northeast of Madagascar.

Early on March 14, Tropical cyclone Eliakim developed.

Tropical cyclone Dumazile also caused extensive flooding less than two weeks ago when it passed close to the eastern side of Madagascar.

NASA's GPM core observatory satellite viewed the latest forming tropical cyclone when it flew over the Indian Ocean northeast of Madagascar on March 14, 2018 at 0228 UTC (March 13 at 10:28 p.m. EDT).

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Mark Alexander 2018-05-24
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Tropical Cyclone Mekunu, the second tropical cyclone in less than a week, formed in the western Arabian Sea early on May 22, 2018 and is moving toward a landfall in Oman.

NASA satellites provided an infrared, night-time and precipitation analysis of the storm.

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew above tropical Cyclone Mekunu in the Arabian Sea on May 22, 2018 at 2:06 p.m. EDT (1806 UTC).

GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments collected data that showed the intensity and location of precipitation within the intensifying tropical cyclone.

GPM's radar (DPR Ku Band) measured precipitation that was falling at a rate of almost 180 mm (7.1 inches) in a few powerful convective storms.

The 3-D cross-section view of the tropical cyclone's precipitation revealed that powerful convective storms southwest of Mekunu's center were reaching heights of about 16 km (9.9 miles).

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Jose Wenger 2018-04-02
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During the week of March 26 Tropical Cyclone Iris weakened to a low pressure area and since then it has been lingering off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the zombie storm after it was "re-born."

On April 2 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a true-color image of Iris.

The VIIRS image showed the center of circulation surrounded by a thick band of thunderstorms wrapping from the northeast to the southwest and into the low-level center.

True-color imagery is created by combining data from the three color channels on the VIIRS instrument sensitive to the red, green and blue (or RGB) wavelengths of light into one composite image.

On April 2, the Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology (ABM), Queensland Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre posted a Tropical cyclone watch for tropical cyclone Iris.

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James Woodson 2017-08-02
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That interaction, known as the Fujiwara Effect radically changed the direction and speed of tropical storm Irwin's movement.

The Fujiwara Effect happens when cyclones move close of one another.

Their centers will sometimes begin orbiting cyclonically (in the northern hemisphere) about a point between the two systems.

The larger tropical cyclone, Hilary in this case, often dominates the interaction.

The smaller tropical cyclone, Tropical Storm Irwin in this case, orbits around the larger tropical cyclone.

Sometimes the two tropical cyclones merge into one storm.

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Ruth Johnson 2019-03-11
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The Mozambique Channel is the body of water in the Southern Indian Ocean that flows between Mozambique on the African mainland and the island nation of Madagascar.

Tropical Cyclone Idai developed on March 9 around 4 a.m. EST (0900 UTC).

It developed from the low pressure area designated System 98S.

When it strengthened into a depression, it was renamed Tropical Cyclone 18S.

After strengthening into a tropical storm on March 10, it was renamed Idai.

On March 11, 2019, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Idai.

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Troy Jones 2018-01-31
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Tropical Cyclone Fehi has transitioned into an extra-tropical cyclone was wind shear pushed the bulk of clouds and thunderstorms south of its center.

NASA's Terra satellite and the NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM satellite confirmed the effect of wind shear as the storm triggered warnings in New Zealand.

The GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement Mission core observatory satellite flew over Tropical Cyclone Fehi on January 30, 2018 at 3:31 a.m. EST (0831 UTC).

Strong vertical wind shear had caused the surface center of circulation to be displaced well to the north of the heaviest rainfall.

The satellite found that some convective storms on the southern side of the tropical cyclone were still producing very heavy precipitation.

?GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments revealed rainfall in a few powerful storms on FEHI's southern side that were dropping rain at a rate of over 164 mm (6.5 inches) per hour.

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Charles Janow 2018-11-13
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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gaja.

Gaja formed on Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. EST (2100 UTC) as tropical cyclone 07B, about 569 miles south-southwest of Chittagong, Bangladesh.

It strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Gaja.

On Nov. 13, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite gathered data on Tropical Cyclone Gaja.

Gaja appeared somewhat elongated and had bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center.

Gaja appeared to extend over much of the Bay of Bengal in satellite imagery.

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Michael Ambriz 2018-04-11
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NASA satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Keni was being battered by vertical wind shear.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that wind shear was pushing the clouds and storms associated with Keni to the southeast of the center.

Keni is in an environment where vertical wind shear is strong, between 46 and 57 mph (40 and 50 knots/74 and 92 kph).

Sea surface temperatures are also too cool to help maintain a tropical cyclone.

A tropical cyclone needs sea surface temperatures as warm as 80 degrees Fahrenheit (26.6 degrees Celsius), and Keni is moving over waters only as warm as 25 degrees Celsius.

On April 11 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Keni as it continued moving south and away from Fiji in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

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Ralph Vandermeer 2018-02-07
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Vertical wind shear continued to hammer Tropical Cyclone Cebile in the Southern Pacific Ocean and NASA's GPM core satellite saw rainfall was pushed away from the center.

The GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core observatory satellite passed above weakening tropical cyclone Cebile on February 6, 2018 at 6:51 a.m. EST (1151 UTC).

The satellite showed that most of the convective rainfall in the sheared tropical cyclone was southeast of Cebile's center of circulation.

The Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instrument aboard GPM showed that the northeastern side of the eye wall was eroding while continuous heavy precipitation was found by GPM in the southeastern quadrant of the storm.

GPM found that powerful storms on the southern side of the tropical cyclone were still dropping rain at a rate of greater than 126.8 mm (4.99 inches) per hour.

GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

collect
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Sean Biro 2019-04-25
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Mozambique is still recovering from deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai, and a second powerful tropical cyclone has now made landfall in the country.

As NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth making landfall in northern Mozambique.

It caused catastrophic flooding, landslides, and large numbers of casualties across Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe.

Intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth made landfall today, April 25, in northern Mozambique.

Over night of April 24 and 25, intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth was observed by three satellites including Suomi NPP, NOAA's NOAA-20 and the GCOM-W1 satellite.

Each provided several unique points of view of the storm.

Mark Moore 2018-01-16
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NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and saw Tropical Cyclone Berguitta moving southwest toward the island of Mauritius.

A tropical cyclone alert class 2 is in effect for Mauritius.

On Jan.14, Tropical cyclone Berguitta formed and triggered warnings A class III tropical cyclone alert is in force for Rodrigues Island.

On Jan. 16 at 1:10 a.m. EST (0610 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible light image of Berguitta.

The imagery showed the storm has taken on the classic comma shape of a strong tropical cyclone.

A dense overcast were seen over the eye, which was surrounded by powerful bands of thunderstorms and a large, thick band of thunderstorms extended from west of the center to the southeast.

Joseph Averitt 2018-01-31
img

NASA analyzed a major tropical cyclone spinning in the Southwestern Indian Ocean and measured its rainfall.

On January 27, Tropical Cyclone Cebile formed in the southwest Indian Ocean southeast of Diego Garcia.

On January 31, Tropical Cyclone Cebile became the most powerful tropical cyclone to form in the southern hemisphere this year.

Maximum sustained wind speeds were estimated at 120 knots (138 mph) early in the day making Cebile the equivalent of a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale.

The GPM core observatory satellite passed directly above the well-defined circular eye of Tropical Cyclone Cebile on January 31, 2018 at 0034 UTC.

Rainfall intensity and coverage within Cebile were revealed by GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments.

Bob Sun 2018-03-02
img

Infrared imagery provides valuable temperature data in storms, and when NASA's Aqua satellite flew over newly developed Tropical Cyclone 11S in the Southern Indian Ocean, its gathered that data allowing forecasters to see where the strongest storms were located within.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer is the instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite that provided the infrared data on Tropical Cyclone 11S.

Imagery from March 2 at 5:05 a.m. EST (10:05 UTC) showed coldest cloud top temperatures in storms circling the low-level center of circulation and in a large fragmented band of thunderstorms in the northern quadrant on the tropical cyclone.

Temperatures in those areas were as cold as minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 Celsius).Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms that have the capability to create heavy rain.

On March 2 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) Tropical Cyclone 11S had maximum sustained winds are near 45 knots (52 mph/74 kph).

Tropical Cyclone 11S is expected to rapidly intensify by 55 knots (63 mph/102 kph) in 48 hours because of warm waters and low vertical wind shear.

Mark Alexander 2018-05-24
img

Tropical Cyclone Mekunu, the second tropical cyclone in less than a week, formed in the western Arabian Sea early on May 22, 2018 and is moving toward a landfall in Oman.

NASA satellites provided an infrared, night-time and precipitation analysis of the storm.

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew above tropical Cyclone Mekunu in the Arabian Sea on May 22, 2018 at 2:06 p.m. EDT (1806 UTC).

GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments collected data that showed the intensity and location of precipitation within the intensifying tropical cyclone.

GPM's radar (DPR Ku Band) measured precipitation that was falling at a rate of almost 180 mm (7.1 inches) in a few powerful convective storms.

The 3-D cross-section view of the tropical cyclone's precipitation revealed that powerful convective storms southwest of Mekunu's center were reaching heights of about 16 km (9.9 miles).

James Woodson 2017-08-02
img

That interaction, known as the Fujiwara Effect radically changed the direction and speed of tropical storm Irwin's movement.

The Fujiwara Effect happens when cyclones move close of one another.

Their centers will sometimes begin orbiting cyclonically (in the northern hemisphere) about a point between the two systems.

The larger tropical cyclone, Hilary in this case, often dominates the interaction.

The smaller tropical cyclone, Tropical Storm Irwin in this case, orbits around the larger tropical cyclone.

Sometimes the two tropical cyclones merge into one storm.

Troy Jones 2018-01-31
img

Tropical Cyclone Fehi has transitioned into an extra-tropical cyclone was wind shear pushed the bulk of clouds and thunderstorms south of its center.

NASA's Terra satellite and the NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM satellite confirmed the effect of wind shear as the storm triggered warnings in New Zealand.

The GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement Mission core observatory satellite flew over Tropical Cyclone Fehi on January 30, 2018 at 3:31 a.m. EST (0831 UTC).

Strong vertical wind shear had caused the surface center of circulation to be displaced well to the north of the heaviest rainfall.

The satellite found that some convective storms on the southern side of the tropical cyclone were still producing very heavy precipitation.

?GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments revealed rainfall in a few powerful storms on FEHI's southern side that were dropping rain at a rate of over 164 mm (6.5 inches) per hour.

Michael Ambriz 2018-04-11
img

NASA satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Keni was being battered by vertical wind shear.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that wind shear was pushing the clouds and storms associated with Keni to the southeast of the center.

Keni is in an environment where vertical wind shear is strong, between 46 and 57 mph (40 and 50 knots/74 and 92 kph).

Sea surface temperatures are also too cool to help maintain a tropical cyclone.

A tropical cyclone needs sea surface temperatures as warm as 80 degrees Fahrenheit (26.6 degrees Celsius), and Keni is moving over waters only as warm as 25 degrees Celsius.

On April 11 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Keni as it continued moving south and away from Fiji in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

Thomas Park 2018-04-04
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The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Iris' heavy rainfall as it lingered near the Queensland coast.

Tropical Cyclone Iris has taken a long, fluctuating and serpentine trek since the tropical cyclone formed in the Coral Sea northeast of Australia on March 24.

The tropical low moved toward the northeastern coast of Australia and was upgraded again to Tropical Cyclone Iris on April 2.

This analysis using data collected by Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments shows that extremely heavy rain was falling west of Iris' center of circulation.

?GPM's GMI and DPR provided excellent coverage of the tropical cyclone.

GPM's radar probed convective storms with heavy precipitation as it scanned Iris' western side.

Eric Calvillo 2017-12-01
img

On Nov. 29 Tropical Cyclone Dahlia became the first tropical cyclone of the 2017-2018 Southwest Indian Ocean season.

The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite provided forecasters with a look inside the clouds and into the rate rain was falling.

The next day, Dahlia was moving toward the southeast and was passing to the south of the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra with wind speeds of about 35 kts (40.3 mph).

Tropical cyclone Dahlia was passing over the warm ocean waters (28 to 29 degrees Celsius) of the Indian Ocean.

On November 29, 2017 at 12:31 p.m. EST (1731 UTC) NASA's GPM Core Observatory satellite passed above forming tropical cyclone Dahlia.

Data collected by GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments revealed the locations of heavy rainfall around the tropical cyclone.

Richard Skaggs 2018-03-09
img

Tropical Cyclone Hola was dropping heavy rainfall on Vanuatu and New Caledonia when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead.

In New Caledonia, the territory is on pre-alert, with the exception of Ouvéa, Maré and Lifou, which are on tropical cyclone alert 2.

The GPM core observatory satellite had a fairly good look at powerful Tropical Cyclone Hola on March 8, 2018 at 3:12 a.m. EST (0812 UTC).

Hola was located northeast of New Caledonia with maximum sustained winds of about 95 knots (~ 105 mph).

The rainfall rate was derived from GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments.

GPM's GMI provided the best coverage of the tropical cyclone.

Victor Mcbride 2018-03-15
img

NASA got an inside look at the heavy rainfall within developing Tropical cyclone Eliakim.

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed rainfall rates as it passed over the Southern Indian Ocean.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) has been keeping an eye on an area of convection in the Indian Ocean northeast of Madagascar.

Early on March 14, Tropical cyclone Eliakim developed.

Tropical cyclone Dumazile also caused extensive flooding less than two weeks ago when it passed close to the eastern side of Madagascar.

NASA's GPM core observatory satellite viewed the latest forming tropical cyclone when it flew over the Indian Ocean northeast of Madagascar on March 14, 2018 at 0228 UTC (March 13 at 10:28 p.m. EDT).

Jose Wenger 2018-04-02
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During the week of March 26 Tropical Cyclone Iris weakened to a low pressure area and since then it has been lingering off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the zombie storm after it was "re-born."

On April 2 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a true-color image of Iris.

The VIIRS image showed the center of circulation surrounded by a thick band of thunderstorms wrapping from the northeast to the southwest and into the low-level center.

True-color imagery is created by combining data from the three color channels on the VIIRS instrument sensitive to the red, green and blue (or RGB) wavelengths of light into one composite image.

On April 2, the Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology (ABM), Queensland Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre posted a Tropical cyclone watch for tropical cyclone Iris.

Ruth Johnson 2019-03-11
img

The Mozambique Channel is the body of water in the Southern Indian Ocean that flows between Mozambique on the African mainland and the island nation of Madagascar.

Tropical Cyclone Idai developed on March 9 around 4 a.m. EST (0900 UTC).

It developed from the low pressure area designated System 98S.

When it strengthened into a depression, it was renamed Tropical Cyclone 18S.

After strengthening into a tropical storm on March 10, it was renamed Idai.

On March 11, 2019, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Idai.

Charles Janow 2018-11-13
img

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gaja.

Gaja formed on Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. EST (2100 UTC) as tropical cyclone 07B, about 569 miles south-southwest of Chittagong, Bangladesh.

It strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Gaja.

On Nov. 13, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite gathered data on Tropical Cyclone Gaja.

Gaja appeared somewhat elongated and had bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center.

Gaja appeared to extend over much of the Bay of Bengal in satellite imagery.

Ralph Vandermeer 2018-02-07
img

Vertical wind shear continued to hammer Tropical Cyclone Cebile in the Southern Pacific Ocean and NASA's GPM core satellite saw rainfall was pushed away from the center.

The GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core observatory satellite passed above weakening tropical cyclone Cebile on February 6, 2018 at 6:51 a.m. EST (1151 UTC).

The satellite showed that most of the convective rainfall in the sheared tropical cyclone was southeast of Cebile's center of circulation.

The Dual Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instrument aboard GPM showed that the northeastern side of the eye wall was eroding while continuous heavy precipitation was found by GPM in the southeastern quadrant of the storm.

GPM found that powerful storms on the southern side of the tropical cyclone were still dropping rain at a rate of greater than 126.8 mm (4.99 inches) per hour.

GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.