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Adam Amie 2021-07-06
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A new federal facility in Kansas will house the deadliest agricultural pathogens in the world—and researchers working tirelessly to contain them.
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Adam Amie 2021-03-15
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Need a new 4K TV to watch the NCAA tournament? These March Madness Hisense TV might have just what you need.
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Adam Amie 2020-09-18
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A principled, hands-off approach to the internet was easier to defend in the 1990s. Today it makes no sense.
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Adam Amie 2019-11-05
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Instead, they come from the follow-up novel La Belle Sauvage, showing Lord Asriel (James McAvoy) bringing baby Lyra to the Master at Jordan College, invoking “scholastic sanctuary” to keep her safe.

Fast-forward several years later, and Lyra (Dafne Keen) is now a young girl, galavanting around Jordan College with her daemon, Pantalaimon, and her best friend, Roger.

The world of His Dark Materials is both like and unlike our own, where human souls take on animal forms called daemons.

As children, the daemons can shift at will, until they settle into a single form once they reach puberty.

We spend some time with Lord Asriel as he makes his big discovery about “Dust” and the strange city in the Northern Lights.

He delights in every scene, oozing confidence, arrogance, and a dark power that not even he understands.

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Adam Amie 2021-07-02
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"The company's mission to 'democratize finance for all' is similar to Pablo Escobar saying his mission was to 'democratize cocaine.'"
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Adam Amie 2021-01-13
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With more suction power and smart technology that can detect surface types, this is a top cordless vacuum.
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Adam Amie 2020-07-23
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Section 230 gives platforms like YouTube broad immunity for user content.
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Adam Amie 2019-08-04
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Gaming accessories company Razer and electric vehicle manufacturer Nio have teamed up for a limited-edition electric SUV.

The Nio ES6 Night Explorer Limited Edition integrates Razer’s signature design into the Nio ES6 Performance Edition.

The electric SUV features a maximum output of 544 horsepower, 0-100 km/h in 4.7 seconds, and a braking distance of 33.9 meters from 100-0 km/h.

The limited-edition electric SUV comes with Razer’s logo and trim, carbon fiber decals, green calipers, and a custom rear emblem.

Only 88 units of the Nio ES6 Night Explorer Limited Edition will be manufactured, with sales starting in China for 467,800 yuan, or about $67,400.

The electric SUV made its debut at the 2019 ChinaJoy, the largest gaming and digital entertainment expo in Asia.

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Adam Amie 2021-05-21
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"I would not feel really comfortable if I was anyone that had committed a crime with" Joel Greenberg right now, one former FBI agent told Insider.
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Adam Amie 2021-01-11
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Business Insider's top advertising and media stories for January 12.
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Adam Amie 2020-07-23
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We’ve come a long way in recent years when it comes to talking about mental health ― but there remains so, so much more people need to learn.

The proof is in the Twitter discourse occurring this week about Kanye West’s mental health. The artist, who in 2018 revealed he has bipolar disorder, held a rally in South Carolina over the weekend where he made a series of comments about slavery and abortion.

He has since posted a string of tweets, some of them seemingly addressing his family’s concern over his emotional wellbeing. West said his wife, Kim Kardashian West, and mother-in-law Kris Jenner “tried to fly in with 2 doctors to 51/50 me” (referring to the law for the temporary and involuntary psychiatric hold of individuals who present a danger to themselves or others due to signs of mental illness.) That tweet and many others have since been deleted.

West isn’t the only celebrity whose mental health has become a matter of public discussion lately. People also continue to speculate about Britney Spears’ well-being on her Instagram posts, where many users in comments continuously hurl insults about her mental health. 

While many people ― including celebrities ― posted well-intentioned thoughts on social media about West and Spears, others took the opportunity to meme and joke about their behaviour. Terms like “crazy” and “insane” are being thrown around.

The posts were uninformed at best, heartless and ignorant at worst.

The urge people have to post commentary on what’s happening in the world is a main reason Twitter, Instagram and other platforms exist. However, that impulse shouldn’t include a permission slip to be devoid of all compassion ― especially when it comes to mental health. Belittling mental illness to a meme or a quip on Twitter doesn’t make you funny, it makes you a jerk.

Some posts about rapper Kanye West's behavior this week are proof that many people still lack compassion about mental health.

An estimated 1 in 5 people experience a mental health condition in any one year (but given the global health crisis we’re in, who knows ― there could be an uptick in that). The stigma surrounding mental illness, especially serious mental illnesses like bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, often prevents people from seeking proper help. Disparaging remarks about a celebrity’s mental state on social media only intensify that stigma.

So if you feel compelled to comment on a public figure’s mental health in the future (or anyone’s for that matter), here’s a guide to consider before posting:

Don’t automatically equate certain behaviours with a person’s mental health status

Someone can make misogynistic, racist or absurd comments and not have a mental health issue. Someone can make them and also live with a mental illness.

“I want everyone to know that not all erratic behaviour means there’s a mental health concern. And some folks who appear ‘fine’ are living with mental health diagnoses,” said Racine Henry, a therapist and owner of Sankofa Marriage and Family Therapy in New York.

“Sometimes people do things without rhyme or reason and that is literally human nature,” Henry continued. “If you’re going to speak on mental health without knowing the topic intimately, you’re in no position to judge a complete stranger, no matter how many of their records you’ve bought or how long you’ve followed them on Instagram.”

Don’t diagnose

Most mental health professionals abide by the Goldwater Rule, which is an ethical standard designed to prevent therapists from diagnosing people who are not their patients, especially in the public. If these experts won’t make a conclusion about someone’s condition from afar, those just observing from outside of the mental health field shouldn’t either.

Not only that, you can be easily deceived by what you think you might be “witnessing,” Henry said.

“I want everyone to know that mental health diagnoses look very different than what you are assuming or even what you may have experienced personally or with someone you know,” Henry said. “It’s impossible to compare because the rules don’t apply across the board. Even when we make diagnoses as professionals, we rely on standard criteria but we also know people don’t fit neatly into categories.” 

Avoid stigmatising language

Words hold power. Using terms like “crazy,” “insane,” “overmedicated,” etc. in a casual manner can perpetuate negative stereotypes of mental illness. And those imprecise terms ignore the very real health problems someone might be experiencing.

“Labelling anyone is harmful because it minimises and dismisses their pain. Even among mental health professionals, those words are taboo and problematic,” Henry said. “Part of the problem we have with mental health as a society is that we talk about it and treat it as though it’s not germane to our overall health and wellbeing.”

“Nobody is crazy or insane,” Henry added. “There are people with mental illnesses and there are people with mental health diagnoses. All of whom deserve respect, adequate treatment and for their dignity to be observed.”

Learn from and lean on experts

“If you’re going to say something, do your research,” Henry said. “Better yet, listen to the actual professionals who have the training and experience to have the conversation.”

There are plenty of mental health professionals on social media who you can amplify during these types of conversations (here are a few accounts to start with). Educate yourself and your followers through their words and guidance.

Share resources

Mental health issues are invisible illnesses that can affect anyone, including your friends, family and followers ― whether or not you know it. So make comments like someone you love will read it. If you want to positively contribute to the conversation, try sharing mental health resources or stories about your own experiences. It also would be helpful to post crisis lines, guides on how to find affordable therapy or other outlets where people can get help.

Don’t blame anyone

In West’s case, some shifted the blame to Kardashian West for not getting him help or controlling the situation. Others chastised West for not accepting help.

“We need to stop placing blame on the people around them and the person in question, as well,” Henry said. “Mental illness is nobody’s fault and nobody can control another human being.”

You can also just ... not hit post

If you can’t do any of the above, this is a good option. HuffPost editor Phil Lewis summed it up best:

Henry also underscored this point. “I think it’s better to not comment, in most cases,” she said. “We don’t know what that person struggles with every day. We don’t know what their traumas are, even though we assume to know everything about public figures and we don’t know what kind of progress they are making.”

When in doubt, log off, take care of your own mental health and be kind. 

Useful websites and helplines

Mind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.

Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).

CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.

The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected]

Rethink Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0300 5000 927 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.

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Adam Amie 2019-07-27
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Pillars of Eternity, the acclaimed RPG by Obsidian Entertainment, will roll out for the Nintendo Switch on August 8, just in time for the upcoming arrival of Pillars of Eternity II to consoles.

The Nintendo Switch version will be Pillars of Eternity: Complete Edition, which will include all updates and the two-part White March expansion, which extended the game, increased the level cap and introduced additional party members and abilities.

We are happy to announce that the original Pillars of Eternity adventure is coming to the Nintendo Switch on August 8th, complete with both of the White March expansions!

Pre-Orders are available now.https://t.co/lAaxl77V5e pic.twitter.com/m1dq7Z1a50

— Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire (@WorldofEternity) July 26, 2019

Obsidian, known for Fallout: New Vegas and South Park: The Stick of Truth, received much praise for Pillars of Eternity, which was first released for Windows PC, Mac, and Linux in 2015.

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Adam Amie 2021-05-06
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IBM has just made the world's first functioning 2nm processor, but what does that mean for our precious gaming PCs and Ultrabooks?
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Adam Amie 2020-10-22
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Hummer's electric pickup packs 1,000 horsepower, removable roof panels, four-wheel steering with CrabWalk mode and standard Super Cruise tech.
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Adam Amie 2020-07-21
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Listen to our weekly podcast Am I Making You Uncomfortable? about women’s health, bodies and private lives. Available on Spotify, Apple, Audioboom and wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Lockdown may be easing across the country, with pubs, shops and beauty salons reopening, but pregnant women say they feel they’ve been “forgotten”. 

Mums-to-be are still finding that routine antenatal appointments are being cancelled or conducted over the phone, HuffPost has heard, while many continue to face scans and difficult face-to-face appointments alone. 

Pregnant women have faced significant challenges throughout the pandemic, since they were classed as “vulnerable” in March and were told to abide by stricter social distancing measures. Things looked a little brighter in April, when the NHS set out a six-week plan to resume normal services across healthcare. 

But three months later, maternity services in some parts of the country are still heavily restricted and tight limits remain in place on partners attending scans, appointments – and even a baby’s birth. 

“I’ve had to attend everything on my own,” says Stacey Carley from Fleetwood near Blackpool, who is 37 weeks pregnant with her third child. In the past week, Carley, 33, who has experienced complications throughout the pregnancy, was told her daughter is too big and also breach, so will need to be delivered early. 

“I wish my partner had have been sat there. I wish anybody had been sat there, to be honest, just to hold my hand and say that it will be okay, but I had to sit there by myself,” she says. “I’ve got to go for an emergency scan at some point this week. He’s still not even allowed to attend that. It’s really upsetting.”

Stacey Carley

Carley accepts that tight regulations were needed on maternity and antenatal wards at the height of lockdown, but doesn’t understand why they’re still in place when other restrictions are easing. 

“You can go and get your hair done, you can go and sit in a pub, but you can’t have your partner with you while you’re having a baby. It’s just not logical,” she says. “I’ve had to go into all these appointments by myself and come out upset and tell him in the car. It’s not nice for him, either – he doesn’t want to hear this stuff in a car.” 

Fiona Hall, 32, from East Croydon, London, is 32 weeks pregnant with her first child and is worried that a lack of face-to-face contact with her midwife could mean vital information is missed. 

She had one in-person appointment at 10 weeks, but her 16-week appointment was conducted over the phone and lasted just a few minutes. “I didn’t know what to ask because I’ve never had a baby before. People need to be offering information and I found that that wasn’t really the case,” she says. 

Hall says a friend “mentioned in passing that you’re not meant to sleep on your back after a certain number of weeks”. Research shows the risk of stillbirth increases after 28 weeks for women who do so, according to the NHS.

“No one official has told me that – and I’m 32 weeks.”

Fiona Hall

Hall, who’s part of the Dope Black Mums community group, was able to attend her 12-week scan with her partner, but at the 20-week scan, he was told to wait in the corridor. Her next appointment, at 24 weeks, was cancelled by her GP surgery, who told her to contact her midwife team instead. 

“For weeks I couldn’t get an appointment because they just didn’t answer the phone, so I had no 24-week appointment, it just passed,” she says. “No one checked on me, no one called, no blood test, no blood pressure check.”

Blood pressure is usually checked at every antenatal visit during pregnancy, but Hall didn’t have hers checked between week 10 and week 28 of pregnancy, when she eventually got through to the midwives. 

“That’s a long time, especially for a first-time mum who doesn’t know what’s happening, not just in regards to blood pressure, but in terms of having that assistance and having those conversations,” she says.

“No one has spoken to me about alternatives for birthing classes or breast feeding tuition, or anything like that. I’ve been floating for the longest time.”

No one checked on me, no one called, no blood test, no blood pressure check

Hall has fibroids and doesn’t yet know if she’ll require a C-section instead of a vaginal birth. So far, her partner has not been permitted to attend any of the appointments where these options have been explained and discussed – and she doesn’t know how long he’ll be allowed to stay with her after the birth. “It’s extremely distressing to me, the possibility of having to have my partner leave straight away after birth,” she says.  

Kerry Langley, 35, from Hertford, Hertfordshire, is 35 weeks pregnant. She also accepted the restrictions at first, telling herself, “it’s going to be a bit shitty, but you’ll be alright.” But at her 20-week scan, she was told she wasn’t even allowed to video call her partner – and that’s when her frustrations started. 

When she asked the sonographer why, she was told a video call would go  against the data protection rules at the hospital. 

“On the news and everywhere there is NHS staff doing TikTok videos. You can see the inside of the hospital pretty clearly. How does that work?’ I just think this is more important than a bloody TikTok,” she says. 

Langley’s partner has two children from a previous relationship, while she has one from a previous relationship. This current pregnancy is their first child together but the couple say like they’re not able to enjoy it as a family.

“This is going to be our only baby together – four is enough, I can’t do five – so we won’t have this experience again,” she says. “He keeps saying to me: ‘I know you’re carrying the baby, but that is still my baby – why am I less important than you?’ And I agree, I haven’t got the answer.”

Kerry Langley

Langley is booked in for a C-section and her partner will be present for the delivery and allowed to stay for a couple of hours while she’s in recovery. However, the couple have been told he won’t be allowed on the ward, where she’ll stay with the baby for the rest of the day and overnight.  

“It was the other day that it really hit me and I thought: ‘Oh my goodness, that’s going to be horrible’. I know the staff will be amazing – don’t get me wrong, this is never anything towards the NHS staff – but at the end of the day, I want my partner there,” she says. “I’m upset about it, as it’s getting nearer the time, and as all these other restrictions are being lifted, it’s upsetting me more.”

Langley understands the need to kickstart the economy, but says that seeing people stagger out of pubs, when her antenatal appointments have been so restricted, is increasingly difficult. 

“It makes me feel frustrated and it makes me feel like me and my partner and all the other pregnant ladies have been forgotten about,” she says. 

A fourth woman who spoke to HuffPost UK and wished to remain anonymous, said her partner hasn’t been allowed to attend any of her scans which has been “really difficult” after she experienced a missed miscarriage in January, which was only picked up at a routine scan.

“Knowing I had to do the whole appointment process – taxis, waiting surrounded by other pregnant women, the actual scan – without the support of my partner added a lot of anxiety into the lead up to the appointments,” the 37-year-old from London says.

“I couldn’t help but think if we were allowed in Primark together, why not for a scan appointment with proper precautions?

“My partner also felt the same way, mostly helpless as he just had to wait for the information alone at home. And then when the scans went well, there wasn’t the one person I wanted to be there to share the overwhelming joy with.”

The midwives and technicians have been extremely supportive during each appointment, the mum-to-be adds, but she’s still frustrated by the situation. 

“I couldn’t help but think if we were allowed in Primark together, why not for a scan appointment with proper precautions? Especially because our hospital’s maternity wing is separate from the rest of the hospital.”

HuffPost UK has contacted NHS England for comment on the experiences of  the women we spoke to and details of when normal services are expected to resume. We will update this article when we receive a response. 

In the meantime, the uncertain end to restrictions is making a difficult situation even harder for women approaching their due date. “The anxiety of being pregnant during a pandemic is high anyway and our mental health has suffered,” says Stacey Carley. “I don’t understand why we can’t have someone with us still.

“We’re all taking precautions – using hand sanitiser and masks and doing everything we can – plus I live with my partner. They say you can mix with six other people outside your household, so why is he not allowed to come in? We need that support.”

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Adam Amie 2019-07-15
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There’s a kind of boom and bust cycle that tends to follow the development of every new technology, or every major societal change.

People get excited about the possibilities of the shiny new concept, they dump money into stocks, they start businesses in the industry, and they push public enthusiasm even higher.

It’s easiest to see this pattern through the lens of incidents past, so let’s take a look at a reasonable counterpart: the dotcom bubble of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

It was only a matter of time before the overinflated prices started to fall, and after a wave of panic selling, it led to a full-fledged economic crash.

Of course, this clearly didn’t mean the internet was a fad—it truly was a game-changing technology, and there were hundreds of online businesses that survived the dotcom crash, including modern tech overlords like Google and Amazon.

Average people, regardless of how they personally feel about the legalization of marijuana, tend to see legalization at a sweeping progression that can’t be stopped; someday soon, any adult will be able to legally buy weed the way they buy alcohol or tobacco today.

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Adam Amie 2021-07-06
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A new federal facility in Kansas will house the deadliest agricultural pathogens in the world—and researchers working tirelessly to contain them.
Adam Amie 2021-05-21
img
"I would not feel really comfortable if I was anyone that had committed a crime with" Joel Greenberg right now, one former FBI agent told Insider.
Adam Amie 2021-03-15
img
Need a new 4K TV to watch the NCAA tournament? These March Madness Hisense TV might have just what you need.
Adam Amie 2021-01-11
img
Business Insider's top advertising and media stories for January 12.
Adam Amie 2020-09-18
img
A principled, hands-off approach to the internet was easier to defend in the 1990s. Today it makes no sense.
Adam Amie 2020-07-23
img

We’ve come a long way in recent years when it comes to talking about mental health ― but there remains so, so much more people need to learn.

The proof is in the Twitter discourse occurring this week about Kanye West’s mental health. The artist, who in 2018 revealed he has bipolar disorder, held a rally in South Carolina over the weekend where he made a series of comments about slavery and abortion.

He has since posted a string of tweets, some of them seemingly addressing his family’s concern over his emotional wellbeing. West said his wife, Kim Kardashian West, and mother-in-law Kris Jenner “tried to fly in with 2 doctors to 51/50 me” (referring to the law for the temporary and involuntary psychiatric hold of individuals who present a danger to themselves or others due to signs of mental illness.) That tweet and many others have since been deleted.

West isn’t the only celebrity whose mental health has become a matter of public discussion lately. People also continue to speculate about Britney Spears’ well-being on her Instagram posts, where many users in comments continuously hurl insults about her mental health. 

While many people ― including celebrities ― posted well-intentioned thoughts on social media about West and Spears, others took the opportunity to meme and joke about their behaviour. Terms like “crazy” and “insane” are being thrown around.

The posts were uninformed at best, heartless and ignorant at worst.

The urge people have to post commentary on what’s happening in the world is a main reason Twitter, Instagram and other platforms exist. However, that impulse shouldn’t include a permission slip to be devoid of all compassion ― especially when it comes to mental health. Belittling mental illness to a meme or a quip on Twitter doesn’t make you funny, it makes you a jerk.

Some posts about rapper Kanye West's behavior this week are proof that many people still lack compassion about mental health.

An estimated 1 in 5 people experience a mental health condition in any one year (but given the global health crisis we’re in, who knows ― there could be an uptick in that). The stigma surrounding mental illness, especially serious mental illnesses like bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, often prevents people from seeking proper help. Disparaging remarks about a celebrity’s mental state on social media only intensify that stigma.

So if you feel compelled to comment on a public figure’s mental health in the future (or anyone’s for that matter), here’s a guide to consider before posting:

Don’t automatically equate certain behaviours with a person’s mental health status

Someone can make misogynistic, racist or absurd comments and not have a mental health issue. Someone can make them and also live with a mental illness.

“I want everyone to know that not all erratic behaviour means there’s a mental health concern. And some folks who appear ‘fine’ are living with mental health diagnoses,” said Racine Henry, a therapist and owner of Sankofa Marriage and Family Therapy in New York.

“Sometimes people do things without rhyme or reason and that is literally human nature,” Henry continued. “If you’re going to speak on mental health without knowing the topic intimately, you’re in no position to judge a complete stranger, no matter how many of their records you’ve bought or how long you’ve followed them on Instagram.”

Don’t diagnose

Most mental health professionals abide by the Goldwater Rule, which is an ethical standard designed to prevent therapists from diagnosing people who are not their patients, especially in the public. If these experts won’t make a conclusion about someone’s condition from afar, those just observing from outside of the mental health field shouldn’t either.

Not only that, you can be easily deceived by what you think you might be “witnessing,” Henry said.

“I want everyone to know that mental health diagnoses look very different than what you are assuming or even what you may have experienced personally or with someone you know,” Henry said. “It’s impossible to compare because the rules don’t apply across the board. Even when we make diagnoses as professionals, we rely on standard criteria but we also know people don’t fit neatly into categories.” 

Avoid stigmatising language

Words hold power. Using terms like “crazy,” “insane,” “overmedicated,” etc. in a casual manner can perpetuate negative stereotypes of mental illness. And those imprecise terms ignore the very real health problems someone might be experiencing.

“Labelling anyone is harmful because it minimises and dismisses their pain. Even among mental health professionals, those words are taboo and problematic,” Henry said. “Part of the problem we have with mental health as a society is that we talk about it and treat it as though it’s not germane to our overall health and wellbeing.”

“Nobody is crazy or insane,” Henry added. “There are people with mental illnesses and there are people with mental health diagnoses. All of whom deserve respect, adequate treatment and for their dignity to be observed.”

Learn from and lean on experts

“If you’re going to say something, do your research,” Henry said. “Better yet, listen to the actual professionals who have the training and experience to have the conversation.”

There are plenty of mental health professionals on social media who you can amplify during these types of conversations (here are a few accounts to start with). Educate yourself and your followers through their words and guidance.

Share resources

Mental health issues are invisible illnesses that can affect anyone, including your friends, family and followers ― whether or not you know it. So make comments like someone you love will read it. If you want to positively contribute to the conversation, try sharing mental health resources or stories about your own experiences. It also would be helpful to post crisis lines, guides on how to find affordable therapy or other outlets where people can get help.

Don’t blame anyone

In West’s case, some shifted the blame to Kardashian West for not getting him help or controlling the situation. Others chastised West for not accepting help.

“We need to stop placing blame on the people around them and the person in question, as well,” Henry said. “Mental illness is nobody’s fault and nobody can control another human being.”

You can also just ... not hit post

If you can’t do any of the above, this is a good option. HuffPost editor Phil Lewis summed it up best:

Henry also underscored this point. “I think it’s better to not comment, in most cases,” she said. “We don’t know what that person struggles with every day. We don’t know what their traumas are, even though we assume to know everything about public figures and we don’t know what kind of progress they are making.”

When in doubt, log off, take care of your own mental health and be kind. 

Useful websites and helplines

Mind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.

Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).

CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.

The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected]

Rethink Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0300 5000 927 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.

Adam Amie 2019-11-05
img

Instead, they come from the follow-up novel La Belle Sauvage, showing Lord Asriel (James McAvoy) bringing baby Lyra to the Master at Jordan College, invoking “scholastic sanctuary” to keep her safe.

Fast-forward several years later, and Lyra (Dafne Keen) is now a young girl, galavanting around Jordan College with her daemon, Pantalaimon, and her best friend, Roger.

The world of His Dark Materials is both like and unlike our own, where human souls take on animal forms called daemons.

As children, the daemons can shift at will, until they settle into a single form once they reach puberty.

We spend some time with Lord Asriel as he makes his big discovery about “Dust” and the strange city in the Northern Lights.

He delights in every scene, oozing confidence, arrogance, and a dark power that not even he understands.

Adam Amie 2019-07-27
img

Pillars of Eternity, the acclaimed RPG by Obsidian Entertainment, will roll out for the Nintendo Switch on August 8, just in time for the upcoming arrival of Pillars of Eternity II to consoles.

The Nintendo Switch version will be Pillars of Eternity: Complete Edition, which will include all updates and the two-part White March expansion, which extended the game, increased the level cap and introduced additional party members and abilities.

We are happy to announce that the original Pillars of Eternity adventure is coming to the Nintendo Switch on August 8th, complete with both of the White March expansions!

Pre-Orders are available now.https://t.co/lAaxl77V5e pic.twitter.com/m1dq7Z1a50

— Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire (@WorldofEternity) July 26, 2019

Obsidian, known for Fallout: New Vegas and South Park: The Stick of Truth, received much praise for Pillars of Eternity, which was first released for Windows PC, Mac, and Linux in 2015.

Adam Amie 2021-07-02
img
"The company's mission to 'democratize finance for all' is similar to Pablo Escobar saying his mission was to 'democratize cocaine.'"
Adam Amie 2021-05-06
img
IBM has just made the world's first functioning 2nm processor, but what does that mean for our precious gaming PCs and Ultrabooks?
Adam Amie 2021-01-13
img
With more suction power and smart technology that can detect surface types, this is a top cordless vacuum.
Adam Amie 2020-10-22
img
Hummer's electric pickup packs 1,000 horsepower, removable roof panels, four-wheel steering with CrabWalk mode and standard Super Cruise tech.
Adam Amie 2020-07-23
img
Section 230 gives platforms like YouTube broad immunity for user content.
Adam Amie 2020-07-21
img

Listen to our weekly podcast Am I Making You Uncomfortable? about women’s health, bodies and private lives. Available on Spotify, Apple, Audioboom and wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Lockdown may be easing across the country, with pubs, shops and beauty salons reopening, but pregnant women say they feel they’ve been “forgotten”. 

Mums-to-be are still finding that routine antenatal appointments are being cancelled or conducted over the phone, HuffPost has heard, while many continue to face scans and difficult face-to-face appointments alone. 

Pregnant women have faced significant challenges throughout the pandemic, since they were classed as “vulnerable” in March and were told to abide by stricter social distancing measures. Things looked a little brighter in April, when the NHS set out a six-week plan to resume normal services across healthcare. 

But three months later, maternity services in some parts of the country are still heavily restricted and tight limits remain in place on partners attending scans, appointments – and even a baby’s birth. 

“I’ve had to attend everything on my own,” says Stacey Carley from Fleetwood near Blackpool, who is 37 weeks pregnant with her third child. In the past week, Carley, 33, who has experienced complications throughout the pregnancy, was told her daughter is too big and also breach, so will need to be delivered early. 

“I wish my partner had have been sat there. I wish anybody had been sat there, to be honest, just to hold my hand and say that it will be okay, but I had to sit there by myself,” she says. “I’ve got to go for an emergency scan at some point this week. He’s still not even allowed to attend that. It’s really upsetting.”

Stacey Carley

Carley accepts that tight regulations were needed on maternity and antenatal wards at the height of lockdown, but doesn’t understand why they’re still in place when other restrictions are easing. 

“You can go and get your hair done, you can go and sit in a pub, but you can’t have your partner with you while you’re having a baby. It’s just not logical,” she says. “I’ve had to go into all these appointments by myself and come out upset and tell him in the car. It’s not nice for him, either – he doesn’t want to hear this stuff in a car.” 

Fiona Hall, 32, from East Croydon, London, is 32 weeks pregnant with her first child and is worried that a lack of face-to-face contact with her midwife could mean vital information is missed. 

She had one in-person appointment at 10 weeks, but her 16-week appointment was conducted over the phone and lasted just a few minutes. “I didn’t know what to ask because I’ve never had a baby before. People need to be offering information and I found that that wasn’t really the case,” she says. 

Hall says a friend “mentioned in passing that you’re not meant to sleep on your back after a certain number of weeks”. Research shows the risk of stillbirth increases after 28 weeks for women who do so, according to the NHS.

“No one official has told me that – and I’m 32 weeks.”

Fiona Hall

Hall, who’s part of the Dope Black Mums community group, was able to attend her 12-week scan with her partner, but at the 20-week scan, he was told to wait in the corridor. Her next appointment, at 24 weeks, was cancelled by her GP surgery, who told her to contact her midwife team instead. 

“For weeks I couldn’t get an appointment because they just didn’t answer the phone, so I had no 24-week appointment, it just passed,” she says. “No one checked on me, no one called, no blood test, no blood pressure check.”

Blood pressure is usually checked at every antenatal visit during pregnancy, but Hall didn’t have hers checked between week 10 and week 28 of pregnancy, when she eventually got through to the midwives. 

“That’s a long time, especially for a first-time mum who doesn’t know what’s happening, not just in regards to blood pressure, but in terms of having that assistance and having those conversations,” she says.

“No one has spoken to me about alternatives for birthing classes or breast feeding tuition, or anything like that. I’ve been floating for the longest time.”

No one checked on me, no one called, no blood test, no blood pressure check

Hall has fibroids and doesn’t yet know if she’ll require a C-section instead of a vaginal birth. So far, her partner has not been permitted to attend any of the appointments where these options have been explained and discussed – and she doesn’t know how long he’ll be allowed to stay with her after the birth. “It’s extremely distressing to me, the possibility of having to have my partner leave straight away after birth,” she says.  

Kerry Langley, 35, from Hertford, Hertfordshire, is 35 weeks pregnant. She also accepted the restrictions at first, telling herself, “it’s going to be a bit shitty, but you’ll be alright.” But at her 20-week scan, she was told she wasn’t even allowed to video call her partner – and that’s when her frustrations started. 

When she asked the sonographer why, she was told a video call would go  against the data protection rules at the hospital. 

“On the news and everywhere there is NHS staff doing TikTok videos. You can see the inside of the hospital pretty clearly. How does that work?’ I just think this is more important than a bloody TikTok,” she says. 

Langley’s partner has two children from a previous relationship, while she has one from a previous relationship. This current pregnancy is their first child together but the couple say like they’re not able to enjoy it as a family.

“This is going to be our only baby together – four is enough, I can’t do five – so we won’t have this experience again,” she says. “He keeps saying to me: ‘I know you’re carrying the baby, but that is still my baby – why am I less important than you?’ And I agree, I haven’t got the answer.”

Kerry Langley

Langley is booked in for a C-section and her partner will be present for the delivery and allowed to stay for a couple of hours while she’s in recovery. However, the couple have been told he won’t be allowed on the ward, where she’ll stay with the baby for the rest of the day and overnight.  

“It was the other day that it really hit me and I thought: ‘Oh my goodness, that’s going to be horrible’. I know the staff will be amazing – don’t get me wrong, this is never anything towards the NHS staff – but at the end of the day, I want my partner there,” she says. “I’m upset about it, as it’s getting nearer the time, and as all these other restrictions are being lifted, it’s upsetting me more.”

Langley understands the need to kickstart the economy, but says that seeing people stagger out of pubs, when her antenatal appointments have been so restricted, is increasingly difficult. 

“It makes me feel frustrated and it makes me feel like me and my partner and all the other pregnant ladies have been forgotten about,” she says. 

A fourth woman who spoke to HuffPost UK and wished to remain anonymous, said her partner hasn’t been allowed to attend any of her scans which has been “really difficult” after she experienced a missed miscarriage in January, which was only picked up at a routine scan.

“Knowing I had to do the whole appointment process – taxis, waiting surrounded by other pregnant women, the actual scan – without the support of my partner added a lot of anxiety into the lead up to the appointments,” the 37-year-old from London says.

“I couldn’t help but think if we were allowed in Primark together, why not for a scan appointment with proper precautions?

“My partner also felt the same way, mostly helpless as he just had to wait for the information alone at home. And then when the scans went well, there wasn’t the one person I wanted to be there to share the overwhelming joy with.”

The midwives and technicians have been extremely supportive during each appointment, the mum-to-be adds, but she’s still frustrated by the situation. 

“I couldn’t help but think if we were allowed in Primark together, why not for a scan appointment with proper precautions? Especially because our hospital’s maternity wing is separate from the rest of the hospital.”

HuffPost UK has contacted NHS England for comment on the experiences of  the women we spoke to and details of when normal services are expected to resume. We will update this article when we receive a response. 

In the meantime, the uncertain end to restrictions is making a difficult situation even harder for women approaching their due date. “The anxiety of being pregnant during a pandemic is high anyway and our mental health has suffered,” says Stacey Carley. “I don’t understand why we can’t have someone with us still.

“We’re all taking precautions – using hand sanitiser and masks and doing everything we can – plus I live with my partner. They say you can mix with six other people outside your household, so why is he not allowed to come in? We need that support.”

Adam Amie 2019-08-04
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Gaming accessories company Razer and electric vehicle manufacturer Nio have teamed up for a limited-edition electric SUV.

The Nio ES6 Night Explorer Limited Edition integrates Razer’s signature design into the Nio ES6 Performance Edition.

The electric SUV features a maximum output of 544 horsepower, 0-100 km/h in 4.7 seconds, and a braking distance of 33.9 meters from 100-0 km/h.

The limited-edition electric SUV comes with Razer’s logo and trim, carbon fiber decals, green calipers, and a custom rear emblem.

Only 88 units of the Nio ES6 Night Explorer Limited Edition will be manufactured, with sales starting in China for 467,800 yuan, or about $67,400.

The electric SUV made its debut at the 2019 ChinaJoy, the largest gaming and digital entertainment expo in Asia.

Adam Amie 2019-07-15
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There’s a kind of boom and bust cycle that tends to follow the development of every new technology, or every major societal change.

People get excited about the possibilities of the shiny new concept, they dump money into stocks, they start businesses in the industry, and they push public enthusiasm even higher.

It’s easiest to see this pattern through the lens of incidents past, so let’s take a look at a reasonable counterpart: the dotcom bubble of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

It was only a matter of time before the overinflated prices started to fall, and after a wave of panic selling, it led to a full-fledged economic crash.

Of course, this clearly didn’t mean the internet was a fad—it truly was a game-changing technology, and there were hundreds of online businesses that survived the dotcom crash, including modern tech overlords like Google and Amazon.

Average people, regardless of how they personally feel about the legalization of marijuana, tend to see legalization at a sweeping progression that can’t be stopped; someday soon, any adult will be able to legally buy weed the way they buy alcohol or tobacco today.