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Adrian Bray 2021-07-26
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All levels of industry and government told to get moving, consumers encouraged to buy new Wi-Fi routers

China's Central Cyberspace Affairs Commission and Cyberspace Administration have set out a plan for massive adoption of IPv6.…

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0
Adrian Bray 2021-03-31
img
Keen to see monsters punch each other? You've come to the right place.
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0
Adrian Bray 2021-01-27
img
US Navy aircraft carriers, and the array of aircraft they bring with them, have become essential to US power projection.
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0
Adrian Bray 2020-08-17
img
Committing to living in the end times.
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0
Adrian Bray 2021-05-29
img
There are deals on the best streaming stick, our favorite sunglasses, and dozens of other WIRED top picks this holiday weekend.
collect
0
Adrian Bray 2021-03-01
img
Gatorade, the company you best know for its sports drinks, has launched a single-use wearable patch that, when used with its companion app, can analyze an athlete’s sweat and provide them with a ‘unique sweat profile.’ According to Gatorade, the Gx Sweat Patch is the first wearable of its kind to hit the market, one ultimately intended to ‘help inform … Continue reading
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Adrian Bray 2021-01-15
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Ahead of the federal holiday celebrating the birthday of the civil rights leader, here are materials to help educate all ages about the fight for racial justice.
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0
Adrian Bray 2020-08-01
img

FILE PHOTO: 2018 Vanity Fair Oscar Party – Arrivals – Beverly Hills, California, U.S., 04/03/2018 –  Amazon CEO Jeff and wife MacKenzie Bezos. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

  • MacKenzie Scott (formerly MacKenzie Bezos) announced Wednesday that she had donated $1.7 billion to 116 different organizations tackling a variety of social issues.
  • By Friday afternoon, the value of her stake in Amazon had grown so much that she is is now richer than she was before the gift, according to CNBC's Robert Frank.
  • Scott, an author by trade, became a billionaire following her 2019 divorce from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Scott received 25% of Bezos' stake in the e-commerce giant, minus voting control, after helping him found the company in 1997.
  • Scott has a net worth of $60.8 billion, per Bloomberg's latest available estimate.
  • The value of Amazon shares has skyrocketed during the pandemic, helping Bezos' net worth reach new all-time highs, too.
  • The $1.7 billion gift is likely only the start of Scott's philanthropic efforts. She signed the Giving Pledge in 2019.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

SEE ALSO: Jeff Bezos is about to defend his Amazon empire before Congress. Here's how the richest person in the world makes and spends his $178 billion fortune.

DON'T MISS: The founders of Panda Express built a $3 billion fortune off of the Chinese food empire. Here's why the first-generation immigrants say the key to achieving the American dream is giving back.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

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Adrian Bray 2021-05-09
img

They were not the cloud we were looking for, says DoD in brief to Supreme Court

In another chapter to a saga that refuses to die, the US government has recommended [PDF] that the Supreme Court rejects Oracle’s efforts to overturn a Department of Defense decision to award the $10bn JEDI contract to Microsoft.…

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0
Adrian Bray 2021-02-19
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Michael Kellogg is defending the Saudi government and its royals in US courts at a time when the kingdom's reputation has never been worse.
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0
Adrian Bray 2020-10-20
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I discovered the brilliant secret behind how to create an evergreen webinar – one that will live on forever. And it’s addicting. I’ve become so obsessed with this webinars that some people at work now refer to me as the “Webinar Queen.” If you don’t believe…

The post How to Create an Evergreen Webinar – The Perfect Guide to Automated Webinars appeared first on Growth Marketing Pro.

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Adrian Bray 2019-11-08
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Beak denies wrongdoing in baffling malware probe case

A judge in the US state of Georgia is facing hacking charges after she allegedly hired private investigators to look into what she believed was a spyware infection on her office computer.

Lawyers for Judge Kathryn Schrader are challenging a September indictment of three counts of computer trespass against herself and three gumshoes she recruited to monitor her work PC.

According to legal publication the Daily Report this week, the charges stem from a February incident in which Schrader allegedly brought in private dick TJ Ward to determine whether or not spyware had been placed on her office computer by Gwinnett County District Attorney Danny Porter.

Ward, in turn, hired computer consultants Ed Kramer and Frank Karic to examine Schrader's machine, it is claimed.

In an effort to root out any potential surveillance-ware on the machine, they installed the open-source packet sniffer Wireshark to inspect Schrader's network connectivity, it is alleged.

collect
0
Adrian Bray 2021-04-04
img
Does the smaller, less-feature-rich OnePlus 8 deserve your cash, or should you stick to the true flagship?
collect
0
Adrian Bray 2021-02-03
Photo by Sean Hollister / The Verge

The Securities and Exchange Commission is looking into whether misinformation posted on social media was used to boost the stocks of GameStop and AMC, according to Bloomberg. The commission is also said to be reviewing trading data as part of its probe into potential market manipulation.

This inquiry comes a week after shares in GameStop and AMC, among other companies, were sent soaring, largely thanks to support from Reddit’s r/WallStreetBets community. The community is ostensibly composed of small-time, amateur traders, but there’s been speculation as to whether some of the members of the community — which describes itself as “like 4chan found a Bloomberg terminal” — may in fact have been professional investors looking to capitalize on...

Continue reading…

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Adrian Bray 2020-09-02
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You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.

Confidence trick?

“What the people of this country want to see is their representatives back on their seats as fast as possible in the Palace of Westminster,” Boris Johnson declared in PMQs.

The PM was trying to ridicule a Labour MP for appearing via video link, but to the onlooker it felt more like a desperate plea for help: if there were more bums on seats in a “normal” chamber packed with roaring Tory backbenchers, perhaps Keir Starmer wouldn’t look like he was winning every week.

Without the sheer wall of noise an 80-strong majority can give a sitting premier, Johnson has for some months now been stripped of the safety net he could previously use whenever he was exposed on the floor of the House. And with a maximum of 50 MPs allowed at a time, it’s been much easier to hear the Labour leader’s courtroom cross-examination.‌

So far, so predictable. What was different this week however was that Starmer channelled some genuine anger (after the PM accused him of somehow being pro-IRA). Moreover, Speaker Hoyle had decided Johnson could no longer get away with such cheap shots when he was being asked about serious matters like the summer exams fiasco and serial U-turns.

Proving just how better prepared they are these days, Labour then went on the attack, pointing out that it was Johnson himself who had allowed a peerage for Claire Fox, the ex-Brexit Party MEP whose former Revolutionary Communist Party had praised IRA terror just days after the Warrington bomb killed 12-year-old Tim Parry.

The worrying thing for Tory MPs may well be that the PM has himself become predictable, but not in a good way. He simply didn’t look like he had put in the prep needed for this bout with Starmer. His lines about his opponent being a Remainer, being iffy on the IRA and simply being ‘Captain Hindsight’ on Covid all fell flat because they sounded like the evasions they were. And in a socially distanced Commons, they were applause lines without the applause.‌

Those who fear Johnson really is suffering from memory lapses due to ‘long Covid’ would not have been reassured when he claimed that Starmer’s belief that “school is safe” was the first time he had said so in PMQs. He had in fact said so in June 24. If the PM isn’t putting in the work and is forgetting basic facts for PMQs, is he putting in the work and forgetting basic facts in running the country?

The schools jibe felt like Johnson was also trying to fight the last war (he did have some success in making Starmer squirm earlier this summer on the reopenings), not the coming one. But even an attempt to repeat the trick, suggesting Starmer was equivocal over a return to the workplace, didn’t land either.

As it happens, I’ve been passed a memo from Unite the union to its HQ employees, from chief of staff Andrew Murray, which sets out why they should “return to office-based working as from September 1”. “Hundreds of thousands of our members have been working in workplaces throughout, and more are returning every day. It is therefore time, given the government relaxation of restrictions, that the union was back in the office too,” the memo (sent at the end of July) stated.

Sadly for Johnson, he didn’t have that memo as ammo. But even if he had, he had no evidence that Starmer is opposed to people going back to Covid-secure workplaces. Moreover, it’s his own cabinet ministers like Matt Hancock and Grant Shapps who have been saying what matters most is how well workers are performing, rather than where they are located.

Johnson would also dearly have loved to deploy the ‘culture war’ weapon of the Proms saga, but news of the BBC’s own U-turn on singing the lyrics to Rule Britannia came too late. Yet even on this Starmer is far too shrewd to gift him a dividing line, his spokesman telling us that he liked the “pomp and pageantry” of the Proms and the Beeb had finally made the right decision.

It was on furlough however that the PM himself sounded most vulnerable. His flip line that the millions on the scheme were “languishing” “in suspended animation” felt like an echo of the ill-judged claims that furloughed staff are just “sitting” at home. Many of those workers feel like they’re living on redundancy death row, not living it up with pina coladas.

Johnson’s most jarring line though was that “an ounce of confidence is worth a ton of taxpayers’ money”. Breezy confidence from a leader only works if the public are, well, confident in their leader’s competence and the recent U-turns (not least the Bolton/Trafford lockdown) have undermined that far more than anything his critics could say.

In his meeting with 2019 intake MPs, the PM kept saying he wanted to get back as close to normal as possible as soon as possible. That impatience for former certainties was telling. Yet a return to life before Covid looks as likely as a return to life before Starmer. Instead of going back to the future, Johnson is going to have to come up with new ways to deal with his new twin realities.

Quote Of The Day

“I do think this country is going through an orgy of national embarrassment about some of the things that other people around the world love most about us.”

Boris Johnson on someone else’s U-turn for a change: the BBC’s on the Proms

Wednesday Cheat Sheet

Chancellor Rishi Sunak told Tory backbenchers his Budget plan “doesn’t mean a horror show of tax rises with no end in sight”. But many suspect he will impose temporary hikes, just as Labour said a recession is the wrong time to put up taxes. Therese Coffey even said tax cuts could actually increase a tax take.

Roger Taylor, chair of schools regulator Ofqual, told the education select committee that Gavin Williamson had unilaterally decided to scrap exams this summer. It had also briefed No.10 on August 7 of the risks to disadvantaged students of an algorithm model.

The new Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (already dubbed FOCADO) was launched with Dominic Raab warning he would not ditch the 0.7% GDP aid policy. “We are here, day one, we are committed to it, it is in law, it is part of our manifesto.”

The GMB trade union is “institutionally sexist”, a damning independent report has found.

Senior Tory MPs lined up to oppose an extension of hybrid working for the Commons to November, with ex minister Steve Brine declaring: “We are living a lie..we have never worked harder, but we are not working hard here in SW1.”

Growing numbers of Labour MSPs in Holyrood are calling for the party’s leader in Scotland Richard Leonard to step down amid dire polling ratings that put the SNP way ahead in next year’s election. Leonard hit back, suggesting his critics should be deselected as candidates.

What I’m Reading

Here Comes The Real Recession - Axios

Got A Tip? 

Send tips, stories, quotes, pics, plugs or gossip to [email protected] 

Subscribe To Commons People

Each week, the HuffPost UK Politics team unpack the biggest stories from Westminster and beyond. Search for Commons People wherever you listen to podcasts and subscribe.

collect
0
Adrian Bray 2019-10-07

Doogee is now one of the more internationally renowned manufacturers, but still often flying under the radar The announced S95 Pro should maybe change that as a new outdoor smartphone with top specs.

An updated and expanded version of the sensational module-smartphone DOOGEE S95 with huge functionality, not afraid of any environmental challenges, is preparing to once again conquer not just the Russian market of digital gadgets.

This flagship product is a representative of the latest generation of the DOOGEE S.

DOOGEE S95 Pro, like the basic version of the model, which appeared on sale in early 2019, includes four modules, each of which will be an excellent alternative to a full-fledged gadget.

Of the innovations for extreme sports, it is first of all worth noting a waterproof camera that can work even when immersed in water at a 1.5-meter depth for two weeks.

S95 Pro is 99% dust resistant and capable of operating in an ultra-wide temperature range from -0 C to 60 C – from the icy wastelands of the Arctic to the hot sands of the Sahara.

collect
0
Adrian Bray 2021-07-26
img

All levels of industry and government told to get moving, consumers encouraged to buy new Wi-Fi routers

China's Central Cyberspace Affairs Commission and Cyberspace Administration have set out a plan for massive adoption of IPv6.…

Adrian Bray 2021-05-09
img

They were not the cloud we were looking for, says DoD in brief to Supreme Court

In another chapter to a saga that refuses to die, the US government has recommended [PDF] that the Supreme Court rejects Oracle’s efforts to overturn a Department of Defense decision to award the $10bn JEDI contract to Microsoft.…

Adrian Bray 2021-03-31
img
Keen to see monsters punch each other? You've come to the right place.
Adrian Bray 2021-02-19
img
Michael Kellogg is defending the Saudi government and its royals in US courts at a time when the kingdom's reputation has never been worse.
Adrian Bray 2021-01-27
img
US Navy aircraft carriers, and the array of aircraft they bring with them, have become essential to US power projection.
Adrian Bray 2020-10-20
img

I discovered the brilliant secret behind how to create an evergreen webinar – one that will live on forever. And it’s addicting. I’ve become so obsessed with this webinars that some people at work now refer to me as the “Webinar Queen.” If you don’t believe…

The post How to Create an Evergreen Webinar – The Perfect Guide to Automated Webinars appeared first on Growth Marketing Pro.

Adrian Bray 2020-08-17
img
Committing to living in the end times.
Adrian Bray 2019-11-08
img

Beak denies wrongdoing in baffling malware probe case

A judge in the US state of Georgia is facing hacking charges after she allegedly hired private investigators to look into what she believed was a spyware infection on her office computer.

Lawyers for Judge Kathryn Schrader are challenging a September indictment of three counts of computer trespass against herself and three gumshoes she recruited to monitor her work PC.

According to legal publication the Daily Report this week, the charges stem from a February incident in which Schrader allegedly brought in private dick TJ Ward to determine whether or not spyware had been placed on her office computer by Gwinnett County District Attorney Danny Porter.

Ward, in turn, hired computer consultants Ed Kramer and Frank Karic to examine Schrader's machine, it is claimed.

In an effort to root out any potential surveillance-ware on the machine, they installed the open-source packet sniffer Wireshark to inspect Schrader's network connectivity, it is alleged.

Adrian Bray 2021-05-29
img
There are deals on the best streaming stick, our favorite sunglasses, and dozens of other WIRED top picks this holiday weekend.
Adrian Bray 2021-04-04
img
Does the smaller, less-feature-rich OnePlus 8 deserve your cash, or should you stick to the true flagship?
Adrian Bray 2021-03-01
img
Gatorade, the company you best know for its sports drinks, has launched a single-use wearable patch that, when used with its companion app, can analyze an athlete’s sweat and provide them with a ‘unique sweat profile.’ According to Gatorade, the Gx Sweat Patch is the first wearable of its kind to hit the market, one ultimately intended to ‘help inform … Continue reading
Adrian Bray 2021-02-03
Photo by Sean Hollister / The Verge

The Securities and Exchange Commission is looking into whether misinformation posted on social media was used to boost the stocks of GameStop and AMC, according to Bloomberg. The commission is also said to be reviewing trading data as part of its probe into potential market manipulation.

This inquiry comes a week after shares in GameStop and AMC, among other companies, were sent soaring, largely thanks to support from Reddit’s r/WallStreetBets community. The community is ostensibly composed of small-time, amateur traders, but there’s been speculation as to whether some of the members of the community — which describes itself as “like 4chan found a Bloomberg terminal” — may in fact have been professional investors looking to capitalize on...

Continue reading…

Adrian Bray 2021-01-15
img
Ahead of the federal holiday celebrating the birthday of the civil rights leader, here are materials to help educate all ages about the fight for racial justice.
Adrian Bray 2020-09-02
img

You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.

Confidence trick?

“What the people of this country want to see is their representatives back on their seats as fast as possible in the Palace of Westminster,” Boris Johnson declared in PMQs.

The PM was trying to ridicule a Labour MP for appearing via video link, but to the onlooker it felt more like a desperate plea for help: if there were more bums on seats in a “normal” chamber packed with roaring Tory backbenchers, perhaps Keir Starmer wouldn’t look like he was winning every week.

Without the sheer wall of noise an 80-strong majority can give a sitting premier, Johnson has for some months now been stripped of the safety net he could previously use whenever he was exposed on the floor of the House. And with a maximum of 50 MPs allowed at a time, it’s been much easier to hear the Labour leader’s courtroom cross-examination.‌

So far, so predictable. What was different this week however was that Starmer channelled some genuine anger (after the PM accused him of somehow being pro-IRA). Moreover, Speaker Hoyle had decided Johnson could no longer get away with such cheap shots when he was being asked about serious matters like the summer exams fiasco and serial U-turns.

Proving just how better prepared they are these days, Labour then went on the attack, pointing out that it was Johnson himself who had allowed a peerage for Claire Fox, the ex-Brexit Party MEP whose former Revolutionary Communist Party had praised IRA terror just days after the Warrington bomb killed 12-year-old Tim Parry.

The worrying thing for Tory MPs may well be that the PM has himself become predictable, but not in a good way. He simply didn’t look like he had put in the prep needed for this bout with Starmer. His lines about his opponent being a Remainer, being iffy on the IRA and simply being ‘Captain Hindsight’ on Covid all fell flat because they sounded like the evasions they were. And in a socially distanced Commons, they were applause lines without the applause.‌

Those who fear Johnson really is suffering from memory lapses due to ‘long Covid’ would not have been reassured when he claimed that Starmer’s belief that “school is safe” was the first time he had said so in PMQs. He had in fact said so in June 24. If the PM isn’t putting in the work and is forgetting basic facts for PMQs, is he putting in the work and forgetting basic facts in running the country?

The schools jibe felt like Johnson was also trying to fight the last war (he did have some success in making Starmer squirm earlier this summer on the reopenings), not the coming one. But even an attempt to repeat the trick, suggesting Starmer was equivocal over a return to the workplace, didn’t land either.

As it happens, I’ve been passed a memo from Unite the union to its HQ employees, from chief of staff Andrew Murray, which sets out why they should “return to office-based working as from September 1”. “Hundreds of thousands of our members have been working in workplaces throughout, and more are returning every day. It is therefore time, given the government relaxation of restrictions, that the union was back in the office too,” the memo (sent at the end of July) stated.

Sadly for Johnson, he didn’t have that memo as ammo. But even if he had, he had no evidence that Starmer is opposed to people going back to Covid-secure workplaces. Moreover, it’s his own cabinet ministers like Matt Hancock and Grant Shapps who have been saying what matters most is how well workers are performing, rather than where they are located.

Johnson would also dearly have loved to deploy the ‘culture war’ weapon of the Proms saga, but news of the BBC’s own U-turn on singing the lyrics to Rule Britannia came too late. Yet even on this Starmer is far too shrewd to gift him a dividing line, his spokesman telling us that he liked the “pomp and pageantry” of the Proms and the Beeb had finally made the right decision.

It was on furlough however that the PM himself sounded most vulnerable. His flip line that the millions on the scheme were “languishing” “in suspended animation” felt like an echo of the ill-judged claims that furloughed staff are just “sitting” at home. Many of those workers feel like they’re living on redundancy death row, not living it up with pina coladas.

Johnson’s most jarring line though was that “an ounce of confidence is worth a ton of taxpayers’ money”. Breezy confidence from a leader only works if the public are, well, confident in their leader’s competence and the recent U-turns (not least the Bolton/Trafford lockdown) have undermined that far more than anything his critics could say.

In his meeting with 2019 intake MPs, the PM kept saying he wanted to get back as close to normal as possible as soon as possible. That impatience for former certainties was telling. Yet a return to life before Covid looks as likely as a return to life before Starmer. Instead of going back to the future, Johnson is going to have to come up with new ways to deal with his new twin realities.

Quote Of The Day

“I do think this country is going through an orgy of national embarrassment about some of the things that other people around the world love most about us.”

Boris Johnson on someone else’s U-turn for a change: the BBC’s on the Proms

Wednesday Cheat Sheet

Chancellor Rishi Sunak told Tory backbenchers his Budget plan “doesn’t mean a horror show of tax rises with no end in sight”. But many suspect he will impose temporary hikes, just as Labour said a recession is the wrong time to put up taxes. Therese Coffey even said tax cuts could actually increase a tax take.

Roger Taylor, chair of schools regulator Ofqual, told the education select committee that Gavin Williamson had unilaterally decided to scrap exams this summer. It had also briefed No.10 on August 7 of the risks to disadvantaged students of an algorithm model.

The new Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (already dubbed FOCADO) was launched with Dominic Raab warning he would not ditch the 0.7% GDP aid policy. “We are here, day one, we are committed to it, it is in law, it is part of our manifesto.”

The GMB trade union is “institutionally sexist”, a damning independent report has found.

Senior Tory MPs lined up to oppose an extension of hybrid working for the Commons to November, with ex minister Steve Brine declaring: “We are living a lie..we have never worked harder, but we are not working hard here in SW1.”

Growing numbers of Labour MSPs in Holyrood are calling for the party’s leader in Scotland Richard Leonard to step down amid dire polling ratings that put the SNP way ahead in next year’s election. Leonard hit back, suggesting his critics should be deselected as candidates.

What I’m Reading

Here Comes The Real Recession - Axios

Got A Tip? 

Send tips, stories, quotes, pics, plugs or gossip to [email protected] 

Subscribe To Commons People

Each week, the HuffPost UK Politics team unpack the biggest stories from Westminster and beyond. Search for Commons People wherever you listen to podcasts and subscribe.

Adrian Bray 2020-08-01
img

FILE PHOTO: 2018 Vanity Fair Oscar Party – Arrivals – Beverly Hills, California, U.S., 04/03/2018 –  Amazon CEO Jeff and wife MacKenzie Bezos. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok

  • MacKenzie Scott (formerly MacKenzie Bezos) announced Wednesday that she had donated $1.7 billion to 116 different organizations tackling a variety of social issues.
  • By Friday afternoon, the value of her stake in Amazon had grown so much that she is is now richer than she was before the gift, according to CNBC's Robert Frank.
  • Scott, an author by trade, became a billionaire following her 2019 divorce from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. Scott received 25% of Bezos' stake in the e-commerce giant, minus voting control, after helping him found the company in 1997.
  • Scott has a net worth of $60.8 billion, per Bloomberg's latest available estimate.
  • The value of Amazon shares has skyrocketed during the pandemic, helping Bezos' net worth reach new all-time highs, too.
  • The $1.7 billion gift is likely only the start of Scott's philanthropic efforts. She signed the Giving Pledge in 2019.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

SEE ALSO: Jeff Bezos is about to defend his Amazon empire before Congress. Here's how the richest person in the world makes and spends his $178 billion fortune.

DON'T MISS: The founders of Panda Express built a $3 billion fortune off of the Chinese food empire. Here's why the first-generation immigrants say the key to achieving the American dream is giving back.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

Adrian Bray 2019-10-07

Doogee is now one of the more internationally renowned manufacturers, but still often flying under the radar The announced S95 Pro should maybe change that as a new outdoor smartphone with top specs.

An updated and expanded version of the sensational module-smartphone DOOGEE S95 with huge functionality, not afraid of any environmental challenges, is preparing to once again conquer not just the Russian market of digital gadgets.

This flagship product is a representative of the latest generation of the DOOGEE S.

DOOGEE S95 Pro, like the basic version of the model, which appeared on sale in early 2019, includes four modules, each of which will be an excellent alternative to a full-fledged gadget.

Of the innovations for extreme sports, it is first of all worth noting a waterproof camera that can work even when immersed in water at a 1.5-meter depth for two weeks.

S95 Pro is 99% dust resistant and capable of operating in an ultra-wide temperature range from -0 C to 60 C – from the icy wastelands of the Arctic to the hot sands of the Sahara.