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Carlo Prine 2021-07-06
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Summer is arguably the best time to read, and Amazon has picked 12 new books and audiobooks to get you through July.
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Carlo Prine 2021-04-01
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From a machine that digs up tree trunks to a tunnel-washing truck that looks like a car wash on wheels, these machines are all working hard to get the job done.
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0
Carlo Prine 2020-12-18
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The most massive database of microbial gene sequences so far shows that the tree of life is much larger than we knew.
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0
Carlo Prine 2020-08-06
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If you were hoping the release of Google’s new budget-friendly Pixel 4a would be an opportunity to snatch a Pixel 4 or 4XL at a discount, you might be out of luck. Google has discontinued its flagship phones, which it released less than a year ago in October, The Verge reports. The good news is that Pixel 4 and 4XL owners will continue to get software updates for at least a couple of more years. “Google Store has sold through its inventory and completed sales of Pixel 4 [and] 4 XL,” a Google spokesperson told The Verge. “For people who are still…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Google
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Carlo Prine 2021-06-18
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Billie Eilish has admitted she was left frustrated with some of the reaction to her recent British Vogue cover shoot.

Last month, the 19-year-old made headlines the world over when she unveiled a new photo-shoot for the magazine, showing her posing in high-fashion lingerie, in a departure from her usual signature style.

However, Billie has admitted she was put out when some fans suggested the Vogue shoot represented any kind of “growth”.

Speaking to Rolling Stone, she said: “I saw a picture of me on the cover of Vogue [from] a couple of years ago with big, huge oversize clothes [next to the new Vogue cover]. Then the caption was like, ‘That’s called growth’.

“I understand where they’re coming from, but at the same time, I’m like, ‘No, that’s not OK. I’m not this now, and I didn’t need to grow from that’.”

Billie Eilish on the cover of British Vogue

During the Vogue interview accompanying her photo-shoot, Billie – who has spoken out about body-shaming and the importance of choice when it comes to fashion throughout her career – admitted that she anticipated there’d be a backlash to her decision to pose in more revealing clothes than fans were used to seeing her in.

“‘If you’re about body positivity, why would you wear a corset? Why wouldn’t you show your actual body?’” the singer said, parroting potential criticisms of the photoshoot. “My thing is that I can do whatever I want.”

Billie then insisted she’s all about focussing on “what makes you feel good” in this period of her life.

“If you want to get surgery, go get surgery,” she added. “If you want to wear a dress that somebody thinks that you look too big wearing, fuck it – if you feel like you look good, you look good.”

Read Billie Eilish’s full interview in Rolling Stone.

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Carlo Prine 2021-02-01
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German lawmakers recently passed legislation allowing child sexual abuse investigators to deploy artificially-generated images in their efforts to snare online predators. Recent crackdowns in the European nation have resulted in several arrests amid nationwide investigations. This comes on the heels of reports from mid-2020 indicating authorities were “overwhelmed” by the number of reported incidents. In the country’s efforts to fight child sexual abuse, investigators and child advocacy groups have requested the use of Deepfake generators to produce artificial “kinderpornografie.” This, reportedly, would include imagery created using a database containing actual images of child sexual abuse. The reasoning for the investigators’ request,…

This story continues at The Next Web
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Carlo Prine 2020-10-01
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When Americans can fill theaters once again, what if the experience is better than we left it?
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0
Carlo Prine 2020-08-04
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Radish CEO Seungyoon Lee

  • Radish, an app that publishes fiction with a focus on romance novels, announced on Tuesday it raised $63.2 million in Series A funding led by SoftBank Ventures Asia and Kakao Page Corp.
  • The app publishes novels chapter by chapter, giving readers the option to either wait for the next book chapter to unlock or pay to read it immediately.
  • CEO Seungyoon Lee told Business Insider the app is his attempt to introduce mobile serialized fiction, popular in East Asia, to the US market.
  • Radish produces its own content through a series of "writer's rooms," where soap opera writers produce chapters for stories daily.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

If you're in a nautical mood, you can peruse "My Pirate Prince." Or if you want something more earthy, you can try "Tempted By My Brother's Best Friend." 

Those are just a few of the e-books that have racked up millions of reads on Radish, an app that publishes romance fiction in bite-sized chunks. On Tuesday the startup announced it raised $63.2 million in Series A funding led by SoftBank Ventures Asia and Kakao Page Corp.

Radish plans to use the money to open a new office in Los Angeles, where it will hire more staff and expand into the entertainment industry by adapting its original stories into TV shows and games.

Radish features a few serialized genres — like science fiction, horror, thrillers, and fantasy — but its biggest draw is romance.

"Romance is not the only genre that we're going to focus on. But it was a great, great starting genre," Radish CEO Seungyoon Lee told Business Insider. "Because if you look at fiction reader behavior, romance readers almost read one book a month. Whereas mystery or other genre readers read much less."

Radish's stories are readable a single chapter at a time. When someone reaches the end of a chapter, they either have to wait — times range from an hour to a day— to unlock the next chapter, or pay to read it immediately using an in-app currency that can cost up to $3.99 to acquire in bundles.

The cost of reading a whole novel varies, the company says. "Each chapter/episode is a couple coins, and you pay for a bulk of coins! So, it's hard to say because it is dependent on the story,'' Radish spokesperson Grace Gathright said in an email reply to Business Insider.

Lee said the app is styled after mobile gaming, where many apps are free but require payments for additional content.

"The majority of players for Candy Crush is women," Lee said. "The majority of puzzle games, casino games— the players are women. We're using mobile gaming kind of monetization mechanics."

So romance, a genre with a mostly female audience,  seemed like a natural way to introduce fiction apps to the US market.

"I come from South Korea, and we do a lot of mobile, serialized fiction," Lee said. "I felt that here in the US, there wasn't that kind of platform."

According to Radish, the app has become incredibly popular. The company did not disclose expenses, but said its revenue from daily sales has reached $100,000. "Torn Between Alphas," a romantic tale featuring werewolves, is listed in the app as having been viewed over 58 million times.

Lee attributes that growth to the adoption of a "writer's room" model. Initially Radish published stories from contributing authors. But eventually the company hired a staff of almost 100 soap opera writers to produce new stories and update them with new chapters at a rapid pace.

"We're a serialization platform on steroids," Lee said. "Our top story is getting serialized five times a day."

Radish's model for producing new content resembles TV production, sans filming and actors. That's why new book chapters are called "episodes."

"There are people who just focus on the plot," Lee said of his writers, "...there are people focusing on the editing, and there are showrunners who are actually putting all of these things together."

Their writer's room, using the soap opera model, has produced as much as 700 new episodes a month. 

Radish also tests different versions of the same story, switching details like titles and chapter openings to figure out what appeals most to readers.

"Mobile readers have a very short attention span," Lee said. "So the first few paragraphs of the first chapter really has a strong impact."

Lee said Radish had found through testing that first-person stories with female leads tended to beat stories written in third-person or with non-female main characters. But he didn't rule out eventually expanding into content aimed at a male readership, based on the popularity of similar apps in East Asia aimed at men.

"There could be that kind of equivalent for the western audience in fantasy, or scifi, or even mystery-thriller," Lee said. "But it's a matter of content investment."

SEE ALSO: PITCH-DECK LIBRARY: Search through over 150 pitch decks that startups including Uber, Postmates, and Airbnb used to raise millions

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: How waste is dealt with on the world's largest cruise ship

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Carlo Prine 2021-06-04
img
Commentary: "You gotta give them hope." Lessons learned from Milk's fight for LGBTQI equality continue to resonate powerfully.
collect
0
Carlo Prine 2021-01-01
img
In 2021, we'll see nine meteor showers. Boeing and SpaceX should launch humans into orbit, and NASA expects to land the first helicopter on Mars.
collect
0
Carlo Prine 2020-09-26
img
Hodge will join the Rock and Noah Centineo in the new Black Adam movie based on DC Comics characters.
collect
0
Carlo Prine 2019-10-26
img

The U.S. Constitution requires that a population count be conducted at the beginning of every decade.

A complicating factor emerged right at the beginning, with the Constitution’s distinction between “free persons” and “three-fifths of all other persons.” This was the Founding Fathers’ infamous mealy-mouthed compromise between those states with a large number of enslaved persons and those states where relatively few lived.

The first census, in 1790, also made non-constitutionally mandated distinctions by age and sex.

He expressed his concerns to a young mechanical engineer assisting with the census, Herman Hollerith, a recent graduate of the Columbia School of Mines.

The technological solutions devised by Hollerith involved a suite of mechanical and electrical devices.

For example, if a card for a white male farmer passed through the machine, a counter for each of these categories would be increased by one.

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0
Carlo Prine 2021-05-15
img
Actor Blondy Baruti, who played a Marvel villain, said he invested everything he made in the past four years in his social media firm, BePerk
collect
0
Carlo Prine 2020-12-30
img
Financially speaking, nobody had a better year than Elon Musk. Here's how the billionaire's coffers fared in 2020, and why.
collect
0
Carlo Prine 2020-09-17
img
Here are all of the allegations of sexual misconduct made against President Donald Trump, nearly all of which he has denied.
collect
0
Carlo Prine 2019-10-19
img

A show as long-running and as thematically varied as American Horror Story isn’t going to please every fan every season (the “timely” Cult was a low point, but last year’s crossover, Apocalypse, was fabulous).

From its very first promos, I had a good feeling about AHS: 1984 – and so far the slasher homage has not let me down.

Ryan Murphy’s earlier ode to all things slasher, Fox’s Scream Queens – which also featured 1984 stars Emma Roberts and Billie Lourd – was pretty mediocre (though casting Jamie Lee Curtis was genius).

To sum up, as briefly as possible: the sole survivor of the 1970 Camp Redwood tragedy – former counsellor turned Jesus freak/ultraconservative rich widow/knee-sock enthusiast Margaret Booth (Leslie Grossman) – has bought the camp and is intent on transforming it back into a wholesome retreat for children.

The rest of the group includes Xavier (Cody Fern), whose dreams of becoming a movie star are threatened by the gay porn director who’s blackmailing him to stay in the X-rated biz; Chet, a would-be Olympian who was disqualified for doping (played by Gus Kenworthy, a real-life Olympic medalist); and college dropout Ray (DeRon Horton), who’s terrified the LAPD is about to discover his part in the accidental death of a fraternity pledge.

And then there’s Montana (Billie Lourd), a horny cardio fiend who seduces the Night Stalker so he’ll go after Brooke, whose former fiancé (deep breath, soap opera incoming) shot and killed Montana’s brother in a jealous rage, thinking his soon-to-be wife and best friend were having an affair – which Brooke (who doesn’t realise who Montana really is) denies but Montana believes to be true.

collect
0
Carlo Prine 2021-07-06
img
Summer is arguably the best time to read, and Amazon has picked 12 new books and audiobooks to get you through July.
Carlo Prine 2021-06-04
img
Commentary: "You gotta give them hope." Lessons learned from Milk's fight for LGBTQI equality continue to resonate powerfully.
Carlo Prine 2021-04-01
img
From a machine that digs up tree trunks to a tunnel-washing truck that looks like a car wash on wheels, these machines are all working hard to get the job done.
Carlo Prine 2021-01-01
img
In 2021, we'll see nine meteor showers. Boeing and SpaceX should launch humans into orbit, and NASA expects to land the first helicopter on Mars.
Carlo Prine 2020-12-18
img
The most massive database of microbial gene sequences so far shows that the tree of life is much larger than we knew.
Carlo Prine 2020-09-26
img
Hodge will join the Rock and Noah Centineo in the new Black Adam movie based on DC Comics characters.
Carlo Prine 2020-08-06
img

If you were hoping the release of Google’s new budget-friendly Pixel 4a would be an opportunity to snatch a Pixel 4 or 4XL at a discount, you might be out of luck. Google has discontinued its flagship phones, which it released less than a year ago in October, The Verge reports. The good news is that Pixel 4 and 4XL owners will continue to get software updates for at least a couple of more years. “Google Store has sold through its inventory and completed sales of Pixel 4 [and] 4 XL,” a Google spokesperson told The Verge. “For people who are still…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Google
Carlo Prine 2019-10-26
img

The U.S. Constitution requires that a population count be conducted at the beginning of every decade.

A complicating factor emerged right at the beginning, with the Constitution’s distinction between “free persons” and “three-fifths of all other persons.” This was the Founding Fathers’ infamous mealy-mouthed compromise between those states with a large number of enslaved persons and those states where relatively few lived.

The first census, in 1790, also made non-constitutionally mandated distinctions by age and sex.

He expressed his concerns to a young mechanical engineer assisting with the census, Herman Hollerith, a recent graduate of the Columbia School of Mines.

The technological solutions devised by Hollerith involved a suite of mechanical and electrical devices.

For example, if a card for a white male farmer passed through the machine, a counter for each of these categories would be increased by one.

Carlo Prine 2021-06-18
img

Billie Eilish has admitted she was left frustrated with some of the reaction to her recent British Vogue cover shoot.

Last month, the 19-year-old made headlines the world over when she unveiled a new photo-shoot for the magazine, showing her posing in high-fashion lingerie, in a departure from her usual signature style.

However, Billie has admitted she was put out when some fans suggested the Vogue shoot represented any kind of “growth”.

Speaking to Rolling Stone, she said: “I saw a picture of me on the cover of Vogue [from] a couple of years ago with big, huge oversize clothes [next to the new Vogue cover]. Then the caption was like, ‘That’s called growth’.

“I understand where they’re coming from, but at the same time, I’m like, ‘No, that’s not OK. I’m not this now, and I didn’t need to grow from that’.”

Billie Eilish on the cover of British Vogue

During the Vogue interview accompanying her photo-shoot, Billie – who has spoken out about body-shaming and the importance of choice when it comes to fashion throughout her career – admitted that she anticipated there’d be a backlash to her decision to pose in more revealing clothes than fans were used to seeing her in.

“‘If you’re about body positivity, why would you wear a corset? Why wouldn’t you show your actual body?’” the singer said, parroting potential criticisms of the photoshoot. “My thing is that I can do whatever I want.”

Billie then insisted she’s all about focussing on “what makes you feel good” in this period of her life.

“If you want to get surgery, go get surgery,” she added. “If you want to wear a dress that somebody thinks that you look too big wearing, fuck it – if you feel like you look good, you look good.”

Read Billie Eilish’s full interview in Rolling Stone.

Carlo Prine 2021-05-15
img
Actor Blondy Baruti, who played a Marvel villain, said he invested everything he made in the past four years in his social media firm, BePerk
Carlo Prine 2021-02-01
img

German lawmakers recently passed legislation allowing child sexual abuse investigators to deploy artificially-generated images in their efforts to snare online predators. Recent crackdowns in the European nation have resulted in several arrests amid nationwide investigations. This comes on the heels of reports from mid-2020 indicating authorities were “overwhelmed” by the number of reported incidents. In the country’s efforts to fight child sexual abuse, investigators and child advocacy groups have requested the use of Deepfake generators to produce artificial “kinderpornografie.” This, reportedly, would include imagery created using a database containing actual images of child sexual abuse. The reasoning for the investigators’ request,…

This story continues at The Next Web
Carlo Prine 2020-12-30
img
Financially speaking, nobody had a better year than Elon Musk. Here's how the billionaire's coffers fared in 2020, and why.
Carlo Prine 2020-10-01
img
When Americans can fill theaters once again, what if the experience is better than we left it?
Carlo Prine 2020-09-17
img
Here are all of the allegations of sexual misconduct made against President Donald Trump, nearly all of which he has denied.
Carlo Prine 2020-08-04
img

Radish CEO Seungyoon Lee

  • Radish, an app that publishes fiction with a focus on romance novels, announced on Tuesday it raised $63.2 million in Series A funding led by SoftBank Ventures Asia and Kakao Page Corp.
  • The app publishes novels chapter by chapter, giving readers the option to either wait for the next book chapter to unlock or pay to read it immediately.
  • CEO Seungyoon Lee told Business Insider the app is his attempt to introduce mobile serialized fiction, popular in East Asia, to the US market.
  • Radish produces its own content through a series of "writer's rooms," where soap opera writers produce chapters for stories daily.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

If you're in a nautical mood, you can peruse "My Pirate Prince." Or if you want something more earthy, you can try "Tempted By My Brother's Best Friend." 

Those are just a few of the e-books that have racked up millions of reads on Radish, an app that publishes romance fiction in bite-sized chunks. On Tuesday the startup announced it raised $63.2 million in Series A funding led by SoftBank Ventures Asia and Kakao Page Corp.

Radish plans to use the money to open a new office in Los Angeles, where it will hire more staff and expand into the entertainment industry by adapting its original stories into TV shows and games.

Radish features a few serialized genres — like science fiction, horror, thrillers, and fantasy — but its biggest draw is romance.

"Romance is not the only genre that we're going to focus on. But it was a great, great starting genre," Radish CEO Seungyoon Lee told Business Insider. "Because if you look at fiction reader behavior, romance readers almost read one book a month. Whereas mystery or other genre readers read much less."

Radish's stories are readable a single chapter at a time. When someone reaches the end of a chapter, they either have to wait — times range from an hour to a day— to unlock the next chapter, or pay to read it immediately using an in-app currency that can cost up to $3.99 to acquire in bundles.

The cost of reading a whole novel varies, the company says. "Each chapter/episode is a couple coins, and you pay for a bulk of coins! So, it's hard to say because it is dependent on the story,'' Radish spokesperson Grace Gathright said in an email reply to Business Insider.

Lee said the app is styled after mobile gaming, where many apps are free but require payments for additional content.

"The majority of players for Candy Crush is women," Lee said. "The majority of puzzle games, casino games— the players are women. We're using mobile gaming kind of monetization mechanics."

So romance, a genre with a mostly female audience,  seemed like a natural way to introduce fiction apps to the US market.

"I come from South Korea, and we do a lot of mobile, serialized fiction," Lee said. "I felt that here in the US, there wasn't that kind of platform."

According to Radish, the app has become incredibly popular. The company did not disclose expenses, but said its revenue from daily sales has reached $100,000. "Torn Between Alphas," a romantic tale featuring werewolves, is listed in the app as having been viewed over 58 million times.

Lee attributes that growth to the adoption of a "writer's room" model. Initially Radish published stories from contributing authors. But eventually the company hired a staff of almost 100 soap opera writers to produce new stories and update them with new chapters at a rapid pace.

"We're a serialization platform on steroids," Lee said. "Our top story is getting serialized five times a day."

Radish's model for producing new content resembles TV production, sans filming and actors. That's why new book chapters are called "episodes."

"There are people who just focus on the plot," Lee said of his writers, "...there are people focusing on the editing, and there are showrunners who are actually putting all of these things together."

Their writer's room, using the soap opera model, has produced as much as 700 new episodes a month. 

Radish also tests different versions of the same story, switching details like titles and chapter openings to figure out what appeals most to readers.

"Mobile readers have a very short attention span," Lee said. "So the first few paragraphs of the first chapter really has a strong impact."

Lee said Radish had found through testing that first-person stories with female leads tended to beat stories written in third-person or with non-female main characters. But he didn't rule out eventually expanding into content aimed at a male readership, based on the popularity of similar apps in East Asia aimed at men.

"There could be that kind of equivalent for the western audience in fantasy, or scifi, or even mystery-thriller," Lee said. "But it's a matter of content investment."

SEE ALSO: PITCH-DECK LIBRARY: Search through over 150 pitch decks that startups including Uber, Postmates, and Airbnb used to raise millions

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: How waste is dealt with on the world's largest cruise ship

Carlo Prine 2019-10-19
img

A show as long-running and as thematically varied as American Horror Story isn’t going to please every fan every season (the “timely” Cult was a low point, but last year’s crossover, Apocalypse, was fabulous).

From its very first promos, I had a good feeling about AHS: 1984 – and so far the slasher homage has not let me down.

Ryan Murphy’s earlier ode to all things slasher, Fox’s Scream Queens – which also featured 1984 stars Emma Roberts and Billie Lourd – was pretty mediocre (though casting Jamie Lee Curtis was genius).

To sum up, as briefly as possible: the sole survivor of the 1970 Camp Redwood tragedy – former counsellor turned Jesus freak/ultraconservative rich widow/knee-sock enthusiast Margaret Booth (Leslie Grossman) – has bought the camp and is intent on transforming it back into a wholesome retreat for children.

The rest of the group includes Xavier (Cody Fern), whose dreams of becoming a movie star are threatened by the gay porn director who’s blackmailing him to stay in the X-rated biz; Chet, a would-be Olympian who was disqualified for doping (played by Gus Kenworthy, a real-life Olympic medalist); and college dropout Ray (DeRon Horton), who’s terrified the LAPD is about to discover his part in the accidental death of a fraternity pledge.

And then there’s Montana (Billie Lourd), a horny cardio fiend who seduces the Night Stalker so he’ll go after Brooke, whose former fiancé (deep breath, soap opera incoming) shot and killed Montana’s brother in a jealous rage, thinking his soon-to-be wife and best friend were having an affair – which Brooke (who doesn’t realise who Montana really is) denies but Montana believes to be true.