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David Erb 2021-07-16
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More people are making their resignations public on TikTok to inspire others to quit, too — and some of the videos are seriously daring.

Traditionally, the only people who know how you quit your job are you, your boss and maybe a representative from human resources. If you go by the book, your resignation notice ― along with what you say and do on your way out ― typically stays within the company.

But as record-high numbers of workers quit during the pandemic, people increasingly went public with their exits, posting their resignation notices on restaurant signs or posting the moment they quit on TikTok for all to see and share. 

Shana Blackwell, a Walmart night stocker who quit in October 2020 after more than a year on the job, used her store’s intercom system to broadcast her exit to everyone in the building. 

@shanablackwell

And here is the video of me quitting my toxic, sexist, racist workplace. #walmartchallenge#fyp#viral#walmart#walmarthaul#walmartfindspart1

♬ original sound - Shana

Blackwell, then 19, had reached a breaking point with her draining, physically demanding job at a store in Lubbock, Texas. She had taken complaints to Walmart, she said, but nothing came of it. She was initially prepared to quit calmly to a manager, but none were unavailable to have a conversation. A truck shipment had come late, and managers were yelling at the team “as if it was our fault,” she said. 

“I was angered. That day, it gave me PTSD of the whole year and a half I had spent there. So not only was that day making me mad and frustrated and all these emotions, I was reminiscing on the past and how that manager was yelling at me now, and two months ago he was yelling at me, the day that I got hired he was yelling at me, and it’s been hell ever since I got here,” Blackwell told HuffPost. “I guess that’s what led me to going to one of those phones and dialing the number to make my voice heard all over the store.” 

“Attention all Walmart shoppers, associates, and managers,” she announced before proceeding to call out co-workers by name for being “racist,” “stinky,” and “lazy.” She referred to employees in one section of the store as “perverts” she hopes don’t “talk to your daughters the way you talk to me.”

She thanked another colleague for getting her the job when she needed it, and ended with a resounding “Fuck the managers, fuck this company, fuck this position... I fucking quit.”

@dogs6666660

Original video with original sound as requested

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David Erb 2021-05-10
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Apple’s next big black eye to Qualcomm may come sooner than many expected, with the iPhone tipped to switch to a homegrown 5G modem design in 2023 according to a new analyst report. Although Apple designs a significant number of iPhone components itself, including the primary A-series chipset, it still relies on third-party modems for the smartphones. That’s been the … Continue reading
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David Erb 2021-03-18
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The Scion Asset Management boss has tweeted about market bubbles and criticized Tesla, bitcoin, Robinhood, and the GameStop buying frenzy this year.
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David Erb 2020-09-28
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Accounts have reportedly been created for more than two dozen universities and colleges.
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David Erb 2021-06-25
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Millions of women around the world use an IUD, also known as a copper coil, as contraception. If fitted properly, it can be more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. 

But for some women, there’s a big catch: the pain. On social media, women have been sharing their experiences of insertion and removal, calling for greater awareness and better pain relief options. 

It all started when Cardiff-based entrepreneur Lucy Cohen launched a petition calling for more pain relief options for women have the coil inserted. Her petition was shared by feminist campaigner and author Caroline Criado Perez, which then sparked a column by journalist Caitlin Moran, who shared her own painful experience and called for all women to be offered a local anaesthetic with treatment. 

Before long, other women were publicly sharing their experiences, including BBC Breakfast presenter Naga Munchetty, who said her IUD insertion was so painful, she fainted twice and her husband could hear her screaming from the waiting room. He was so shocked, he tried to find out which room she was in so he could intervene. 

It’s important to point out though, that many women have IUDs fitted with no problems at all and for these women, it can offer a great hormone-free alternative to contraceptives such as the pill. 

So why do some experience such intense pain with the coil while others don’t? 

Put simply, our bodies and medical histories are different, says Dr Shree Datta, consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist at The Lister Hospital. 

“This depends on the individual person, the shape and size of their womb, whether they have taken pain relief or had a coil inserted previously and whether they have had children,” she tells HuffPost UK.

“It can also depend on how easy the procedure to insert the coil is and how long the procedure takes. Some women tolerate medical procedures to the womb better than others. Often (but not always!) women who have had normal deliveries of their babies find the pain much less severe – but this is compared to childbirth, of course.” 

What level of pain is considered ‘normal’?

It’s common to feel some mild to moderate cramping during and after the procedure, similar to period pains, so you may like to take some pain relief beforehand. 

“The pain is usually felt when the practitioner is inserting the IUD past the cervix and into the womb and most people find the pain tolerable as it is short lived due to the short length of the procedure,” says Dr Datta. 

“If the pain you are experiencing is making you feel light headed, faint, nauseous or tearful during the procedure, let the doctor fitting the IUD know immediately.”

It’s also normal for some cramping to continue after your fitting for some time and you might experience some spotting or light bleeding, she adds. However, many people feel no pain at all.

“Following your fitting, if you experience continued pain or heavy bleeding, contact the doctor who inserted the IUD,” she says. “If you experience a fever in the days after the procedure, or a change in the nature or smell of your vaginal discharge, this could be a sign of an infection and you may need antibiotics.”

And if you’ve already had a coil fitted...

Try not to panic. It’s understandable if recent social media discussion has made you worried about having your IUD removed, but the removal procedure “should be less painful and quicker than having the IUD fitted,” according to the sexual health charity Brook. If you no longer want to keep your coil, it can be taken out at any time by a specially trained doctor or nurse. 

A small percentage of women do experience problems with the coil and may need it removed sooner. 

“During the first few months after having your IUD fitted, there is a small chance your device could move or that your body could reject the device and expel it, so it’s a good idea to learn how to self-examine for the threads that hang down from the coil,” says Dr Datta. 

“These are usually felt in the vagina and your doctor will show you how to check for these at the time of coil insertion. You should check these strings regularly to ensure your coil is in the correct place. If you are unable to feel the IUD strings, this could mean that the IUD isn’t in the correct place or has been expelled, so you could fall pregnant.”

If your partner can feel the IUD during sex, you have continued severe pain that doesn’t go away after having the IUD fitted or you have persistently heavy or abnormal bleeding, it’s also worth consulting your doctor.

“Keep a record of the bleeding in a diary or app, so you get an idea of how the coil is affecting your periods,” says Dr Datta. “If you experience any unusual discharge after your fitting, or you have a fever, this could be signs of an infection and you should contact your doctor straight away. ”

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David Erb 2021-05-04
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A Kindle Unlimited subscription grants you access to over 1 million e-books, audiobooks, and magazines. We look at how it works, and whether it's worth it.
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David Erb 2021-03-08
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Weaver signed on to be part of TLP Media months after going on leave from the Lincoln Project, The New York Times reported.
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David Erb 2020-08-15
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There are loads of things you can use your old smartphone for once you've upgraded to a new one.
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David Erb 2021-06-04
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Throughout June, HuffPost UK is speaking to different LGBTQ public figures and allies about all things Pride for our new Over The Rainbow series.

And who better to kick things off than drag legend, singer and activist Peppermint.

Peppermint was an immediate fan favourite when she debuted on RuPaul’s Drag Race in 2017, and became responsible for some of the series’ most memorable moments (not least her club kids-inspired runway and iconic lip sync to Madonna’s Music).

But there’s a lot more to Peppermint than just Drag Race.

After making it to the top two, she became the first transgender woman to originate a role on Broadway in the musical Head Over Heels and co-founded the Black Queer Town Hall platform with fellow Drag Race legend Bob The Drag Queen.

This Pride month, she spoke to us about her favourite memories of New York City Pride and her queer icons, past and present...

What is your favourite Pride memory?

It’s a toss-up between two. My first New York City Pride, I was in the parade with many of my other co-workers from the infamous Tunnel nightclub where I worked in New York City. Myself and the gals used our $50-a-week pay to get matching spandex from the garment district and we had our resident costume-maker Miss Feathers create matching looks for all the girls.

We were the resident drag entertainers, and so we were like, “we are royalty, honey, our club got a float”, we were so excited to go and ride on the float. And honey, when we got there, they were like, “no, the float is reserved for the go-go boys. You ladies have to walk”. And we were all in heels. The patriarchy rears its ugly head again! That was probably 1998 or 1999.

A few years later, I had been the cover girl on the local gay magazine, and so they offered for me to ride on their float – and I made sure that it was actually on the float. The theme was slumber party, so there was a bed, the go-go boys were in pyjamas, I was in my negligee. But then I get on the float, and the bed is just a wooden box with a sheet draped over it, and I’m like, “y’all, you could at least have put a duvet on here”. It was like riding on a tractor, it was so uncomfortable, but we made it look like it wasn’t.

And then it started pouring rain, and all of the makeup was washing down me, I looked over and the go-go boys’ bronzer was melting off. It was like gay Carrie. There was a sea of bronzer and makeup going down the white sheets, down the white float, it was glorious. 

Peppermint at RuPaul's DragCon in 2018

Who is your LGBTQ hero?

I personally like to celebrate the achievements of the sort of “everyday hero”. Given the recent landscape in the United States with all of the policies and proposed legislation that targets transgender people, I would like to highlight Chase Strangio, who is, I believe, one of the leading attorneys who is fighting very diligently to represent our community, fighting against discrimination and all of these discriminatory bills and policies with the ACLU in the United States.

He is a great resource for how to sort of combat these things – even internationally, because what we know is that conservatives often use the same playbook - even if it’s from another country - for discrimination.

Chase Strangio

What is your go-to Pride anthem? 

It has to be something from when I was in the nightclubs. That’s probably one of the times that I’ve felt the most liberated, and it’s no coincidence that this song was playing on the Pride float when I was riding it, it’s Free by Ultra Naté.

It’s not necessarily a “gay anthem” or an “LGBTQ anthem”, it’s not about queer issues specifically. But it’s just about being liberated, and that’s obviously an important part of the conversation. 

 

I do want to highlight Shea Diamond, too. I wouldn’t necessarily say this is a “Pride anthem”, but I really like her song I Am Her. It resonates with me so much. She is a Black trans woman, she’s a visionary and someone that I think we should all look up and follow. She’s got some wonderful songs. 

What is your favourite LGBTQ film?

I love the movie Tangerine, that is a brilliant film. It’s one of the more essential films when it comes to sort of addressing, talking about or even dismantling the patriarchy, which is a key – in my opinion - to a lot of the suffering that we all face, both on an interpersonal level and in world wars.

And I think the movie Moonlight is beautiful. It sort of shows what happens when repressed or oppressed queer Black men, or queer men [in general], are able to shed their armour that they’ve built up over their lifetime and become vulnerable and open.

The next one will be A Girl Like Me, which is the short film that I have produced, which connects to my album, and it’s all about the life of a Black trans woman dealing with love and relationships. And that will be out later this year. But since it’s not out yet… I won’t mention it! 

Jharrel Jerome and Ashton Sanders in Moonlight

What was an LGBTQ TV show or TV moment that made you feel represented?

As a younger person, there was just so little to choose from, right? I remember being so excited, because I used to watch Melrose Place, and I’ll never forget, they had this episode that was like, “oh my gosh, there’s going to be a gay kiss”. And they [laughs] got everyone to tune in, and it was literally a cut of one guy walking to another, and then the other guy walking to him, and then they cut to, like, a picture on the wall. And we didn’t see them actually kiss! It was this implied kiss!

That was in 1996 – as recent as that – and they were still not willing to actually show queer relationships in a realistic and healthy way. And it was still so controversial! People were boycotting, people were picketing, they wanted the show to be cancelled… everybody was up in arms over two people walking. You know? What’s going on? But that was still a seminal moment.

And then obviously just a year later, Ellen DeGeneres came out on her show, and had her major TV moment, and that was a milestone.

I do want to say that the queerest moment [in recent times], that was so unabashedly and unapologetically Black and gaaaaay as ever, was Lil Nas X’s performance on Saturday Night Live. I can’t… going from Melrose Place to that? Going from them not even showing two gay people actually touching each other to Lil Nas X’s performance that was just a bunch of gay folks shaking their booty, and living their sexuality, the same exact way that a cis-hetereo guy would be having girls dancing around him and shaking their booties in thongs, it’s the same thing, and I love it.

Lil Nas X performing on Saturday Night Live

Who would be your ultimate queer icon?

I’m really inspired by people who are continuing to live their life loud and proud and also are able to serve as examples, and really give back to the community and use their platform in a productive way. And so people like Laverne Cox, 100% are some of my icons, my heroes, people that I think are just brilliant members of our community.

In terms of a queer icon, personally, one of the queerest icons that had a large influence on me, from my childhood, was someone who did not identify as queer, but certainly was an influence in the queer world and had a certain queerness about him – and this will be controversial – is Prince.

Prince performing live in 1985

I like to throw that one in every now and then, because Prince is someone who is not self-described as LGBTQ, but certainly advocated for sexual freedom and was a Black man wearing heels and long hair and all the makeup… Granted, it was the 80s and 90s, but Prince was really one of those people who just exuded sexual freedom and sexuality and a lack of shame or stigma in his music and his videos and in his performances. Very much serving a pre-Lil Nas X performance in the 90s. 

What is your message for young LGBTQ people this Pride month?

Let’s call up our loved ones, our friends, our family members, people that we work with, and in a loving way, not an aggressive way – but definitely in a firm and direct way – hold those people accountable for participating in the betterment of our lives.

[Let’s ask] them to have the uncomfortable conversations with the people around them, when a queer person or LGBTQ person isn’t even around. To have those conversations with their friends, their family, their co-workers, people in their lives, about queer people, about how much they love queer people, and how wonderful they think gay folks and trans folks are, and how they would like to see more of them being celebrated.

Invite them over for dinner – whatever! Let’s get them all talking and uplifting us, to show that the time for gay or queer Pride is not just when some gay person comes sauntering through, and when we’re not around is when a lot of times those harmful decisions and thoughts are being generated, I believe. And so, why not nip it in the bud?

Let’s get your big brother, who doesn’t even have a gay or trans friend, let’s get him understanding, let’s get him sitting down and watching some of these queer films we talked about, let’s get him reading some of the queer material that’s out there or talking about what’s going on against transgender people in their towns and neighbourhoods. Let’s get them involved.

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David Erb 2021-03-26
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Ow. Thank you sir may I have another

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David Erb 2021-02-10
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Michigan state Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey was recorded spreading conspiracies about the Capitol riot.
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David Erb 2020-08-12
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Amazon has stacked up loads of great shows to watch. Here are some of the best.
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David Erb 2021-05-26
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"Among Us" is an online strategy game that can be played on a PC, smartphone, or Nintendo Switch. It's been made famous by gamers on Twitch.
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David Erb 2021-03-24
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If you like camping, you may want to consider a truck bed tent that you can attach to the back of your truck. Here are our favorites.
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David Erb 2021-01-03
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All of our favourite games on the Nintendo Switch
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David Erb 2020-08-11
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Facial recognition tests in public spaces violated privacy, didn't follow data protection procedures and didn't address possible bias, judges say.
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David Erb 2021-07-16
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More people are making their resignations public on TikTok to inspire others to quit, too — and some of the videos are seriously daring.

Traditionally, the only people who know how you quit your job are you, your boss and maybe a representative from human resources. If you go by the book, your resignation notice ― along with what you say and do on your way out ― typically stays within the company.

But as record-high numbers of workers quit during the pandemic, people increasingly went public with their exits, posting their resignation notices on restaurant signs or posting the moment they quit on TikTok for all to see and share. 

Shana Blackwell, a Walmart night stocker who quit in October 2020 after more than a year on the job, used her store’s intercom system to broadcast her exit to everyone in the building. 

@shanablackwell

And here is the video of me quitting my toxic, sexist, racist workplace. #walmartchallenge#fyp#viral#walmart#walmarthaul#walmartfindspart1

♬ original sound - Shana

Blackwell, then 19, had reached a breaking point with her draining, physically demanding job at a store in Lubbock, Texas. She had taken complaints to Walmart, she said, but nothing came of it. She was initially prepared to quit calmly to a manager, but none were unavailable to have a conversation. A truck shipment had come late, and managers were yelling at the team “as if it was our fault,” she said. 

“I was angered. That day, it gave me PTSD of the whole year and a half I had spent there. So not only was that day making me mad and frustrated and all these emotions, I was reminiscing on the past and how that manager was yelling at me now, and two months ago he was yelling at me, the day that I got hired he was yelling at me, and it’s been hell ever since I got here,” Blackwell told HuffPost. “I guess that’s what led me to going to one of those phones and dialing the number to make my voice heard all over the store.” 

“Attention all Walmart shoppers, associates, and managers,” she announced before proceeding to call out co-workers by name for being “racist,” “stinky,” and “lazy.” She referred to employees in one section of the store as “perverts” she hopes don’t “talk to your daughters the way you talk to me.”

She thanked another colleague for getting her the job when she needed it, and ended with a resounding “Fuck the managers, fuck this company, fuck this position... I fucking quit.”

@dogs6666660

Original video with original sound as requested

David Erb 2021-06-04
img

Throughout June, HuffPost UK is speaking to different LGBTQ public figures and allies about all things Pride for our new Over The Rainbow series.

And who better to kick things off than drag legend, singer and activist Peppermint.

Peppermint was an immediate fan favourite when she debuted on RuPaul’s Drag Race in 2017, and became responsible for some of the series’ most memorable moments (not least her club kids-inspired runway and iconic lip sync to Madonna’s Music).

But there’s a lot more to Peppermint than just Drag Race.

After making it to the top two, she became the first transgender woman to originate a role on Broadway in the musical Head Over Heels and co-founded the Black Queer Town Hall platform with fellow Drag Race legend Bob The Drag Queen.

This Pride month, she spoke to us about her favourite memories of New York City Pride and her queer icons, past and present...

What is your favourite Pride memory?

It’s a toss-up between two. My first New York City Pride, I was in the parade with many of my other co-workers from the infamous Tunnel nightclub where I worked in New York City. Myself and the gals used our $50-a-week pay to get matching spandex from the garment district and we had our resident costume-maker Miss Feathers create matching looks for all the girls.

We were the resident drag entertainers, and so we were like, “we are royalty, honey, our club got a float”, we were so excited to go and ride on the float. And honey, when we got there, they were like, “no, the float is reserved for the go-go boys. You ladies have to walk”. And we were all in heels. The patriarchy rears its ugly head again! That was probably 1998 or 1999.

A few years later, I had been the cover girl on the local gay magazine, and so they offered for me to ride on their float – and I made sure that it was actually on the float. The theme was slumber party, so there was a bed, the go-go boys were in pyjamas, I was in my negligee. But then I get on the float, and the bed is just a wooden box with a sheet draped over it, and I’m like, “y’all, you could at least have put a duvet on here”. It was like riding on a tractor, it was so uncomfortable, but we made it look like it wasn’t.

And then it started pouring rain, and all of the makeup was washing down me, I looked over and the go-go boys’ bronzer was melting off. It was like gay Carrie. There was a sea of bronzer and makeup going down the white sheets, down the white float, it was glorious. 

Peppermint at RuPaul's DragCon in 2018

Who is your LGBTQ hero?

I personally like to celebrate the achievements of the sort of “everyday hero”. Given the recent landscape in the United States with all of the policies and proposed legislation that targets transgender people, I would like to highlight Chase Strangio, who is, I believe, one of the leading attorneys who is fighting very diligently to represent our community, fighting against discrimination and all of these discriminatory bills and policies with the ACLU in the United States.

He is a great resource for how to sort of combat these things – even internationally, because what we know is that conservatives often use the same playbook - even if it’s from another country - for discrimination.

Chase Strangio

What is your go-to Pride anthem? 

It has to be something from when I was in the nightclubs. That’s probably one of the times that I’ve felt the most liberated, and it’s no coincidence that this song was playing on the Pride float when I was riding it, it’s Free by Ultra Naté.

It’s not necessarily a “gay anthem” or an “LGBTQ anthem”, it’s not about queer issues specifically. But it’s just about being liberated, and that’s obviously an important part of the conversation. 

 

I do want to highlight Shea Diamond, too. I wouldn’t necessarily say this is a “Pride anthem”, but I really like her song I Am Her. It resonates with me so much. She is a Black trans woman, she’s a visionary and someone that I think we should all look up and follow. She’s got some wonderful songs. 

What is your favourite LGBTQ film?

I love the movie Tangerine, that is a brilliant film. It’s one of the more essential films when it comes to sort of addressing, talking about or even dismantling the patriarchy, which is a key – in my opinion - to a lot of the suffering that we all face, both on an interpersonal level and in world wars.

And I think the movie Moonlight is beautiful. It sort of shows what happens when repressed or oppressed queer Black men, or queer men [in general], are able to shed their armour that they’ve built up over their lifetime and become vulnerable and open.

The next one will be A Girl Like Me, which is the short film that I have produced, which connects to my album, and it’s all about the life of a Black trans woman dealing with love and relationships. And that will be out later this year. But since it’s not out yet… I won’t mention it! 

Jharrel Jerome and Ashton Sanders in Moonlight

What was an LGBTQ TV show or TV moment that made you feel represented?

As a younger person, there was just so little to choose from, right? I remember being so excited, because I used to watch Melrose Place, and I’ll never forget, they had this episode that was like, “oh my gosh, there’s going to be a gay kiss”. And they [laughs] got everyone to tune in, and it was literally a cut of one guy walking to another, and then the other guy walking to him, and then they cut to, like, a picture on the wall. And we didn’t see them actually kiss! It was this implied kiss!

That was in 1996 – as recent as that – and they were still not willing to actually show queer relationships in a realistic and healthy way. And it was still so controversial! People were boycotting, people were picketing, they wanted the show to be cancelled… everybody was up in arms over two people walking. You know? What’s going on? But that was still a seminal moment.

And then obviously just a year later, Ellen DeGeneres came out on her show, and had her major TV moment, and that was a milestone.

I do want to say that the queerest moment [in recent times], that was so unabashedly and unapologetically Black and gaaaaay as ever, was Lil Nas X’s performance on Saturday Night Live. I can’t… going from Melrose Place to that? Going from them not even showing two gay people actually touching each other to Lil Nas X’s performance that was just a bunch of gay folks shaking their booty, and living their sexuality, the same exact way that a cis-hetereo guy would be having girls dancing around him and shaking their booties in thongs, it’s the same thing, and I love it.

Lil Nas X performing on Saturday Night Live

Who would be your ultimate queer icon?

I’m really inspired by people who are continuing to live their life loud and proud and also are able to serve as examples, and really give back to the community and use their platform in a productive way. And so people like Laverne Cox, 100% are some of my icons, my heroes, people that I think are just brilliant members of our community.

In terms of a queer icon, personally, one of the queerest icons that had a large influence on me, from my childhood, was someone who did not identify as queer, but certainly was an influence in the queer world and had a certain queerness about him – and this will be controversial – is Prince.

Prince performing live in 1985

I like to throw that one in every now and then, because Prince is someone who is not self-described as LGBTQ, but certainly advocated for sexual freedom and was a Black man wearing heels and long hair and all the makeup… Granted, it was the 80s and 90s, but Prince was really one of those people who just exuded sexual freedom and sexuality and a lack of shame or stigma in his music and his videos and in his performances. Very much serving a pre-Lil Nas X performance in the 90s. 

What is your message for young LGBTQ people this Pride month?

Let’s call up our loved ones, our friends, our family members, people that we work with, and in a loving way, not an aggressive way – but definitely in a firm and direct way – hold those people accountable for participating in the betterment of our lives.

[Let’s ask] them to have the uncomfortable conversations with the people around them, when a queer person or LGBTQ person isn’t even around. To have those conversations with their friends, their family, their co-workers, people in their lives, about queer people, about how much they love queer people, and how wonderful they think gay folks and trans folks are, and how they would like to see more of them being celebrated.

Invite them over for dinner – whatever! Let’s get them all talking and uplifting us, to show that the time for gay or queer Pride is not just when some gay person comes sauntering through, and when we’re not around is when a lot of times those harmful decisions and thoughts are being generated, I believe. And so, why not nip it in the bud?

Let’s get your big brother, who doesn’t even have a gay or trans friend, let’s get him understanding, let’s get him sitting down and watching some of these queer films we talked about, let’s get him reading some of the queer material that’s out there or talking about what’s going on against transgender people in their towns and neighbourhoods. Let’s get them involved.

David Erb 2021-05-10
img
Apple’s next big black eye to Qualcomm may come sooner than many expected, with the iPhone tipped to switch to a homegrown 5G modem design in 2023 according to a new analyst report. Although Apple designs a significant number of iPhone components itself, including the primary A-series chipset, it still relies on third-party modems for the smartphones. That’s been the … Continue reading
David Erb 2021-03-26
img

Ow. Thank you sir may I have another

David Erb 2021-03-18
img
The Scion Asset Management boss has tweeted about market bubbles and criticized Tesla, bitcoin, Robinhood, and the GameStop buying frenzy this year.
David Erb 2021-02-10
img
Michigan state Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey was recorded spreading conspiracies about the Capitol riot.
David Erb 2020-09-28
img
Accounts have reportedly been created for more than two dozen universities and colleges.
David Erb 2020-08-12
img
Amazon has stacked up loads of great shows to watch. Here are some of the best.
David Erb 2021-06-25
img

Millions of women around the world use an IUD, also known as a copper coil, as contraception. If fitted properly, it can be more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. 

But for some women, there’s a big catch: the pain. On social media, women have been sharing their experiences of insertion and removal, calling for greater awareness and better pain relief options. 

It all started when Cardiff-based entrepreneur Lucy Cohen launched a petition calling for more pain relief options for women have the coil inserted. Her petition was shared by feminist campaigner and author Caroline Criado Perez, which then sparked a column by journalist Caitlin Moran, who shared her own painful experience and called for all women to be offered a local anaesthetic with treatment. 

Before long, other women were publicly sharing their experiences, including BBC Breakfast presenter Naga Munchetty, who said her IUD insertion was so painful, she fainted twice and her husband could hear her screaming from the waiting room. He was so shocked, he tried to find out which room she was in so he could intervene. 

It’s important to point out though, that many women have IUDs fitted with no problems at all and for these women, it can offer a great hormone-free alternative to contraceptives such as the pill. 

So why do some experience such intense pain with the coil while others don’t? 

Put simply, our bodies and medical histories are different, says Dr Shree Datta, consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist at The Lister Hospital. 

“This depends on the individual person, the shape and size of their womb, whether they have taken pain relief or had a coil inserted previously and whether they have had children,” she tells HuffPost UK.

“It can also depend on how easy the procedure to insert the coil is and how long the procedure takes. Some women tolerate medical procedures to the womb better than others. Often (but not always!) women who have had normal deliveries of their babies find the pain much less severe – but this is compared to childbirth, of course.” 

What level of pain is considered ‘normal’?

It’s common to feel some mild to moderate cramping during and after the procedure, similar to period pains, so you may like to take some pain relief beforehand. 

“The pain is usually felt when the practitioner is inserting the IUD past the cervix and into the womb and most people find the pain tolerable as it is short lived due to the short length of the procedure,” says Dr Datta. 

“If the pain you are experiencing is making you feel light headed, faint, nauseous or tearful during the procedure, let the doctor fitting the IUD know immediately.”

It’s also normal for some cramping to continue after your fitting for some time and you might experience some spotting or light bleeding, she adds. However, many people feel no pain at all.

“Following your fitting, if you experience continued pain or heavy bleeding, contact the doctor who inserted the IUD,” she says. “If you experience a fever in the days after the procedure, or a change in the nature or smell of your vaginal discharge, this could be a sign of an infection and you may need antibiotics.”

And if you’ve already had a coil fitted...

Try not to panic. It’s understandable if recent social media discussion has made you worried about having your IUD removed, but the removal procedure “should be less painful and quicker than having the IUD fitted,” according to the sexual health charity Brook. If you no longer want to keep your coil, it can be taken out at any time by a specially trained doctor or nurse. 

A small percentage of women do experience problems with the coil and may need it removed sooner. 

“During the first few months after having your IUD fitted, there is a small chance your device could move or that your body could reject the device and expel it, so it’s a good idea to learn how to self-examine for the threads that hang down from the coil,” says Dr Datta. 

“These are usually felt in the vagina and your doctor will show you how to check for these at the time of coil insertion. You should check these strings regularly to ensure your coil is in the correct place. If you are unable to feel the IUD strings, this could mean that the IUD isn’t in the correct place or has been expelled, so you could fall pregnant.”

If your partner can feel the IUD during sex, you have continued severe pain that doesn’t go away after having the IUD fitted or you have persistently heavy or abnormal bleeding, it’s also worth consulting your doctor.

“Keep a record of the bleeding in a diary or app, so you get an idea of how the coil is affecting your periods,” says Dr Datta. “If you experience any unusual discharge after your fitting, or you have a fever, this could be signs of an infection and you should contact your doctor straight away. ”

David Erb 2021-05-26
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