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Felton Woodall 2021-07-20
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Goodbye Hermes, hello WNYC tote bag: There's a new way to signal you're better than everyone else, and Carrie Bradshaw knows exactly what that is.
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Felton Woodall 2021-03-08
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The company, Zogo, topped 100,000 users last year, and just signed a partnership with American Express.
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0
Felton Woodall 2020-12-22
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The fast-food chain unveils a real gaming console powered by Intel that keeps your fried chicken warm while you play video games.
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0
Felton Woodall 2019-08-22
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Netflix and Hulu released dueling documentaries earlier this year about the Fyre Festival, the legendary failed music festival that ended in its founder being sent to prison for fraud.

We looked at six headline-grabbing scandals and the TV and movies shows that are being made based on them.

The infamous Fyre Festival, founded by convicted fraudster Billy McFarland, presented an obvious story to dig into that viewers would eat up: what was touted as a luxury music festival scammed prospective festival-goers out of thousands of dollars and left them stranded on a secluded island in the Bahamas.

Three projects are already in development about the financier Jeffrey Epstein, who was arrested on suspicion of sex trafficking last month and died by suicide earlier this month in a Manhattan correctional facility.

Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images

Three projects are in the works about financier Jeffrey Epstein, who was arrested in July on suspicion of sex trafficking minors before dying by suicide in a Manhattan correctional facility earlier this month.

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Felton Woodall 2021-05-10
img
AAOS nails the car platform fundamentals, but it needs more apps and features.
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0
Felton Woodall 2021-02-28
img
It's time for some heart-wrenching exposition. And you should stick around for the credits again.
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0
Felton Woodall 2020-08-27
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Image: EA / Motive Studios

EA has debuted a new gameplay trailer for Motive’s upcoming Star Wars: Squadron during the Gamescom opening night live stream, giving another look at the single-player campaign for the starfighter pilot simulator.

The new trailer shows off how players will jump into the role of two conflicting pilots — one from the Empire and one from the New Republic — in alternating missions. There are also cameos from film characters, like Wedge Antilles.

Most of the trailer focuses on an Imperial mission that sees players flying behind enemy lines to infiltrate a New Republic base, escort a shuttle, and help escape with the intelligence. While Squadrons will largely focus on five-versus-five dogfights and larger multiplayer fleet battles, the...

Continue reading…

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Felton Woodall 2019-08-21
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We’ve gone beyond just talking about when robots enter the workforce, and actually made it happen.

Bots might not threaten livelihoods of writers any time soon (if ever), but there’s one thing I forgot to consider: how it feels to have a never-tiring, high-performing robot colleague.

Satoshi doesn’t need to sleep, feel inspired, or even have a drop of coffee to excel at his job.

And some of my colleagues shared my worries: “I read this message whilst eating my cereal, it ruined it” and a simple, emotionally-charged “ugh.” While others didn’t mind because it frees us up for other stuff, “assuming we still have a job, of course.”

We probably don’t need to worry though, as bots will never reach human-level of creativity.

What I want to do in my role could be summed up as writing good articles — an incredibly elusive and indefinable concept.

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0
Felton Woodall 2021-04-02
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Two men named Jared Kushner reveal the highs and lows of being confused for the former senior presidential advisor.
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Felton Woodall 2021-02-25
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A wild and ailing sheep found in a forest in Australia, named Baarack by rescuers, has yielded a fleece weighing more than 78 pounds - nearly half the weight of an adult kangaroo - after being shorn for the first time in many a year.

The sheep was found by a member of the public who contacted the Edgar’s Mission Farm Sanctuary near Lancefield, Victoria, about 60 kilometres north of Melbourne, according to the Mission’s Kyle Behrend.

“It would appear Baarack was once an owned sheep,” said Behrend, “he had at one time been ear-tagged, however, these appear to have been torn out by the thick matted fleece around his face.

“Sheep need to be shorn at least annually otherwise the fleece continues to grow and grow, as happened here,” said Behrend. After his much-needed shearing, Behrend said Baarack’s fleece weighed in at 78 pounds.

“Whilst his hooves were in great condition from running over the rocks in the forest, he was in a bit of a bad way. He was underweight, and due to all of the wool around his face he could barely see.”

Baarack is now settling in with other rescued sheep at Edgar’s Mission, Behrend said, adding it “all goes to show what incredibly resilient and brave animals sheep really are and we could not love them any more if we tried.

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Felton Woodall 2020-08-07

Google CEO Sundar Pichai Alphabet tech antitrust hearing

  • Google reportedly trains new employees to avoid using certain words that may jeopardize the company in antitrust backlash down the line, per a report from The Markup.
  • The off-limits words include "unique," "dominant," "the leader," and "unmatched," among others. Google also reminds employees to avoid sending a message that the firm is out to 'crush,' 'kill,' 'hurt,' 'block,' or do anything else that might be perceived as evil or unfair."
  • A company spokesperson told The Markup that it has had these training guides in place for employees for "well over a decade."
  • The report comes as Google remains embroiled in multiple antitrust investigations both in the US and in Europe.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Alphabet, Google's parent company, reportedly trains new employees to not use certain words that may come back to haunt the firm in antitrust backlash.

According to a report from The Markup, the company's list of words and phrases that are off-limits includes "the leader" and "market share." Instead of saying "unique," employees could say "new" or "alternative." And in place of "dominant," employees could use "successful," according to one of the documents, which the outlet uploaded to a cloud file. Employees across various departments, from engineering to sales, receive the training according to the report.

"Alphabet gets sued a lot, and we have our fair share of regulatory investigations," one internal document reads, according to the outlet. "Assume every document will become public."

Lawmakers that are currently probing Google and other firms over antitrust concerns are tasked with identifying a number of factors before being able to take legal action against the companies, one of which is establishing that they do in fact have dominance in the market.

Search is Google's most profitable business product, and the company operating 90% of all search queries. But according to documents, the company instructs employees to discuss market dominance carefully. 

"We use the term 'User Preference for Google Search' and never the term market share," reads the document.

Another factor lawmakers have to prove is that companies are harming consumers and small business owners. In another internal file, the company reminds employees to "always include at least one" example of how business decisions are designed to benefit the public.

"We are not out to 'crush,' 'kill,' 'hurt,' 'block,' or do anything else that might be perceived as evil or unfair," one of the documents reads according to The Markup. "Microsoft famously got into trouble when one of their employees threatened to 'cut off Netscape's air supply.'"

Company spokesperson Julie Tarallo McAlister told Business Insider: "These are completely standard competition law compliance trainings that most large companies provide to their employees. We instruct employees to compete fairly and build great products, rather than focus or opine on competitors. We've had these trainings in place for well over a decade."

The report surfaces as Google remains tied up in multiple antitrust investigations in the US and in Europe, including a congressional probe into the firm as well as into Amazon, Apple, and Facebook over concerns regarding anti-competitive business practices.

Read the full report on The Markup here.

SEE ALSO: Big Tech's CEOs testified in a historic antitrust hearing. Now what?

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know

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Felton Woodall 2019-06-20
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Right on schedule, three different cybersecurity firms now say they've watched Iran's hackers try to gain access to a wide array of US organizations over the past few weeks, just as military tensions between the two countries rise to a breaking point—though it's not yet clear whether those hacker intrusions are aimed at intelligence gathering, laying the groundwork for a more disruptive cyberattack, or both.

Analysts at two security firms, Crowdstrike and Dragos, tell WIRED that they've seen a new campaign of targeted phishing emails sent to a variety of US targets last week from a hacker group known by the names APT33, Magnallium, or Refined Kitten and widely believed to be working in the service of the Iranian government.

Some signs suggest the new targeting campaign is indeed a cyberespionage operation, an expected step from Iran given the rising saber-rattling between its government and that of the US—amid Iran's claim to have downed a US drone that breached its airspace and the Trump administration issuing warnings that it may retaliate.

FireEye has previously warned that while APT33 has in prior operations largely focused on traditional spying, it has also at times appeared to have destructive tools in its arsenal.

In 2017, FireEye reported that APT33 infected some victims with "dropper" malware that had in other attacks been used to plant a piece of data-destroying code known as ShapeShift.

In at least some of last week's intrusion attempts, the hackers sent potential victims an email lure posing as a job opening from the Council of Economic Advisors, an organization within the White House's Executive Office of the President.

collect
0
Felton Woodall 2021-03-27
img
Most customers were sports fans and festival-goers, but the company pivoted to fit around COVID changes last year.
collect
0
Felton Woodall 2021-01-19
img
Two bankruptcies almost killed Hostess Twinkies. But two guys with a wild plan set out to save the iconic American brand.
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0
Felton Woodall 2019-10-28
img

Orphan Black, BBC America's TV show about a woman who (spoiler) sees a clone of herself on a subway platform, is making bold new tracks in a very different medium.

The series seemed to end for good in 2017, but its star Tatiana Maslany is back with Orphan Black: The Next Chapter, an audiobook that picks up eight years from when the show left off.

You can download the audiobook from Serial Box, an audiobook and ebook app that released the first Orphan Black episode earlier in September.

The episodes are over an hour long, with six out of the 11 available so far -- a new episode is released each Thursday.

The fifth and final series ended with Cosima (played by Maslany) and Delphine (Evelyn Brochu), two scientists in love, committing to a globe-trotting journey inoculating 274 clones slowly dying from genetic illness.

That's largely thanks to Maslany, a 10-year improv veteran who won the Canadian Improv Games in 2002 during high school.

collect
0
Felton Woodall 2019-06-16
img

Since deepfakes emerged in December 2017, most media coverage has focused on their potentially catastrophic applications.

These range from deepfake pornography, ransomfakes, smear campaigns against politicians, and a new age of fake news that could worsen the global ‘post-truth’ crisis.

While these malicious uses of deepfakes and synthetic media are rightly a cause for concern, there are also positive uses of the same generative AI technologies.

Similarly, DeepEmpathy, a project by MIT and Unicef, creates synthetic images that show what cities such as London and Tokyo would look like if they were bombed, with the aim of fostering empathy with those fleeing from war.

While governments and businesses are scrambling to counter the explicitly negative uses of synthetic media, and harness the positive ones, greyfakes are quietly developing under far less scrutiny.

The result may be that an actor’s death simply leads to the creation of their synthetic twin that continues to feature in films or TV shows.

collect
0
Felton Woodall 2021-07-20
img
Goodbye Hermes, hello WNYC tote bag: There's a new way to signal you're better than everyone else, and Carrie Bradshaw knows exactly what that is.
Felton Woodall 2021-04-02
img
Two men named Jared Kushner reveal the highs and lows of being confused for the former senior presidential advisor.
Felton Woodall 2021-03-08
img
The company, Zogo, topped 100,000 users last year, and just signed a partnership with American Express.
Felton Woodall 2021-02-25
img

A wild and ailing sheep found in a forest in Australia, named Baarack by rescuers, has yielded a fleece weighing more than 78 pounds - nearly half the weight of an adult kangaroo - after being shorn for the first time in many a year.

The sheep was found by a member of the public who contacted the Edgar’s Mission Farm Sanctuary near Lancefield, Victoria, about 60 kilometres north of Melbourne, according to the Mission’s Kyle Behrend.

“It would appear Baarack was once an owned sheep,” said Behrend, “he had at one time been ear-tagged, however, these appear to have been torn out by the thick matted fleece around his face.

“Sheep need to be shorn at least annually otherwise the fleece continues to grow and grow, as happened here,” said Behrend. After his much-needed shearing, Behrend said Baarack’s fleece weighed in at 78 pounds.

“Whilst his hooves were in great condition from running over the rocks in the forest, he was in a bit of a bad way. He was underweight, and due to all of the wool around his face he could barely see.”

Baarack is now settling in with other rescued sheep at Edgar’s Mission, Behrend said, adding it “all goes to show what incredibly resilient and brave animals sheep really are and we could not love them any more if we tried.

Felton Woodall 2020-12-22
img
The fast-food chain unveils a real gaming console powered by Intel that keeps your fried chicken warm while you play video games.
Felton Woodall 2020-08-07

Google CEO Sundar Pichai Alphabet tech antitrust hearing

  • Google reportedly trains new employees to avoid using certain words that may jeopardize the company in antitrust backlash down the line, per a report from The Markup.
  • The off-limits words include "unique," "dominant," "the leader," and "unmatched," among others. Google also reminds employees to avoid sending a message that the firm is out to 'crush,' 'kill,' 'hurt,' 'block,' or do anything else that might be perceived as evil or unfair."
  • A company spokesperson told The Markup that it has had these training guides in place for employees for "well over a decade."
  • The report comes as Google remains embroiled in multiple antitrust investigations both in the US and in Europe.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Alphabet, Google's parent company, reportedly trains new employees to not use certain words that may come back to haunt the firm in antitrust backlash.

According to a report from The Markup, the company's list of words and phrases that are off-limits includes "the leader" and "market share." Instead of saying "unique," employees could say "new" or "alternative." And in place of "dominant," employees could use "successful," according to one of the documents, which the outlet uploaded to a cloud file. Employees across various departments, from engineering to sales, receive the training according to the report.

"Alphabet gets sued a lot, and we have our fair share of regulatory investigations," one internal document reads, according to the outlet. "Assume every document will become public."

Lawmakers that are currently probing Google and other firms over antitrust concerns are tasked with identifying a number of factors before being able to take legal action against the companies, one of which is establishing that they do in fact have dominance in the market.

Search is Google's most profitable business product, and the company operating 90% of all search queries. But according to documents, the company instructs employees to discuss market dominance carefully. 

"We use the term 'User Preference for Google Search' and never the term market share," reads the document.

Another factor lawmakers have to prove is that companies are harming consumers and small business owners. In another internal file, the company reminds employees to "always include at least one" example of how business decisions are designed to benefit the public.

"We are not out to 'crush,' 'kill,' 'hurt,' 'block,' or do anything else that might be perceived as evil or unfair," one of the documents reads according to The Markup. "Microsoft famously got into trouble when one of their employees threatened to 'cut off Netscape's air supply.'"

Company spokesperson Julie Tarallo McAlister told Business Insider: "These are completely standard competition law compliance trainings that most large companies provide to their employees. We instruct employees to compete fairly and build great products, rather than focus or opine on competitors. We've had these trainings in place for well over a decade."

The report surfaces as Google remains tied up in multiple antitrust investigations in the US and in Europe, including a congressional probe into the firm as well as into Amazon, Apple, and Facebook over concerns regarding anti-competitive business practices.

Read the full report on The Markup here.

SEE ALSO: Big Tech's CEOs testified in a historic antitrust hearing. Now what?

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know

Felton Woodall 2019-08-22
img

Netflix and Hulu released dueling documentaries earlier this year about the Fyre Festival, the legendary failed music festival that ended in its founder being sent to prison for fraud.

We looked at six headline-grabbing scandals and the TV and movies shows that are being made based on them.

The infamous Fyre Festival, founded by convicted fraudster Billy McFarland, presented an obvious story to dig into that viewers would eat up: what was touted as a luxury music festival scammed prospective festival-goers out of thousands of dollars and left them stranded on a secluded island in the Bahamas.

Three projects are already in development about the financier Jeffrey Epstein, who was arrested on suspicion of sex trafficking last month and died by suicide earlier this month in a Manhattan correctional facility.

Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images

Three projects are in the works about financier Jeffrey Epstein, who was arrested in July on suspicion of sex trafficking minors before dying by suicide in a Manhattan correctional facility earlier this month.

Felton Woodall 2019-06-20
img

Right on schedule, three different cybersecurity firms now say they've watched Iran's hackers try to gain access to a wide array of US organizations over the past few weeks, just as military tensions between the two countries rise to a breaking point—though it's not yet clear whether those hacker intrusions are aimed at intelligence gathering, laying the groundwork for a more disruptive cyberattack, or both.

Analysts at two security firms, Crowdstrike and Dragos, tell WIRED that they've seen a new campaign of targeted phishing emails sent to a variety of US targets last week from a hacker group known by the names APT33, Magnallium, or Refined Kitten and widely believed to be working in the service of the Iranian government.

Some signs suggest the new targeting campaign is indeed a cyberespionage operation, an expected step from Iran given the rising saber-rattling between its government and that of the US—amid Iran's claim to have downed a US drone that breached its airspace and the Trump administration issuing warnings that it may retaliate.

FireEye has previously warned that while APT33 has in prior operations largely focused on traditional spying, it has also at times appeared to have destructive tools in its arsenal.

In 2017, FireEye reported that APT33 infected some victims with "dropper" malware that had in other attacks been used to plant a piece of data-destroying code known as ShapeShift.

In at least some of last week's intrusion attempts, the hackers sent potential victims an email lure posing as a job opening from the Council of Economic Advisors, an organization within the White House's Executive Office of the President.

Felton Woodall 2021-05-10
img
AAOS nails the car platform fundamentals, but it needs more apps and features.
Felton Woodall 2021-03-27
img
Most customers were sports fans and festival-goers, but the company pivoted to fit around COVID changes last year.
Felton Woodall 2021-02-28
img
It's time for some heart-wrenching exposition. And you should stick around for the credits again.
Felton Woodall 2021-01-19
img
Two bankruptcies almost killed Hostess Twinkies. But two guys with a wild plan set out to save the iconic American brand.
Felton Woodall 2020-08-27
img
Image: EA / Motive Studios

EA has debuted a new gameplay trailer for Motive’s upcoming Star Wars: Squadron during the Gamescom opening night live stream, giving another look at the single-player campaign for the starfighter pilot simulator.

The new trailer shows off how players will jump into the role of two conflicting pilots — one from the Empire and one from the New Republic — in alternating missions. There are also cameos from film characters, like Wedge Antilles.

Most of the trailer focuses on an Imperial mission that sees players flying behind enemy lines to infiltrate a New Republic base, escort a shuttle, and help escape with the intelligence. While Squadrons will largely focus on five-versus-five dogfights and larger multiplayer fleet battles, the...

Continue reading…

Felton Woodall 2019-10-28
img

Orphan Black, BBC America's TV show about a woman who (spoiler) sees a clone of herself on a subway platform, is making bold new tracks in a very different medium.

The series seemed to end for good in 2017, but its star Tatiana Maslany is back with Orphan Black: The Next Chapter, an audiobook that picks up eight years from when the show left off.

You can download the audiobook from Serial Box, an audiobook and ebook app that released the first Orphan Black episode earlier in September.

The episodes are over an hour long, with six out of the 11 available so far -- a new episode is released each Thursday.

The fifth and final series ended with Cosima (played by Maslany) and Delphine (Evelyn Brochu), two scientists in love, committing to a globe-trotting journey inoculating 274 clones slowly dying from genetic illness.

That's largely thanks to Maslany, a 10-year improv veteran who won the Canadian Improv Games in 2002 during high school.

Felton Woodall 2019-08-21
img

We’ve gone beyond just talking about when robots enter the workforce, and actually made it happen.

Bots might not threaten livelihoods of writers any time soon (if ever), but there’s one thing I forgot to consider: how it feels to have a never-tiring, high-performing robot colleague.

Satoshi doesn’t need to sleep, feel inspired, or even have a drop of coffee to excel at his job.

And some of my colleagues shared my worries: “I read this message whilst eating my cereal, it ruined it” and a simple, emotionally-charged “ugh.” While others didn’t mind because it frees us up for other stuff, “assuming we still have a job, of course.”

We probably don’t need to worry though, as bots will never reach human-level of creativity.

What I want to do in my role could be summed up as writing good articles — an incredibly elusive and indefinable concept.

Felton Woodall 2019-06-16
img

Since deepfakes emerged in December 2017, most media coverage has focused on their potentially catastrophic applications.

These range from deepfake pornography, ransomfakes, smear campaigns against politicians, and a new age of fake news that could worsen the global ‘post-truth’ crisis.

While these malicious uses of deepfakes and synthetic media are rightly a cause for concern, there are also positive uses of the same generative AI technologies.

Similarly, DeepEmpathy, a project by MIT and Unicef, creates synthetic images that show what cities such as London and Tokyo would look like if they were bombed, with the aim of fostering empathy with those fleeing from war.

While governments and businesses are scrambling to counter the explicitly negative uses of synthetic media, and harness the positive ones, greyfakes are quietly developing under far less scrutiny.

The result may be that an actor’s death simply leads to the creation of their synthetic twin that continues to feature in films or TV shows.