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Garland Marsella 2021-06-03
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Paxton Smith dropped her pre-approved speech and instead attacked Gov. Greg Abbott's anti-abortion law.
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Garland Marsella 2021-03-29
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The FBI has issued a warning against "malicious actors" using synthetic content like deepfakes to wage campaigns for trade and impact purposes.
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0
Garland Marsella 2021-01-12
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Porsche takes design cues from the original Boxster concept for this 25th anniversary special.
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0
Garland Marsella 2019-09-17
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It’s still early days, but scientists say this year’s version is behaving unusually and that it has the potential to be the smallest hole observed in over three decades.

Yesterday was International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, and so we present to you some good news about Earth’s atmosphere.

Recent observations by the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) – a European Union-run service that continually monitors the state of the atmosphere – suggests the 2019 ozone hole above Antarctica “could have the smallest area of any Antarctic ozone hole since the mid-eighties,” according to a CAMS press release issued on September 9, 2019.

The ozone hole forms every year during the Antarctic spring, starting in late August and ending in December, during which time the amount of ozone in the Earth’s stratosphere above Antarctica can be depleted by as much as 60 percent.

“This year, we have seen that the ozone hole has been particularly unusual,” Antje Inness, a senior scientist at CAMS, said in today’s press release.

“Although it started growing relatively early, at the beginning of September a sudden warming of the stratosphere disturbed the cold polar vortex that gives rise to the ozone hole.”

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0
Garland Marsella 2021-05-27
img
The cast of Panic reveal how Amazon Prime Video’s latest teen series draws parallels with properties including The Maze Runner.
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0
Garland Marsella 2021-03-25
img

Thousands of cancer cases could be prevented every year with simple lifestyle changes, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has said.

The charity funded new research that looked at the impact of diet, exercise and lifestyle habits on colorectal cancer (a type of bowel cancer that begins in the colon or the rectum). It found 67% of UK colorectal cancer cases in men and 60% of colorectal cancer cases in women are preventable with lifestyle factors.

The researchers also estimated that lifestyle factors are responsible for 27% of breast cancer cases in women. 

The study examined data from the Health Surveys of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland as well as from two other ongoing studies, including the UK Biobank database.

The study concluded that people could reduce their cancer risk by: 

1. Increasing fibre in your diet 

The WCRF said insufficient intake of dietary fibre is the highest lifestyle risk factor for colorectal cancer cases. The charity has estimated that more than 12,000 cases could be prevented in the UK each year if this was addressed.

In order to reap the benefits, it’s recommended adults eat 30g of fibre per day. Foods like cereal, granary bread and nuts contain a lot of fibre – find out more here

2. Cutting processed meat consumption 

Processed meat consumption has been linked to more than 5,000 cancer cases in the UK every year, WCRF said.

Recent research also found regular meat consumption is linked with a higher risk of various diseases, including heart disease, pneumonia and diabetes.

3. Cutting down on alcohol 

The charity said alcohol consumption is the highest risk factor for breast cancer among women – with drinking linked to an estimated 4,487 cases each year.

4. Ditching sugary drinks

Having a high BMI was found to be another significant risk factor for breast cancer. Although sugary drinks haven’t been directly linked to cancer, they are a common contributor to weight gain. 

“If you regularly drink sugary drinks, or drink them in large portions you are more likely to be consuming more calories than you burn,” WCRF says on its website. 

5. Upping your exercise 

Having a low level of physical activity was associated with a higher breast cancer risk. Inactivity has also previously been linked to higher levels of bowel and womb cancer. Our guide on taking your first steps into exercise might help you get moving. 

“These new UK figures give a clear indication of the simple lifestyle changes we can all make to decrease our likelihood of a cancer diagnosis,” Rachael Gormley, chief executive of World Cancer Research Fund UK, said.

“With the coronavirus pandemic continuing to have an impact on people’s outcomes and experience of cancer care, knowing how to reduce your risk has never been more vital.”

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2021-01-06
img
There are loads of great television series from the U.K., so we've sifted through them to bring you the best British TV shows on Netflix!
collect
0
Garland Marsella 2019-08-07
img

Phone launches happen a lot, and for the most part they're really dull.

Even the most rabid of fans isn't going to be interested about half the stuff a company has to say, because all we care about is how much the damn thing is going to cost this time.

Samsung's Galaxy Unpacked kicks off tonight at 9pm, and with it we've decided it'll be a good idea to bring back the bingo cards.

They're not reserved for Apple events anymore, kids, so buckle up and let's make fun of a billion-dollar multinational company.

Here's your card for the night, with a bunch of scenarios that may or may not happen.

And maybe a couple that definitely won't, but we can do some wishful thinking.

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2021-05-24
img
Quibi was a disaster, but that doesn't mean all its shows were too. Now rebranded Roku Originals, they include these six worth watching.
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0
Garland Marsella 2021-01-26
img
“We've got a ship in duress that hasn't sent out a distress signal. Something doesn't add up.”
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0
Garland Marsella 2020-09-05
img
Macs aren't known for gaming, but they can still boast high performance -- and a long list of great games.
collect
0
Garland Marsella 2019-08-06
img

Maybe its ordering an Uber, downloading a document or doing online banking, only for poor performance to be the buzzkill.

When you are down the pub and jealously looking over at the streaming power your mate’s device can conjure, the first question is always the same; who is your contract provider?

This usually leads to a moan about one telco being terrible, but they are cheaper, so it’s not the end of the world.

Now, some telcos are certainly better at delivering performance than others, but it is not the only factor which should be considered.

“All smartphones are not created equal,” Ian Fogg, Opensignal’s VP of Analysis, wrote in the report.

Australia is another market where the iLeader came up short.

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2021-05-21
img
Testosterone is a good thing, but too much or not enough can cause trouble.
collect
0
Garland Marsella 2021-01-13
img
Amazon cited Section 230 to refute Parler's claims that Amazon conspired with Twitter to hurt Parler's business by banning it from using Amazon Web Services.
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0
Garland Marsella 2020-09-02
img

People have been left “in tears” by the government’s U-turn on local lockdowns in Greater Manchester as they have been forced to cancel plans to see their families, a senior Tory has said.

Sir Graham Brady, who chairs the powerful backbench Tory 1922 Committee, said he was “very disappointed” at health secretary Matt Hancock’s move to reverse last Friday’s decision to lift restrictions in Trafford in defiance of the council.

It came after Labour mayor for Greater Manchester Andy Burnham said easing the guidance restricting social gatherings in people’s homes in Trafford and Bolton would be “completely illogical” in the face of rising infections.

The reversal in both boroughs also marked the government’s 12th policy U-turn since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic and will only increase the pressure on Boris Johnson, who has been warned by his own MPs to “get a grip”.

Brady, whose constituency is in Trafford, said he was “very disappointed” on behalf of residents who contacted him last week saying “how relieved they were to be able to see their families again”.

Sir Graham Brady.

The Altrincham and Sale West MP told HuffPost UK: “I’ve had people today saying to me that their mothers or sisters have been in tears because the grandchildren can’t see their grandparents.

“They had arranged things for tonight, or tomorrow or the next weekend or whatever.

“So the emotional hit of being told you can do things, and then you can’t has been really quite bad for a lot of people.”

Brady added: “People are upset that it is illegal once again to meet their families.”

The government had decided social gatherings between two homes can resume for the first time in weeks from Wednesday in the two boroughs as well as Stockport, Burnley, Hyndburn and parts of Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees.

But a sharp increase in the local infection rate in Bolton and Trafford led to council leaders pleading with the government for a delay just hours before restrictions were lifted.

The government decided to act in Trafford after the rate of new coronavirus cases jumped from 17.8 per 100,000 people in the seven days to August 20 to 36.8 in the seven days to August 31.

A government source said earlier: “So there’s been a huge increase – when the data changes, we act decisively.”

But Brady called for more data, including hospitalisations and death rates, to be used in judging whether to lock down certain areas.

“If you are basing the decision entirely on that metric (infection rates per 100,000) and on which direction that metric is moving, then of course I can understand why the decision has been taken,” he said.

“But other metrics have been more positive.

“As yet, even though we had a spike in cases in Trafford in July, there appears to be no evidence of that translating into an increase in hospital admissions.

“In July, when we were put into the extra restrictions we had falling cases.

“Having had a month or so of the extra restrictions, we now have rising cases.

“But the trends on the more important issues of hospital admissions and fatalities continue, thank heavens, to go in the right direction.”

He said the government is concerned by evidence from other countries suggesting a spike in positive cases could lead to an increase in hospitalisations.

“It could happen here but it hasn’t,” he said. ”And if it were, one might take a tougher approach.

“But while it isn’t there is a very strong case for taking a wider view and including more metrics to make a judgment, given these restrictions are quite extreme and interfere with basic human rights.”

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2019-08-01
img

Doctor Who will be streaming exclusively on HBO Max next year, CNET sister site TV Guide reported Thursday.

All 11 seasons will be coming to the platform in spring 2020, when WarnerMedia's new streaming service launches.

Doctor Who, now starring its first female doctor Jodie Whittaker, completed its 11th series at the end of last year with the highest ratings in a decade for the show.

Series 12 could hit in 2020.

Once new seasons have been aired on BBC America, HBO Max said Thursday it will be the exclusive streaming home for Doctor Who.

Also coming to HBO Max are Friends, Game of Thrones, Sex and the City, The Sopranos, Veep, the Gossip Girl sequel and Sesame Street, and movies including Wonder Woman and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

collect
0
Garland Marsella 2021-06-03
img
Paxton Smith dropped her pre-approved speech and instead attacked Gov. Greg Abbott's anti-abortion law.
Garland Marsella 2021-05-24
img
Quibi was a disaster, but that doesn't mean all its shows were too. Now rebranded Roku Originals, they include these six worth watching.
Garland Marsella 2021-03-29
img
The FBI has issued a warning against "malicious actors" using synthetic content like deepfakes to wage campaigns for trade and impact purposes.
Garland Marsella 2021-01-26
img
“We've got a ship in duress that hasn't sent out a distress signal. Something doesn't add up.”
Garland Marsella 2021-01-12
img
Porsche takes design cues from the original Boxster concept for this 25th anniversary special.
Garland Marsella 2020-09-05
img
Macs aren't known for gaming, but they can still boast high performance -- and a long list of great games.
Garland Marsella 2019-09-17
img

It’s still early days, but scientists say this year’s version is behaving unusually and that it has the potential to be the smallest hole observed in over three decades.

Yesterday was International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, and so we present to you some good news about Earth’s atmosphere.

Recent observations by the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) – a European Union-run service that continually monitors the state of the atmosphere – suggests the 2019 ozone hole above Antarctica “could have the smallest area of any Antarctic ozone hole since the mid-eighties,” according to a CAMS press release issued on September 9, 2019.

The ozone hole forms every year during the Antarctic spring, starting in late August and ending in December, during which time the amount of ozone in the Earth’s stratosphere above Antarctica can be depleted by as much as 60 percent.

“This year, we have seen that the ozone hole has been particularly unusual,” Antje Inness, a senior scientist at CAMS, said in today’s press release.

“Although it started growing relatively early, at the beginning of September a sudden warming of the stratosphere disturbed the cold polar vortex that gives rise to the ozone hole.”

Garland Marsella 2019-08-06
img

Maybe its ordering an Uber, downloading a document or doing online banking, only for poor performance to be the buzzkill.

When you are down the pub and jealously looking over at the streaming power your mate’s device can conjure, the first question is always the same; who is your contract provider?

This usually leads to a moan about one telco being terrible, but they are cheaper, so it’s not the end of the world.

Now, some telcos are certainly better at delivering performance than others, but it is not the only factor which should be considered.

“All smartphones are not created equal,” Ian Fogg, Opensignal’s VP of Analysis, wrote in the report.

Australia is another market where the iLeader came up short.

Garland Marsella 2021-05-27
img
The cast of Panic reveal how Amazon Prime Video’s latest teen series draws parallels with properties including The Maze Runner.
Garland Marsella 2021-05-21
img
Testosterone is a good thing, but too much or not enough can cause trouble.
Garland Marsella 2021-03-25
img

Thousands of cancer cases could be prevented every year with simple lifestyle changes, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has said.

The charity funded new research that looked at the impact of diet, exercise and lifestyle habits on colorectal cancer (a type of bowel cancer that begins in the colon or the rectum). It found 67% of UK colorectal cancer cases in men and 60% of colorectal cancer cases in women are preventable with lifestyle factors.

The researchers also estimated that lifestyle factors are responsible for 27% of breast cancer cases in women. 

The study examined data from the Health Surveys of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland as well as from two other ongoing studies, including the UK Biobank database.

The study concluded that people could reduce their cancer risk by: 

1. Increasing fibre in your diet 

The WCRF said insufficient intake of dietary fibre is the highest lifestyle risk factor for colorectal cancer cases. The charity has estimated that more than 12,000 cases could be prevented in the UK each year if this was addressed.

In order to reap the benefits, it’s recommended adults eat 30g of fibre per day. Foods like cereal, granary bread and nuts contain a lot of fibre – find out more here

2. Cutting processed meat consumption 

Processed meat consumption has been linked to more than 5,000 cancer cases in the UK every year, WCRF said.

Recent research also found regular meat consumption is linked with a higher risk of various diseases, including heart disease, pneumonia and diabetes.

3. Cutting down on alcohol 

The charity said alcohol consumption is the highest risk factor for breast cancer among women – with drinking linked to an estimated 4,487 cases each year.

4. Ditching sugary drinks

Having a high BMI was found to be another significant risk factor for breast cancer. Although sugary drinks haven’t been directly linked to cancer, they are a common contributor to weight gain. 

“If you regularly drink sugary drinks, or drink them in large portions you are more likely to be consuming more calories than you burn,” WCRF says on its website. 

5. Upping your exercise 

Having a low level of physical activity was associated with a higher breast cancer risk. Inactivity has also previously been linked to higher levels of bowel and womb cancer. Our guide on taking your first steps into exercise might help you get moving. 

“These new UK figures give a clear indication of the simple lifestyle changes we can all make to decrease our likelihood of a cancer diagnosis,” Rachael Gormley, chief executive of World Cancer Research Fund UK, said.

“With the coronavirus pandemic continuing to have an impact on people’s outcomes and experience of cancer care, knowing how to reduce your risk has never been more vital.”

Garland Marsella 2021-01-13
img
Amazon cited Section 230 to refute Parler's claims that Amazon conspired with Twitter to hurt Parler's business by banning it from using Amazon Web Services.
Garland Marsella 2021-01-06
img
There are loads of great television series from the U.K., so we've sifted through them to bring you the best British TV shows on Netflix!
Garland Marsella 2020-09-02
img

People have been left “in tears” by the government’s U-turn on local lockdowns in Greater Manchester as they have been forced to cancel plans to see their families, a senior Tory has said.

Sir Graham Brady, who chairs the powerful backbench Tory 1922 Committee, said he was “very disappointed” at health secretary Matt Hancock’s move to reverse last Friday’s decision to lift restrictions in Trafford in defiance of the council.

It came after Labour mayor for Greater Manchester Andy Burnham said easing the guidance restricting social gatherings in people’s homes in Trafford and Bolton would be “completely illogical” in the face of rising infections.

The reversal in both boroughs also marked the government’s 12th policy U-turn since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic and will only increase the pressure on Boris Johnson, who has been warned by his own MPs to “get a grip”.

Brady, whose constituency is in Trafford, said he was “very disappointed” on behalf of residents who contacted him last week saying “how relieved they were to be able to see their families again”.

Sir Graham Brady.

The Altrincham and Sale West MP told HuffPost UK: “I’ve had people today saying to me that their mothers or sisters have been in tears because the grandchildren can’t see their grandparents.

“They had arranged things for tonight, or tomorrow or the next weekend or whatever.

“So the emotional hit of being told you can do things, and then you can’t has been really quite bad for a lot of people.”

Brady added: “People are upset that it is illegal once again to meet their families.”

The government had decided social gatherings between two homes can resume for the first time in weeks from Wednesday in the two boroughs as well as Stockport, Burnley, Hyndburn and parts of Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees.

But a sharp increase in the local infection rate in Bolton and Trafford led to council leaders pleading with the government for a delay just hours before restrictions were lifted.

The government decided to act in Trafford after the rate of new coronavirus cases jumped from 17.8 per 100,000 people in the seven days to August 20 to 36.8 in the seven days to August 31.

A government source said earlier: “So there’s been a huge increase – when the data changes, we act decisively.”

But Brady called for more data, including hospitalisations and death rates, to be used in judging whether to lock down certain areas.

“If you are basing the decision entirely on that metric (infection rates per 100,000) and on which direction that metric is moving, then of course I can understand why the decision has been taken,” he said.

“But other metrics have been more positive.

“As yet, even though we had a spike in cases in Trafford in July, there appears to be no evidence of that translating into an increase in hospital admissions.

“In July, when we were put into the extra restrictions we had falling cases.

“Having had a month or so of the extra restrictions, we now have rising cases.

“But the trends on the more important issues of hospital admissions and fatalities continue, thank heavens, to go in the right direction.”

He said the government is concerned by evidence from other countries suggesting a spike in positive cases could lead to an increase in hospitalisations.

“It could happen here but it hasn’t,” he said. ”And if it were, one might take a tougher approach.

“But while it isn’t there is a very strong case for taking a wider view and including more metrics to make a judgment, given these restrictions are quite extreme and interfere with basic human rights.”

Garland Marsella 2019-08-07
img

Phone launches happen a lot, and for the most part they're really dull.

Even the most rabid of fans isn't going to be interested about half the stuff a company has to say, because all we care about is how much the damn thing is going to cost this time.

Samsung's Galaxy Unpacked kicks off tonight at 9pm, and with it we've decided it'll be a good idea to bring back the bingo cards.

They're not reserved for Apple events anymore, kids, so buckle up and let's make fun of a billion-dollar multinational company.

Here's your card for the night, with a bunch of scenarios that may or may not happen.

And maybe a couple that definitely won't, but we can do some wishful thinking.

Garland Marsella 2019-08-01
img

Doctor Who will be streaming exclusively on HBO Max next year, CNET sister site TV Guide reported Thursday.

All 11 seasons will be coming to the platform in spring 2020, when WarnerMedia's new streaming service launches.

Doctor Who, now starring its first female doctor Jodie Whittaker, completed its 11th series at the end of last year with the highest ratings in a decade for the show.

Series 12 could hit in 2020.

Once new seasons have been aired on BBC America, HBO Max said Thursday it will be the exclusive streaming home for Doctor Who.

Also coming to HBO Max are Friends, Game of Thrones, Sex and the City, The Sopranos, Veep, the Gossip Girl sequel and Sesame Street, and movies including Wonder Woman and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.