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George Starling 2021-06-29
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Eye contact is really important when you’re dating – according to the sex and relationships experts you’ll know better as this year’s Love Island contestants.

During this season’s launch episode, the girls kept citing a lack of eye contact as their reason for not stepping forward for certain boys.

And it didn’t take long for the memes to start rolling in. 

But how important is eye contact when you’re dating? Maintaining eye contact with a prospective date is a good idea, according to Jo Coker, a counselling psychologist who works with the College of Sex and Relationship Therapy – but it isn’t the be-all-end-all. 

“Eye contact is a form of communication and making eye contact with another suggests respect and that you are a good listener, as you are looking to pick up the cues in body language,” she tells HuffPost UK. “Also that you are interested in the other person. It’s also bonding and has a neurological effect on our brains releasing dopamine and oxytocin, the feel good hormones.”

Poor or no eye contact can certainly be a sign someone’s “disinterested in what you are saying or not interested or attracted to you,” she warns. It can also indicate that someone is “hiding, lying or feeling guilty” about something.

However, there are plenty of oter reasons why someone may not clock eyes with you, even if they’re totally into you. In fact, those who struggle with shyness – as Sharon seems to think Hugo does in the villa – may be avoiding your gaze precisely because they’re into you. 

“They may feel threatened or wary and unsafe,” says Coker. “They may be anxious or they may have low self esteem.”

In short, it’s a really good sign if someone is maintaining lots of eye contact on a first date – and you should try to reciprocate. But if those eyes aren’t immediately fixed on you, that alone isn’t a reason to rule them out. 

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George Starling 2021-03-24
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The “tiny dot” isn’t typically seen as a software-as-a-service hub, but that could change in the near future.
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0
George Starling 2020-09-11
img
Daniel Greene, who makes a living through his YouTube channel, recently started a podcast. It's a respite from the video sites analytics.
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0
George Starling 2020-07-14
img
A beautiful and story-rich contender for 2020's game of the year.
collect
0
George Starling 2021-05-27
img
Can an app improve your romantic relationships? The founders behind Paired, a “relationship care” app for couples, believe it can. And since launching in October, with $1M to kick things off, they’ve convinced 5,000+ coupled-up others to try their custom blend of partner quizzes, “relationship satisfaction” tracking, and audio tips from experts — to try […]
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George Starling 2021-03-18
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You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.

“The Oxford jab is safe and the Pfizer jab is safe. The thing that isn’t safe is catching Covid.” With that punchy, succinct line, Boris Johnson proved that sometimes there are merits in having a journalist as prime minister.

For all the careful, caveated hedging of Chris Whitty and medicine regulator June Raine (whose name beautifully sums up an English summer weather vibe), what was most needed was clarity and simplicity on the balanced risk of taking the AstraZeneca jab. Short of Whitty screaming ‘You want to see blood clots? See Covid patients’, it was the PM who got the message across best.

And amid worries over vaccine supply, Johnson stressed that not only was the jab programme on track but also his wider exit roadmap out of Covid restrictions was still intact. “There is no change to the next steps of the roadmap,” he said. “Our progress along the road to freedom continues unchecked.” Seeing friends, family, pubs, gyms and shops all beckoned as planned.

But that bold statement was proof of the limits of having a hack premier, or more specifically newspaper-headlines-as-policy. The PM has for weeks told us that his roadmap is all about “data not dates”, yet here he was binding himself tightly to those dates. In his desperation to reassure the public, it felt like an overreach of the “nothing to see here” variety.

It took Whitty to reassert his role as Mr Caution, pointing out that the real policy was all about assessing the evidence after each stage of the roadmap. It was “far too early to look at the data” to understand if the return of schools had made a significant impact, he said (adding that “at the moment” there was nothing flashing red lights “beyond what you’d expect”).

Johnson’s journalistic past returned to haunt him again today as The Mirror dug up some remarks from his Spectator and Telegraph columns where he described NHS nurses as “starch bosomed” and joked about how to “handle” them. Given that the PM this Wednesday vowed to attack “casual, everyday sexism”, it was a reminder of just how long the charge sheet is against him.

On our latest Commons People podcast, Labour’s Jess Phillips was blunt about all this, saying “I can’t rehabilitate Boris Johnson’s sexism, I’m not even going to try, it’s a massive waste of my time…the best way to apologise, I say this to my children: sorry is just a word, changing your behaviour and making a change is the thing that will prove to me you’re actually sorry.”

Coming months will tell us whether there is real action on violence against women and girls, yet on the Covid pandemic itself it’s the PM’s inaction that has of course been his biggest weakness. A new Resolution Foundation report estimated that delaying the winter lockdown caused up to 27,000 extra deaths in England.

The think tank also reiterated its call for higher statutory sick pay, saying this was the most “glaring failure of economic policy” of the past year. Matt Hancock is understood to be in favour of jacking up rates, presumably because he can see that it would future-proof us against the next Covid wave, allowing more people to isolate without fear of losing income. But action, not words, is still missing.

Sadly, Johnson wasn’t asked at his press conference if he agreed with Dominic Cummings on the need for an “urgent” inquiry into the pandemic. The former aide tweeted he would tell the Commons health and science committees on June 26 “why things went so catastrophically wrong”. Even though Cummings’ target is bound to be “Whitehall”, that’s one date in the diary the PM may not relish.

Meanwhile, long after his departure from No.10, Cummings’ culture war on the media appears to be lingering like a bad stench in this government. Jacob Rees-Mogg disgraced himself by attacking my colleague Arj Singh in the Commons for committing the journalistic crime of reporting the words that came out of a minister’s mouth.

A clip of Raab’s words about the need to trade with countries that lacked “ECHR-level standards of human rights” was leaked to us because FCO staff felt they were a cause for concern. Crucially, his full remarks were not a repudiation of that quote, but a validation of it. “We don’t junk whole relationships because we’ve got issues,” he added. There was no “distortion”.

But exposing both his snobbery (he claimed The Times would never report what HuffPost UK did) and his ignorance (the Times used the exact same quote on its front page), Rees-Mogg showed that beneath all the fake politesse of his concocted young fogey persona there lurks a man scared to death of scrutiny.

In that, maybe he’s just following his boss’s lead. Yet we’ll probably wait in vain for Rees-Mogg to condemn a former journalist who literally made up a quote and was sacked from the Times as a result: Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson. There’s no distorting that fact, not the most salient one of all: the 125,000 deaths and counting from Covid on their watch. 

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0
George Starling 2020-08-05
img
Comedy Central’s set its sights on one of the most raunchy and absurd cartoons to come out of the ‘90s
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0
George Starling 2019-10-09
img

Sextortion phishers are pivoting away from Bitcoin BTC to alternative cryptocurrencies to avoid being caught by email filters, ZDNet reports.

In particular, some sextortionists now rely on Litecoin, as major email providers automatically flag suspicious emails that feature Bitcoin wallet addresses.

“As this latest twist shows, threat actors can switch to the next crypto currency [sic] and attempt to iterate through all the scam’s previous versions,” said phishing analysts Cofense.

Litecoin is just sextortion flavor of the month

Sextortion phishing scams have plagued inboxes for well over a year.

They typically claim malware has infected recipient’s machines to record webcams and naughty browsing habits, demanding Bitcoin in exchange for not leaking that data to the world.

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0
George Starling 2021-05-15
img
You can't watch all 24 (or so) movies at once, so you've got to start somewhere.
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0
George Starling 2021-02-23
img
The sell-off has seen tens of billions of dollars erased from Tesla's market cap and led Elon Musk to lose his title as the world's richest person.
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0
George Starling 2020-08-04
img

For the past couple of weeks, a new tool to save your photos from facial recognition algorithms has been doing rounds. The tool, called Fawkes, is developed by researchers at the University of Chicago.  The idea of the algorithm is simple: it uses image cloaking to modify a few pixels in your existing photo to ‘fool’ facial recognition systems. To the naked eye, these changes are generally hard to catch. That’s why if you see some of the photos below, you might not see any difference between normal and cloaked photos. These changes throw off detection algorithms based on deep neural networks…

This story continues at The Next Web
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0
George Starling 2019-10-03
img

Welcome to another edition of Bitcoin Today, where I, Satoshi Nakaboto, tell you what’s been going on with Bitcoin in the past 24 hours.

We closed the day, October 2 2019, at a price of $8,393.

That’s a minor 0.58 percent increase in 24 hours, or $48.

We’re still 58 percent below Bitcoin‘s all-time high of $20,089 (December 17 2017).

Bitcoin’s market cap ended the day at $150,823,797,662.

Yesterday’s volume of $13,125,712,443 was the lowest in two days, 15 percent below the year’s average, and 70 percent below the year’s high.

collect
0
George Starling 2021-04-03
img
"We need to show our humanity. We can't let people hurt our seniors, our elders," volunteer Lisa Gold told Pix11 News.
collect
0
George Starling 2020-10-20
img
The essential ingredient, seaweed, is farmed in northern France and is said to grow faster than paper or starch
collect
0
George Starling 2020-07-30
img
DNA tests are cheap and ubiquitous. For some donor-conceived people, they can unearth long-buried truths about their ancestry—and lead to unorthodox reunions.
collect
0
George Starling 2019-08-06

It’s perhaps easier than it ever has been to imagine the US presidency as a one-man ego trip leaving wanton destruction in its wake, so it’s to Metal Wolf Chaos’ credit that it still manages to make that concept seem faintly ridiculous.

A cult classic revived for modern platforms 15 years after its debut, Metal Wolf Chaos remains one of the most gloriously over-the-top games ever made.

Released exclusively in Japan for the original Xbox, Metal Wolf Chaos was developed by From Software many years before the studio found global acclaim with its brutal action games like Dark Souls, Bloodborne, and this year’s Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice.

The intricacies of Metal Wolf Chaos’ giant robot mechanics are a less pressing point of discussion than the fact that this is a game where you play the president of the United States and pilot a mech to fight back against a coup d’etat led by, of all people, the vice president.

Playing Metal Wolf Chaos is like watching The Room — you can’t quite believe how anybody managed to write these lines, much less speak them out loud in a recording studio.

“You’ve got a conference and dinner party at the Japanese embassy regarding wildlife protection,” says ever-present radio assistant Jody in an early exchange.

collect
0
George Starling 2021-06-29
img

Eye contact is really important when you’re dating – according to the sex and relationships experts you’ll know better as this year’s Love Island contestants.

During this season’s launch episode, the girls kept citing a lack of eye contact as their reason for not stepping forward for certain boys.

And it didn’t take long for the memes to start rolling in. 

But how important is eye contact when you’re dating? Maintaining eye contact with a prospective date is a good idea, according to Jo Coker, a counselling psychologist who works with the College of Sex and Relationship Therapy – but it isn’t the be-all-end-all. 

“Eye contact is a form of communication and making eye contact with another suggests respect and that you are a good listener, as you are looking to pick up the cues in body language,” she tells HuffPost UK. “Also that you are interested in the other person. It’s also bonding and has a neurological effect on our brains releasing dopamine and oxytocin, the feel good hormones.”

Poor or no eye contact can certainly be a sign someone’s “disinterested in what you are saying or not interested or attracted to you,” she warns. It can also indicate that someone is “hiding, lying or feeling guilty” about something.

However, there are plenty of oter reasons why someone may not clock eyes with you, even if they’re totally into you. In fact, those who struggle with shyness – as Sharon seems to think Hugo does in the villa – may be avoiding your gaze precisely because they’re into you. 

“They may feel threatened or wary and unsafe,” says Coker. “They may be anxious or they may have low self esteem.”

In short, it’s a really good sign if someone is maintaining lots of eye contact on a first date – and you should try to reciprocate. But if those eyes aren’t immediately fixed on you, that alone isn’t a reason to rule them out. 

George Starling 2021-05-15
img
You can't watch all 24 (or so) movies at once, so you've got to start somewhere.
George Starling 2021-03-24
img
The “tiny dot” isn’t typically seen as a software-as-a-service hub, but that could change in the near future.
George Starling 2021-02-23
img
The sell-off has seen tens of billions of dollars erased from Tesla's market cap and led Elon Musk to lose his title as the world's richest person.
George Starling 2020-09-11
img
Daniel Greene, who makes a living through his YouTube channel, recently started a podcast. It's a respite from the video sites analytics.
George Starling 2020-08-04
img

For the past couple of weeks, a new tool to save your photos from facial recognition algorithms has been doing rounds. The tool, called Fawkes, is developed by researchers at the University of Chicago.  The idea of the algorithm is simple: it uses image cloaking to modify a few pixels in your existing photo to ‘fool’ facial recognition systems. To the naked eye, these changes are generally hard to catch. That’s why if you see some of the photos below, you might not see any difference between normal and cloaked photos. These changes throw off detection algorithms based on deep neural networks…

This story continues at The Next Web
George Starling 2020-07-14
img
A beautiful and story-rich contender for 2020's game of the year.
George Starling 2019-10-03
img

Welcome to another edition of Bitcoin Today, where I, Satoshi Nakaboto, tell you what’s been going on with Bitcoin in the past 24 hours.

We closed the day, October 2 2019, at a price of $8,393.

That’s a minor 0.58 percent increase in 24 hours, or $48.

We’re still 58 percent below Bitcoin‘s all-time high of $20,089 (December 17 2017).

Bitcoin’s market cap ended the day at $150,823,797,662.

Yesterday’s volume of $13,125,712,443 was the lowest in two days, 15 percent below the year’s average, and 70 percent below the year’s high.

George Starling 2021-05-27
img
Can an app improve your romantic relationships? The founders behind Paired, a “relationship care” app for couples, believe it can. And since launching in October, with $1M to kick things off, they’ve convinced 5,000+ coupled-up others to try their custom blend of partner quizzes, “relationship satisfaction” tracking, and audio tips from experts — to try […]
George Starling 2021-04-03
img
"We need to show our humanity. We can't let people hurt our seniors, our elders," volunteer Lisa Gold told Pix11 News.
George Starling 2021-03-18
img

You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.

“The Oxford jab is safe and the Pfizer jab is safe. The thing that isn’t safe is catching Covid.” With that punchy, succinct line, Boris Johnson proved that sometimes there are merits in having a journalist as prime minister.

For all the careful, caveated hedging of Chris Whitty and medicine regulator June Raine (whose name beautifully sums up an English summer weather vibe), what was most needed was clarity and simplicity on the balanced risk of taking the AstraZeneca jab. Short of Whitty screaming ‘You want to see blood clots? See Covid patients’, it was the PM who got the message across best.

And amid worries over vaccine supply, Johnson stressed that not only was the jab programme on track but also his wider exit roadmap out of Covid restrictions was still intact. “There is no change to the next steps of the roadmap,” he said. “Our progress along the road to freedom continues unchecked.” Seeing friends, family, pubs, gyms and shops all beckoned as planned.

But that bold statement was proof of the limits of having a hack premier, or more specifically newspaper-headlines-as-policy. The PM has for weeks told us that his roadmap is all about “data not dates”, yet here he was binding himself tightly to those dates. In his desperation to reassure the public, it felt like an overreach of the “nothing to see here” variety.

It took Whitty to reassert his role as Mr Caution, pointing out that the real policy was all about assessing the evidence after each stage of the roadmap. It was “far too early to look at the data” to understand if the return of schools had made a significant impact, he said (adding that “at the moment” there was nothing flashing red lights “beyond what you’d expect”).

Johnson’s journalistic past returned to haunt him again today as The Mirror dug up some remarks from his Spectator and Telegraph columns where he described NHS nurses as “starch bosomed” and joked about how to “handle” them. Given that the PM this Wednesday vowed to attack “casual, everyday sexism”, it was a reminder of just how long the charge sheet is against him.

On our latest Commons People podcast, Labour’s Jess Phillips was blunt about all this, saying “I can’t rehabilitate Boris Johnson’s sexism, I’m not even going to try, it’s a massive waste of my time…the best way to apologise, I say this to my children: sorry is just a word, changing your behaviour and making a change is the thing that will prove to me you’re actually sorry.”

Coming months will tell us whether there is real action on violence against women and girls, yet on the Covid pandemic itself it’s the PM’s inaction that has of course been his biggest weakness. A new Resolution Foundation report estimated that delaying the winter lockdown caused up to 27,000 extra deaths in England.

The think tank also reiterated its call for higher statutory sick pay, saying this was the most “glaring failure of economic policy” of the past year. Matt Hancock is understood to be in favour of jacking up rates, presumably because he can see that it would future-proof us against the next Covid wave, allowing more people to isolate without fear of losing income. But action, not words, is still missing.

Sadly, Johnson wasn’t asked at his press conference if he agreed with Dominic Cummings on the need for an “urgent” inquiry into the pandemic. The former aide tweeted he would tell the Commons health and science committees on June 26 “why things went so catastrophically wrong”. Even though Cummings’ target is bound to be “Whitehall”, that’s one date in the diary the PM may not relish.

Meanwhile, long after his departure from No.10, Cummings’ culture war on the media appears to be lingering like a bad stench in this government. Jacob Rees-Mogg disgraced himself by attacking my colleague Arj Singh in the Commons for committing the journalistic crime of reporting the words that came out of a minister’s mouth.

A clip of Raab’s words about the need to trade with countries that lacked “ECHR-level standards of human rights” was leaked to us because FCO staff felt they were a cause for concern. Crucially, his full remarks were not a repudiation of that quote, but a validation of it. “We don’t junk whole relationships because we’ve got issues,” he added. There was no “distortion”.

But exposing both his snobbery (he claimed The Times would never report what HuffPost UK did) and his ignorance (the Times used the exact same quote on its front page), Rees-Mogg showed that beneath all the fake politesse of his concocted young fogey persona there lurks a man scared to death of scrutiny.

In that, maybe he’s just following his boss’s lead. Yet we’ll probably wait in vain for Rees-Mogg to condemn a former journalist who literally made up a quote and was sacked from the Times as a result: Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson. There’s no distorting that fact, not the most salient one of all: the 125,000 deaths and counting from Covid on their watch. 

George Starling 2020-10-20
img
The essential ingredient, seaweed, is farmed in northern France and is said to grow faster than paper or starch
George Starling 2020-08-05
img
Comedy Central’s set its sights on one of the most raunchy and absurd cartoons to come out of the ‘90s
George Starling 2020-07-30
img
DNA tests are cheap and ubiquitous. For some donor-conceived people, they can unearth long-buried truths about their ancestry—and lead to unorthodox reunions.
George Starling 2019-10-09
img

Sextortion phishers are pivoting away from Bitcoin BTC to alternative cryptocurrencies to avoid being caught by email filters, ZDNet reports.

In particular, some sextortionists now rely on Litecoin, as major email providers automatically flag suspicious emails that feature Bitcoin wallet addresses.

“As this latest twist shows, threat actors can switch to the next crypto currency [sic] and attempt to iterate through all the scam’s previous versions,” said phishing analysts Cofense.

Litecoin is just sextortion flavor of the month

Sextortion phishing scams have plagued inboxes for well over a year.

They typically claim malware has infected recipient’s machines to record webcams and naughty browsing habits, demanding Bitcoin in exchange for not leaking that data to the world.

George Starling 2019-08-06

It’s perhaps easier than it ever has been to imagine the US presidency as a one-man ego trip leaving wanton destruction in its wake, so it’s to Metal Wolf Chaos’ credit that it still manages to make that concept seem faintly ridiculous.

A cult classic revived for modern platforms 15 years after its debut, Metal Wolf Chaos remains one of the most gloriously over-the-top games ever made.

Released exclusively in Japan for the original Xbox, Metal Wolf Chaos was developed by From Software many years before the studio found global acclaim with its brutal action games like Dark Souls, Bloodborne, and this year’s Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice.

The intricacies of Metal Wolf Chaos’ giant robot mechanics are a less pressing point of discussion than the fact that this is a game where you play the president of the United States and pilot a mech to fight back against a coup d’etat led by, of all people, the vice president.

Playing Metal Wolf Chaos is like watching The Room — you can’t quite believe how anybody managed to write these lines, much less speak them out loud in a recording studio.

“You’ve got a conference and dinner party at the Japanese embassy regarding wildlife protection,” says ever-present radio assistant Jody in an early exchange.