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James Woodson 2021-07-07
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It's a prequel to Snyder's Army of the Dead, so yes, there will also be zombies.
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0
James Woodson 2021-03-29
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The best way to know which aspects of the NFT craze will outlast this trendy boom is to look at the history of comparable assets; people have been making crypto collectibles for nearly seven years.
collect
0
James Woodson 2021-01-15
img
The Brooks Brothers riot in 2000 created a new blueprint for electoral disputes that deployed violence to intimidate officials into discarding votes.
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0
James Woodson 2020-08-21
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doordash delivery man

  • DoorDash announced Thursday that it will begin offering on-demand grocery deliveries to its users.
  • The move follows an expansion into stores like 7-Eleven, CVS, and Walgreens, as well as the launch of a "DashMart" virtual convenience store.
  • Food delivery services have seen a surge in popularity since the outbreak of COVID-19. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories

Doordash is coming for Instacart's bacon. The take-out delivery giant announced Thursday that it would be offering on-demand grocery delivery at chains throughout California and the Midwest.

Rather than providing a scheduled delivery window like competitor Instacart, the service will allow users to order groceries on-demand, with the goal of bringing veggies, cereal, or a rotisserie chicken to a user's door in under an hour. The grocery service is included on DashPass, an Amazon Prime-like subscription service that gives members unlimited free delivery and on orders over $12 for $9.99 a month.

The move follows other efforts by DoorDash to expand its business. Earlier this month, DoorDash announced that it would be expanding its offerings by delivering from convenience stores like Circle K, 7-Eleven, and Walgreens. The delivery giant even created a virtual convenience store of its own called DashMart.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the delivery business has seen a surge in interest. Online supermarket visits increased 162% in March, compared to the previous year, according to data from Namgoo.

DoorDash's competitor, Instacart, added 300,000 new workers in March to keep up with demand, according to the company.  And in June, Instacart received $225 million in financing that raised the company's valuation to $13.7 billion, according to an Instacart press release

DoorDash users can now order groceries on-demand from Smart&Final in California, and Meijer and Fresh Thyme in the midwest. It plans on expanding to Hy-Vee, Gristedes, and more chains in the coming weeks, extending its grocery delivery service to more than 75 million American shoppers.  

While this is the first time users can order groceries directly from the Doordash delivery app, this isn't the company's first partnership with supermarkets. DoorDash's white-label fulfillment service powers directly delivery for chains including Walmart, Hy-Vee, and Coborn's.

After a new round of funding in June, DoorDash reached a valuation of $16 billion, according to Axios. The company filed confidential initial public offering paperwork in February but has been delayed due to the novel coronavirus. 

SEE ALSO: DoorDash's head of engineering walks us through how it worked with $12 billion Cloudflare to keep its cloud infrastructure running as it dealt with millions of restaurant orders in the early days of the pandemic

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

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James Woodson 2021-06-08
img
The Guerrilla Collective held its Black Voices in Gaming 2021 event, and we've picked the best games we saw.
collect
0
James Woodson 2021-03-17
img
Paul Davison and Rohan Seth’s audio-only app is the tech crush of the pandemic. Now comes the hard part: hosting a global gabfest, without the toxicity.
collect
0
James Woodson 2020-09-24

Should we invite Amazon’s internet-connected cameras and voice assistants into our homes? That’s been a contentious topic for years — but today, Amazon effectively said “screw it” and announced an entire automated flying indoor robot security system.

Yes, that’s right: Amazon’s Ring division now has a camera that can theoretically go anywhere in your home, not just the direction you initially point it. Or, in Amazon’s words: An Innovative New Approach to Always Being Home.

Needless to say, the staff of The Verge has a few questions about that.

In no particular order and without naming names:

  • Can it go up and down stairs?
  • Why does it look like an air humidifier?
  • What’s battery life like?
  • Does the drone play slap bass?
  • How does it map...

Continue reading…

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0
James Woodson 2020-08-17
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Every Monday we’ll answer your questions on Covid-19 and health in a feature published online. You can submit a question here.

This week, HuffPost UK reader Simon asked: When will distancing be dropped completely?

Boris Johnson hinted in July that the UK could scrap the one-metre social distancing rule by November – sparking hope among those who’ve gone for months without being able to hug loved ones... or have sex.

“We hope by November at the earliest we can continue to make progress in our struggle against the virus,” said the prime minister. “It may conceivably be possible to move away from social distancing measures.”

As it stands, people in most parts of the UK are still meant to be social distancing when interacting with people outside of their household – this doesn’t apply to those who’ve formed a bubble with another household.

The question of when distanced will be dropped completely isn’t an easy one to answer, but when do experts think these measures may be able to (safely) end?

Submit a coronavirus health question to HuffPost UK.

Professor Rowland Kao, an expert in veterinary epidemiology and data science at the University of Edinburgh, says there’s “considerable difficulty” in making a prediction of how long social distancing measures will last.

Scrapping distancing depends on a combination of how much the 1m rule influences the R number, and whether or not other measures can be kept or put in place to keep the R number down, he says.

The R number – sometimes referred to as the R0 – is the “basic reproduction number”. It’s used to measure the transmission potential of a disease and represents the number of people one infected person will, on average, pass the virus on to. 

Another key factor is whether the number of new cases is low enough, so that any additional rise in cases due to the removal of social distancing can be contained by good test, track and trace – without putting too much stress on the NHS, says Prof Kao. For this, we need a track and trace system that works. Trials of a contact tracing app are currently under way.

During winter, it’s unlikely we’ll see social distancing ease as there’s a greater risk of transmission of respiratory illness (like flu and Covid-19) when people spend more time indoors. 

“As we are entering a period of increasing risks, we don’t yet have the relevant evidence to safely answer any of these questions,” he says, “especially as we attempt to manage this balance between Covid-19 controls and the necessary and important return to more normal working and living conditions.”

“Most importantly,” Prof Kao adds, “limiting the number of times local areas – or indeed, the entire country – must increase measures (such as entering lockdown) has to be a high priority.”

In a perfect world, experts would like to see no new active infections before scrapping social distancing in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. 

But we’re still averaging 1,000 daily lab-confirmed cases – and the actual figure is likely to be far higher. Professor David Hunter, an expert in epidemiology and medicine at University of Oxford, previously told HuffPost UK the mode of detection unearths one in five of the actual cases out there. So realistically, new infections may be nearer 5,000 cases a day. Quite far off the desired ‘zero’.

Professor John Edmunds, an expert from the Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, believes we’ll be under distancing restrictions until there’s high enough levels of immunity in the population for this to be unnecessary. 

Because incidence will (hopefully) be kept at a relatively low level in the future – due to local lockdown measures and track and trace – immunity generated by natural infection is “not likely to play a major role in achieving the high level of population immunity necessary to break chains of transmission,” he says. So, we need a vaccine to achieve this level of immunity. 

“That means we will remain with some social distance measures in place until a safe and effective vaccine is found, mass-produced and delivered to the population,” he says.

With this in mind, November seems like a long shot – especially as news on the UK’s vaccine efforts has gone particularly quiet. The latest is that the UK government has placed orders for six different experimental vaccines, however we don’t yet know if any of them actually work.

Some countries have managed to lift social distancing restrictions – however, they offer a cautionary tale that when such restrictions are eased, it’s not necessarily a done deal. 

At the start of June, New Zealand lifted all social distancing measures as the country reported zero new active cases of Covid-19, but it has since had to reinstate the measures due to an outbreak in Auckland. 

In the UK, the Bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey and the Isle of Man have scrapped social distancing. They eased such measures in June after a period of reporting no new infections. Residents were able to hug and kiss each other again, however travel and quarantine restrictions remain to stop infections from rising again if residents go on holiday. 

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James Woodson 2021-05-24
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Our favourite documentaries on Netflix...
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0
James Woodson 2021-02-26
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Amid COVID-19 and Brexit, the company's cloud division faces a fresh set of unique challenges.
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0
James Woodson 2020-09-07
img
The ScanWatch looks like a classy hybrid smartwatch, but it hides a list of health-monitoring features.
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0
James Woodson 2020-07-14
img
The Blue Oval has enlisted Sasquatch, HOSS and the GOAT to slay Jeep's Wrangler. Don't understand? Read on.
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0
James Woodson 2021-05-04
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As you'd expect on this particular date, there are some sweet Star Wars deals as well.
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James Woodson 2021-02-26
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You’re reading Sex Diaries, a HuffPost UK Personal series about how we are (or aren’t) having sex. To share your story, get in touch on [email protected]

Coming to terms with one’s sexuality is a lot like setting sail on a whim: the waters are treacherous, the depths are terrifying, and often the only support you have is a YouTube video you watched in preparation. 

As with most queer people, it was crystal clear that as I approached my mid-teens I wasn’t quite like the other kids my age. By no means was I alien or “other”, a mindset too often synonymous with queerness – instead, I looked at boys where my friends gazed after our female classmates. 

Resources for queer people were not as prominent as they are today. Social media was in its infancy and besides the obligatory “gay is okay” posters, there was no faculty support for emerging queer people. 

So with no specialised sex education to help me understand my inherent queerness, I turned to the medium which we all know should never be associated with learning about sex: porn.

In all its divine controversy, porn was my gateway into what it meant to be gay. For queer youth, porn is often the introduction to gay sex, since it’s shown on TV at a disproportionately lower rate. In 2021, we have fantastic shows like Sense 8, It’s A Sin, and soaps now show gay sex and relationships in a wholly positive light – but still, porn remains an introduction and exploration of sexuality.

Gay porn is, in my experience, just as problematic as the majority of straight porn, yet its audience is likely more vulnerable and curious about their emerging sexuality.

However, there’s the problem: gay porn is, in my experience, just as problematic as the majority of straight porn, yet its audience is likely more vulnerable and curious about their emerging sexuality. It’s estimated around 84% of queer youth are bullied in school, and 18% are forced into some form of sexual conduct without consent. 

I copied what I had seen in porn, and it went a lot deeper than merely mimicking techniques. What I saw in porn were damaging stereotypes, so naturally, I adopted these into my own sex life. Too often, there was fem-shaming, disturbing daddy/son scenes, and the idea of gay men actively pursuing straight men until they gave in – all terms which Pornhub report as among the most searched terms within the gay porn genre.

For adults more able to separate the entertainment from the problematic elements, porn can be a release and nothing more. But for the youth not able to differentiate between those aspects, porn forms the basis of their sexual education, even if they are not fully aware of it. That means it’s only now, in retrospect, that I realise the enormous effect porn had on my own sex life. 

I too perpetuated such negative queer stereotypes, often putting myself in precarious situations in a bid to be wanted. Being sexualised was synonymous with my worth. Too often did I believe I was a tool in my partner’s own gratification, and that my own pleasure was directly linked to their satisfaction.

In recent years, I have found myself being more selective with the porn I watch. And I’ve realised how much the world desperate needs ethically made, ethically planned, ethically executed gay porn. A quick google search confirms my suspicions; most videos labelled ‘ethical’ are the same scenes you see on almost every site. 

Opt for something without moral questionability, and instead choose something that depicts performers in an unproblematic light.

Because of this, I have found myself drawn to female-led sites like Bellesa, which aims to depict women as “subjects of pleasure” and not “objects of conquest.” Their emphasis is not on how much the man can subjugate the woman, but instead on the people, attraction, and just great sex.

At this point, I enjoy straight porn significantly more than its queer counterpart. And while that at first led to me questioning my sexuality, I realised (after an obligatory questioning of everything I had believed about myself) I shouldn’t overthink it. 

Was I somehow less gay? Well, I was still very much attracted to men sexually and romantically, so why limit myself when it comes to something as personal as pornography. It’s meant to be enjoyed, not overthought, so after finding ethically sourced porn, why look a gift horse (or porn star) in the mouth?

And even if I still identify, at the moment, as gay, in a fight for a decrease in labelling, why should I constrict myself to just another form of the binary? Porn should only be taken at face value, merely for entertainment purposes, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be selective with the videos you watch. Opt for something without moral questionability, and instead choose something that depicts performers in an unproblematic light. 

As an adult I have the agency and resources to explore my sexuality in safer environments, but for younger generations, porn is still very much an access point for sexual education. Just as sites dedicated to ethical depictions of women are thriving, we are in desperate need for queer porn that does not pump negativity into the minds of its audience. 

Kieran Galpin is a freelance journalist. Follow him on Twitter at @kierangalpin2

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

collect
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James Woodson 2020-08-23
img
Business as usual for the social networking site.
collect
0
James Woodson 2019-11-10
img

In this column, “Just putting this out there…,” we write about the odd ways we engage with tech and the unpopular opinions we form about it.

You can read the rest of the articles in this series here.

You can barely move for dark mode news stories these days.

And you, readers, should know better.

I actually really like dark mode.

Oh you poor, sweet, beautiful fool.

collect
0
James Woodson 2021-07-07
img
It's a prequel to Snyder's Army of the Dead, so yes, there will also be zombies.
James Woodson 2021-05-24
img
Our favourite documentaries on Netflix...
James Woodson 2021-03-29
img
The best way to know which aspects of the NFT craze will outlast this trendy boom is to look at the history of comparable assets; people have been making crypto collectibles for nearly seven years.
James Woodson 2021-02-26
img
Amid COVID-19 and Brexit, the company's cloud division faces a fresh set of unique challenges.
James Woodson 2021-01-15
img
The Brooks Brothers riot in 2000 created a new blueprint for electoral disputes that deployed violence to intimidate officials into discarding votes.
James Woodson 2020-09-07
img
The ScanWatch looks like a classy hybrid smartwatch, but it hides a list of health-monitoring features.
James Woodson 2020-08-21
img

doordash delivery man

  • DoorDash announced Thursday that it will begin offering on-demand grocery deliveries to its users.
  • The move follows an expansion into stores like 7-Eleven, CVS, and Walgreens, as well as the launch of a "DashMart" virtual convenience store.
  • Food delivery services have seen a surge in popularity since the outbreak of COVID-19. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories

Doordash is coming for Instacart's bacon. The take-out delivery giant announced Thursday that it would be offering on-demand grocery delivery at chains throughout California and the Midwest.

Rather than providing a scheduled delivery window like competitor Instacart, the service will allow users to order groceries on-demand, with the goal of bringing veggies, cereal, or a rotisserie chicken to a user's door in under an hour. The grocery service is included on DashPass, an Amazon Prime-like subscription service that gives members unlimited free delivery and on orders over $12 for $9.99 a month.

The move follows other efforts by DoorDash to expand its business. Earlier this month, DoorDash announced that it would be expanding its offerings by delivering from convenience stores like Circle K, 7-Eleven, and Walgreens. The delivery giant even created a virtual convenience store of its own called DashMart.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the delivery business has seen a surge in interest. Online supermarket visits increased 162% in March, compared to the previous year, according to data from Namgoo.

DoorDash's competitor, Instacart, added 300,000 new workers in March to keep up with demand, according to the company.  And in June, Instacart received $225 million in financing that raised the company's valuation to $13.7 billion, according to an Instacart press release

DoorDash users can now order groceries on-demand from Smart&Final in California, and Meijer and Fresh Thyme in the midwest. It plans on expanding to Hy-Vee, Gristedes, and more chains in the coming weeks, extending its grocery delivery service to more than 75 million American shoppers.  

While this is the first time users can order groceries directly from the Doordash delivery app, this isn't the company's first partnership with supermarkets. DoorDash's white-label fulfillment service powers directly delivery for chains including Walmart, Hy-Vee, and Coborn's.

After a new round of funding in June, DoorDash reached a valuation of $16 billion, according to Axios. The company filed confidential initial public offering paperwork in February but has been delayed due to the novel coronavirus. 

SEE ALSO: DoorDash's head of engineering walks us through how it worked with $12 billion Cloudflare to keep its cloud infrastructure running as it dealt with millions of restaurant orders in the early days of the pandemic

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

James Woodson 2020-07-14
img
The Blue Oval has enlisted Sasquatch, HOSS and the GOAT to slay Jeep's Wrangler. Don't understand? Read on.
James Woodson 2021-06-08
img
The Guerrilla Collective held its Black Voices in Gaming 2021 event, and we've picked the best games we saw.
James Woodson 2021-05-04
img
As you'd expect on this particular date, there are some sweet Star Wars deals as well.
James Woodson 2021-03-17
img
Paul Davison and Rohan Seth’s audio-only app is the tech crush of the pandemic. Now comes the hard part: hosting a global gabfest, without the toxicity.
James Woodson 2021-02-26
img

You’re reading Sex Diaries, a HuffPost UK Personal series about how we are (or aren’t) having sex. To share your story, get in touch on [email protected]

Coming to terms with one’s sexuality is a lot like setting sail on a whim: the waters are treacherous, the depths are terrifying, and often the only support you have is a YouTube video you watched in preparation. 

As with most queer people, it was crystal clear that as I approached my mid-teens I wasn’t quite like the other kids my age. By no means was I alien or “other”, a mindset too often synonymous with queerness – instead, I looked at boys where my friends gazed after our female classmates. 

Resources for queer people were not as prominent as they are today. Social media was in its infancy and besides the obligatory “gay is okay” posters, there was no faculty support for emerging queer people. 

So with no specialised sex education to help me understand my inherent queerness, I turned to the medium which we all know should never be associated with learning about sex: porn.

In all its divine controversy, porn was my gateway into what it meant to be gay. For queer youth, porn is often the introduction to gay sex, since it’s shown on TV at a disproportionately lower rate. In 2021, we have fantastic shows like Sense 8, It’s A Sin, and soaps now show gay sex and relationships in a wholly positive light – but still, porn remains an introduction and exploration of sexuality.

Gay porn is, in my experience, just as problematic as the majority of straight porn, yet its audience is likely more vulnerable and curious about their emerging sexuality.

However, there’s the problem: gay porn is, in my experience, just as problematic as the majority of straight porn, yet its audience is likely more vulnerable and curious about their emerging sexuality. It’s estimated around 84% of queer youth are bullied in school, and 18% are forced into some form of sexual conduct without consent. 

I copied what I had seen in porn, and it went a lot deeper than merely mimicking techniques. What I saw in porn were damaging stereotypes, so naturally, I adopted these into my own sex life. Too often, there was fem-shaming, disturbing daddy/son scenes, and the idea of gay men actively pursuing straight men until they gave in – all terms which Pornhub report as among the most searched terms within the gay porn genre.

For adults more able to separate the entertainment from the problematic elements, porn can be a release and nothing more. But for the youth not able to differentiate between those aspects, porn forms the basis of their sexual education, even if they are not fully aware of it. That means it’s only now, in retrospect, that I realise the enormous effect porn had on my own sex life. 

I too perpetuated such negative queer stereotypes, often putting myself in precarious situations in a bid to be wanted. Being sexualised was synonymous with my worth. Too often did I believe I was a tool in my partner’s own gratification, and that my own pleasure was directly linked to their satisfaction.

In recent years, I have found myself being more selective with the porn I watch. And I’ve realised how much the world desperate needs ethically made, ethically planned, ethically executed gay porn. A quick google search confirms my suspicions; most videos labelled ‘ethical’ are the same scenes you see on almost every site. 

Opt for something without moral questionability, and instead choose something that depicts performers in an unproblematic light.

Because of this, I have found myself drawn to female-led sites like Bellesa, which aims to depict women as “subjects of pleasure” and not “objects of conquest.” Their emphasis is not on how much the man can subjugate the woman, but instead on the people, attraction, and just great sex.

At this point, I enjoy straight porn significantly more than its queer counterpart. And while that at first led to me questioning my sexuality, I realised (after an obligatory questioning of everything I had believed about myself) I shouldn’t overthink it. 

Was I somehow less gay? Well, I was still very much attracted to men sexually and romantically, so why limit myself when it comes to something as personal as pornography. It’s meant to be enjoyed, not overthought, so after finding ethically sourced porn, why look a gift horse (or porn star) in the mouth?

And even if I still identify, at the moment, as gay, in a fight for a decrease in labelling, why should I constrict myself to just another form of the binary? Porn should only be taken at face value, merely for entertainment purposes, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be selective with the videos you watch. Opt for something without moral questionability, and instead choose something that depicts performers in an unproblematic light. 

As an adult I have the agency and resources to explore my sexuality in safer environments, but for younger generations, porn is still very much an access point for sexual education. Just as sites dedicated to ethical depictions of women are thriving, we are in desperate need for queer porn that does not pump negativity into the minds of its audience. 

Kieran Galpin is a freelance journalist. Follow him on Twitter at @kierangalpin2

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

James Woodson 2020-09-24

Should we invite Amazon’s internet-connected cameras and voice assistants into our homes? That’s been a contentious topic for years — but today, Amazon effectively said “screw it” and announced an entire automated flying indoor robot security system.

Yes, that’s right: Amazon’s Ring division now has a camera that can theoretically go anywhere in your home, not just the direction you initially point it. Or, in Amazon’s words: An Innovative New Approach to Always Being Home.

Needless to say, the staff of The Verge has a few questions about that.

In no particular order and without naming names:

  • Can it go up and down stairs?
  • Why does it look like an air humidifier?
  • What’s battery life like?
  • Does the drone play slap bass?
  • How does it map...

Continue reading…

James Woodson 2020-08-23
img
Business as usual for the social networking site.
James Woodson 2020-08-17
img

Every Monday we’ll answer your questions on Covid-19 and health in a feature published online. You can submit a question here.

This week, HuffPost UK reader Simon asked: When will distancing be dropped completely?

Boris Johnson hinted in July that the UK could scrap the one-metre social distancing rule by November – sparking hope among those who’ve gone for months without being able to hug loved ones... or have sex.

“We hope by November at the earliest we can continue to make progress in our struggle against the virus,” said the prime minister. “It may conceivably be possible to move away from social distancing measures.”

As it stands, people in most parts of the UK are still meant to be social distancing when interacting with people outside of their household – this doesn’t apply to those who’ve formed a bubble with another household.

The question of when distanced will be dropped completely isn’t an easy one to answer, but when do experts think these measures may be able to (safely) end?

Submit a coronavirus health question to HuffPost UK.

Professor Rowland Kao, an expert in veterinary epidemiology and data science at the University of Edinburgh, says there’s “considerable difficulty” in making a prediction of how long social distancing measures will last.

Scrapping distancing depends on a combination of how much the 1m rule influences the R number, and whether or not other measures can be kept or put in place to keep the R number down, he says.

The R number – sometimes referred to as the R0 – is the “basic reproduction number”. It’s used to measure the transmission potential of a disease and represents the number of people one infected person will, on average, pass the virus on to. 

Another key factor is whether the number of new cases is low enough, so that any additional rise in cases due to the removal of social distancing can be contained by good test, track and trace – without putting too much stress on the NHS, says Prof Kao. For this, we need a track and trace system that works. Trials of a contact tracing app are currently under way.

During winter, it’s unlikely we’ll see social distancing ease as there’s a greater risk of transmission of respiratory illness (like flu and Covid-19) when people spend more time indoors. 

“As we are entering a period of increasing risks, we don’t yet have the relevant evidence to safely answer any of these questions,” he says, “especially as we attempt to manage this balance between Covid-19 controls and the necessary and important return to more normal working and living conditions.”

“Most importantly,” Prof Kao adds, “limiting the number of times local areas – or indeed, the entire country – must increase measures (such as entering lockdown) has to be a high priority.”

In a perfect world, experts would like to see no new active infections before scrapping social distancing in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. 

But we’re still averaging 1,000 daily lab-confirmed cases – and the actual figure is likely to be far higher. Professor David Hunter, an expert in epidemiology and medicine at University of Oxford, previously told HuffPost UK the mode of detection unearths one in five of the actual cases out there. So realistically, new infections may be nearer 5,000 cases a day. Quite far off the desired ‘zero’.

Professor John Edmunds, an expert from the Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, believes we’ll be under distancing restrictions until there’s high enough levels of immunity in the population for this to be unnecessary. 

Because incidence will (hopefully) be kept at a relatively low level in the future – due to local lockdown measures and track and trace – immunity generated by natural infection is “not likely to play a major role in achieving the high level of population immunity necessary to break chains of transmission,” he says. So, we need a vaccine to achieve this level of immunity. 

“That means we will remain with some social distance measures in place until a safe and effective vaccine is found, mass-produced and delivered to the population,” he says.

With this in mind, November seems like a long shot – especially as news on the UK’s vaccine efforts has gone particularly quiet. The latest is that the UK government has placed orders for six different experimental vaccines, however we don’t yet know if any of them actually work.

Some countries have managed to lift social distancing restrictions – however, they offer a cautionary tale that when such restrictions are eased, it’s not necessarily a done deal. 

At the start of June, New Zealand lifted all social distancing measures as the country reported zero new active cases of Covid-19, but it has since had to reinstate the measures due to an outbreak in Auckland. 

In the UK, the Bailiwicks of Jersey and Guernsey and the Isle of Man have scrapped social distancing. They eased such measures in June after a period of reporting no new infections. Residents were able to hug and kiss each other again, however travel and quarantine restrictions remain to stop infections from rising again if residents go on holiday. 

James Woodson 2019-11-10
img

In this column, “Just putting this out there…,” we write about the odd ways we engage with tech and the unpopular opinions we form about it.

You can read the rest of the articles in this series here.

You can barely move for dark mode news stories these days.

And you, readers, should know better.

I actually really like dark mode.

Oh you poor, sweet, beautiful fool.