logo
logo
twitter facebook facebook
Jason Vest
twitter facebook facebook
Followers 88 Following 71
Jason Vest 2021-07-23
img
The fast galley probably sank during an earthquake in the 100s BCE.
collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-03-18
img

If you haven’t worn a bra in months or you enjoy really long baths to escape from your family, you’re in good company.

People have been anonymously sharing their lockdown secrets on postcards as part of an arts project launched by Eleanor Tattersfield, the founder of Marby and Elm print workshop and stationery store in London’s Exmouth Market. 

The concept is simple: order a free postcard online and Tattersfield will send you a stamped and addressed postcard “for you to unburden yourself of your lockdown secret”. 

She’s sent out 500 postcards to date, and has received 275 replies, ranging from the oh-so-relatable to the fantastically eyebrow-raising. 

“I hide bars of chocolate in an old Oxo tin,” one postcard reads. “I am having passionate secret sex with another man’s wife and I love it,” another adds. 

Tattersfield shares the postcards on Instagram and says the most prominent themes are food, sex, masturbation, loneliness, breaking the rules, love and the love of lockdown.

“I cannot express the joy and excitement I feel opening my shop in the morning and seeing the pile of previously undisclosed secrets on the doormat,” she says. “To think I get to be the first to read these little pieces of someone’s soul is an immeasurable privilege.

“Their wit, sincerity, creativity and diversity are completely compelling.”

Tattersfield came up with the idea after listening to The Apology Line podcast, which tells the story of an answer machine confession line from the 1980s, where people left weird and bizarre messages.

Her shop has been closed in lockdown and the project enabled her to connect with customers, new and old. The collection presents “a portrait of our extraordinary times”, and she hopes to turn the postcards into a book. 

“Many people have said they felt a sense of relief writing out their secret and sending it off, out in the ether,” she says. 

“Ultimately, this project shows that age old adage that we’re not alone in our secrets/fears/dilemmas/loneliness and seeing and hearing others are going through the same binds us, and helps us through this period of uncertainty.”

Check out some of the postcards below or follow Marby and Elm on Instagram to see more of the project. 

collect
0
Jason Vest 2020-12-25
img

Over-promised, under-delivered, and plays like an alpha – try again later

The RPG  Greetings, traveller, and welcome back to The Register Plays Games, our monthly gaming column. Merry Christmas? Maybe not if you found Cyberpunk 2077 in your stocking.

collect
0
Jason Vest 2020-08-19
img

Our robot colleague Satoshi Nakaboto writes about Bitcoin every fucking day. Welcome to another edition of Bitcoin Today, where I, Satoshi Nakaboto, tell you what’s been going on with Bitcoin in the past 24 hours. As Descartes used to say: Fight the power! Bitcoin price We closed the day, August 18 2020, at a price of $11,991. That’s a notable 2.12 percent decline in 24 hours, or -$260.67. It was the lowest closing price in one day. We’re still 40 percent below Bitcoin‘s all-time high of $20,089 (December 17 2017). Bitcoin market cap Bitcoin‘s market cap ended the day at…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Bitcoin
collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-07-19
After more than 100 years of being sold alongside sporting goods competitors, and living in the shadows of retail giants like Dick's and the fallen Modell's, the Super Bowl's only football manufacturer is ready to claim its own offline territory. Top line Wilson Sporting Goods opened its first retail store on July 15 in Chicago,...
collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-03-16
From Mank to Nomadland, here's a handy guide to watching some of the best movies of the past year.
collect
0
Jason Vest 2020-10-07
img

Resident Evil is getting its hundredth film adaptation (or at least that’s what it feels like) and this time they’re adapting the game’s story, for better or for worse. Specifically, they’ll apparently be adapting the first two games, bringing some classic characters to the screen — properly this time. Kaya Scodelario, Hannah John-Kamen and Robbie Amell will star in #ResidentEvil, the official origin story for the movie franchise based on the horror video games. https://t.co/mQy42hUuJA pic.twitter.com/OeElu1XhtL — The Hollywood Reporter (@THR) October 6, 2020 The new movie is set in 1998 in Raccoon City and the Arklay Mountains. Franchise producer Robert…

This story continues at The Next Web
collect
0
Jason Vest 2020-08-14
img
The device, called Snatcher, could help robots quickly retrieve objects without getting too close to them
collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-03-25
img
This week's rundown includes how ESPN quadrupled its TikTok follower count in the past year by diving into metrics and monitoring trends.
collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-03-05
img
The Black community has long faced systemic racism and painful mistreatment at the hands of doctors and the American medical system.
collect
0
Jason Vest 2020-09-27
img
Woman relaxing in armchair listening to music with headphones and smart phone

“What would you do if you knew you would never get married?” my therapist asked me.

“I’d probably kill myself,” I blurted, and was immediately shocked at both what I’d said and at its truthfulness. An unpartnered life seemed at that moment to be not worth living, even though I was in my mid-40s and had spent more of my adulthood single than not.

I’d started seeing my therapist again because my boyfriend of three years had suddenly ghosted me. After a highly emotional discussion about our future together, he stopped returning my phone calls or texts. I’d hoped we were headed toward making our connection more permanent, at least by moving in together. 

As I desperately tried to figure out what was going on and save our relationship with tactics culled from Googling mental health and dating websites, I was barely sleeping and spent my waking hours in a kind of feral panic. 

Unable to eat much, I lost 14 pounds in six weeks. I didn’t want to believe my ex could consciously treat me this way, so I decided he must have been having some sort of breakdown. I didn’t recognize that I was on my way to having one myself.

I’d always assumed I would get married eventually. Despite my long identification as a feminist, I thought marriage — the right marriage — would make life easier, an idea I picked up on from my mother. She was expecting to be a good Catholic wife and mother who’d stay at home with the kids. Unfortunately, she married her alcoholic high school sweetheart — charming, smart and handsome, but an undependable mess — and instead she ended up divorced and responsible for supporting two small children in the early 1970s. 

Back then divorce was not as common as it is now, especially in our well-to-do Chicago suburb. I was acutely aware that my mom was the only divorcée among my friends’ parents and that we were the only ones who lived in a small apartment rather than a big house from which the dad set off to work every day. 

While we never wanted for food or other basics, money was tight. An undercurrent of anxiety colored my childhood as my mom went out on dates and pined after a wealthy, emotionally unavailable boyfriend who took us out for ice cream in his Alfa Romeo and for trips on his boat. 

Once, going through her purse for some reason, I found a scrap of paper on which she’d doodled her married name with the boyfriend. She grabbed it away, angry and humiliated. 

“Don’t get married too young, but don’t wait too long — the men will be picked over,” she once told me. 

There’s no doubt in my mind that I would be living a much more diminished life ... if his actions, as cruel as they were, hadn’t forced me to wake up.

My boyfriend’s abrupt exit and my subsequent near-breakdown forced me to do some soul-searching. I had to grapple with the increasingly likely possibility that I would not, in fact, ever get married, or at least not anytime soon. So what did I want my life to look like instead?

I was ashamed that I couldn’t even answer the question. I came to realize I had been using the goal of a partnership as a way to avoid taking responsibility for my own life.

I’d always been beset by feelings of anxiety and inadequacy at my jobs and in my writing. By hitching my cart to a man’s, I wouldn’t have to fully face them. I wouldn’t have to take as many risks, or the risks would be lessened because I’d be in a place of greater economic and emotional security. Or so I thought.

So I started asking myself what I wanted to do. Immediately, I knew I wanted to travel more. For my first post-breakup trip, I went to Tulum, Mexico, by myself. It was a little weird to be on my own in that extremely romantic place, but I truly relaxed, lying for hours in a hammock or on a lounge chair on the beach while waiters brought me margaritas. 

When I showed up at the hot restaurant where advance reservations were a must, I scored a seat at the bar because I was on my own. I was often the only single traveler on snorkeling trips and other outings, but no one seemed to think it was that odd, or if they did, they were impressed rather than pitying. 

Over the next few years, I went to Puerto Rico, Portugal, Italy, Spain, Turkey and all over the U.S. — almost always by myself.

In the meantime, Donald Trump was running for president, and his pussy-grabbing comments, allegations of sexual assault and history of insulting women were in the news every day. At the same time, the Me Too movement was gaining steam.

I became increasingly angry at the way too many men failed to show empathy for the harassment and unequal treatment women suffered, excusing Trump’s behavior and saying the Me Too movement had gone too far, just as powerful men started to be held accountable. I was horrified at how many white women voted for Trump, a candidate who represented a gendered status quo that I naively thought had been crumbling.

Suddenly, remaining single didn’t seem like bad luck or a personal failing ― it seemed like a valid choice and even an enviable status, something that more than one married person at my 30th high school reunion made sure to tell me. 

While a committed relationship can undoubtedly enrich the lives of the people in it, as more friends divorced and broke up, I realized that all too often it requires sacrifices I wasn’t sure I was willing to make. And even when it’s good, the going can be just as tough as single life. 

“You seem to think marriage makes everything great,” a friend who is in probably the best partnership I know of said to me at one point. “It doesn’t.” 

So I stopped feeling ashamed and embarrassed about being one of the only older women in my large extended family who had never gotten married or had a kid. I stopped feeling helpless and alone when something went wrong with my condo or my car. I earned a master’s degree and graduated with a 4.0 GPA. And when I got laid off from my job, I had the confidence to go freelance so I could start living the life of greater freedom that I’d dreamed of — even knowing I’d still face those old feelings of fear and anxiety. 

A love and dating coach whom I followed for a while in my doomed effort to get my ex back often counseled her heartbroken followers, “Someday you’ll be grateful to your ex for dumping you.” 

There’s no doubt in my mind that I would be living a much more diminished life— and probably making the same mistakes with men over and over again, a dating version of Groundhog Day ― if his actions, as cruel as they were, hadn’t forced me to wake up. 

One could argue I’ve gone too far the other way. I have pretty high standards for how I spend my limited free time, and, for the most part, the men I’ve met haven’t cleared the bar. Family members still occasionally make cat lady jokes. But I lived the first half of my life trying to fit myself into a mould to attract and keep a man. I think I’ll spend the second half trying to live the life that pleases me. 

If that brings me a loving partnership, I’ll be very happy. But I’ll still be very happy if it doesn’t.

This article first appeared on HuffPost Personal

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

collect
0
Jason Vest 2019-11-10
img

To mark its publication, he devised this entertaining accompanying quiz.

Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz have a lot in common.

Most of all, each had the honor of bringing calculus into the world.

(a) Engage in civil debate with my fellow Wikipedia editors

(b) Write long, password-protected blog posts about my intricate conspiracy theories

(c) Go on social media; read the news; maybe watch some YouTube

collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-03-22
img
Biden didn’t campaign on getting tough against Big Tech, but his early actions are speaking louder than his words. The White House confirmed its intentions to nominate Lina Khan to the FTC Monday, sending a clear signal that his administration will break from the Silicon Valley-friendly precedents of the Obama era. Politico first reported Biden’s […]
collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-01-21
img
Facing stiff competition and heavy losses, LG has had a mixed track record in the phone business.
collect
0
Jason Vest 2020-08-19
img
The world may suck, but novels can navigate similar situations and give you a measure of hope.
collect
0
Jason Vest 2019-11-04
img

A company that runs several sites featuring camworkers left the back-end database unprotected, allowing the data of hundreds of thousands – if not millions – of customers and sex workers to be exposed.

TechCrunch reports that researchers at cybersecurity firm Condition:Black uncovered that VTS Media, a Barcelona-based company, left its database exposed.

VTS runs “camgirl” networks like webcampornoxxx.net, placercams.com, and amateru.rv, which is among the most popular in Spain, according to Alexa.

TechCrunch found that most of the sites’ users live in Europe, but the sites also have US traffic.

This exposed database, which was not password protected, reportedly held a few months of site activity logs, including usernames and IP addresses, and records of when the users were active on the sites.

The database also held chat messages between users and showed what videos customers were viewing.

collect
0
Jason Vest 2021-07-23
img
The fast galley probably sank during an earthquake in the 100s BCE.
Jason Vest 2021-03-25
img
This week's rundown includes how ESPN quadrupled its TikTok follower count in the past year by diving into metrics and monitoring trends.
Jason Vest 2021-03-18
img

If you haven’t worn a bra in months or you enjoy really long baths to escape from your family, you’re in good company.

People have been anonymously sharing their lockdown secrets on postcards as part of an arts project launched by Eleanor Tattersfield, the founder of Marby and Elm print workshop and stationery store in London’s Exmouth Market. 

The concept is simple: order a free postcard online and Tattersfield will send you a stamped and addressed postcard “for you to unburden yourself of your lockdown secret”. 

She’s sent out 500 postcards to date, and has received 275 replies, ranging from the oh-so-relatable to the fantastically eyebrow-raising. 

“I hide bars of chocolate in an old Oxo tin,” one postcard reads. “I am having passionate secret sex with another man’s wife and I love it,” another adds. 

Tattersfield shares the postcards on Instagram and says the most prominent themes are food, sex, masturbation, loneliness, breaking the rules, love and the love of lockdown.

“I cannot express the joy and excitement I feel opening my shop in the morning and seeing the pile of previously undisclosed secrets on the doormat,” she says. “To think I get to be the first to read these little pieces of someone’s soul is an immeasurable privilege.

“Their wit, sincerity, creativity and diversity are completely compelling.”

Tattersfield came up with the idea after listening to The Apology Line podcast, which tells the story of an answer machine confession line from the 1980s, where people left weird and bizarre messages.

Her shop has been closed in lockdown and the project enabled her to connect with customers, new and old. The collection presents “a portrait of our extraordinary times”, and she hopes to turn the postcards into a book. 

“Many people have said they felt a sense of relief writing out their secret and sending it off, out in the ether,” she says. 

“Ultimately, this project shows that age old adage that we’re not alone in our secrets/fears/dilemmas/loneliness and seeing and hearing others are going through the same binds us, and helps us through this period of uncertainty.”

Check out some of the postcards below or follow Marby and Elm on Instagram to see more of the project. 

Jason Vest 2021-03-05
img
The Black community has long faced systemic racism and painful mistreatment at the hands of doctors and the American medical system.
Jason Vest 2020-12-25
img

Over-promised, under-delivered, and plays like an alpha – try again later

The RPG  Greetings, traveller, and welcome back to The Register Plays Games, our monthly gaming column. Merry Christmas? Maybe not if you found Cyberpunk 2077 in your stocking.

Jason Vest 2020-09-27
img
Woman relaxing in armchair listening to music with headphones and smart phone

“What would you do if you knew you would never get married?” my therapist asked me.

“I’d probably kill myself,” I blurted, and was immediately shocked at both what I’d said and at its truthfulness. An unpartnered life seemed at that moment to be not worth living, even though I was in my mid-40s and had spent more of my adulthood single than not.

I’d started seeing my therapist again because my boyfriend of three years had suddenly ghosted me. After a highly emotional discussion about our future together, he stopped returning my phone calls or texts. I’d hoped we were headed toward making our connection more permanent, at least by moving in together. 

As I desperately tried to figure out what was going on and save our relationship with tactics culled from Googling mental health and dating websites, I was barely sleeping and spent my waking hours in a kind of feral panic. 

Unable to eat much, I lost 14 pounds in six weeks. I didn’t want to believe my ex could consciously treat me this way, so I decided he must have been having some sort of breakdown. I didn’t recognize that I was on my way to having one myself.

I’d always assumed I would get married eventually. Despite my long identification as a feminist, I thought marriage — the right marriage — would make life easier, an idea I picked up on from my mother. She was expecting to be a good Catholic wife and mother who’d stay at home with the kids. Unfortunately, she married her alcoholic high school sweetheart — charming, smart and handsome, but an undependable mess — and instead she ended up divorced and responsible for supporting two small children in the early 1970s. 

Back then divorce was not as common as it is now, especially in our well-to-do Chicago suburb. I was acutely aware that my mom was the only divorcée among my friends’ parents and that we were the only ones who lived in a small apartment rather than a big house from which the dad set off to work every day. 

While we never wanted for food or other basics, money was tight. An undercurrent of anxiety colored my childhood as my mom went out on dates and pined after a wealthy, emotionally unavailable boyfriend who took us out for ice cream in his Alfa Romeo and for trips on his boat. 

Once, going through her purse for some reason, I found a scrap of paper on which she’d doodled her married name with the boyfriend. She grabbed it away, angry and humiliated. 

“Don’t get married too young, but don’t wait too long — the men will be picked over,” she once told me. 

There’s no doubt in my mind that I would be living a much more diminished life ... if his actions, as cruel as they were, hadn’t forced me to wake up.

My boyfriend’s abrupt exit and my subsequent near-breakdown forced me to do some soul-searching. I had to grapple with the increasingly likely possibility that I would not, in fact, ever get married, or at least not anytime soon. So what did I want my life to look like instead?

I was ashamed that I couldn’t even answer the question. I came to realize I had been using the goal of a partnership as a way to avoid taking responsibility for my own life.

I’d always been beset by feelings of anxiety and inadequacy at my jobs and in my writing. By hitching my cart to a man’s, I wouldn’t have to fully face them. I wouldn’t have to take as many risks, or the risks would be lessened because I’d be in a place of greater economic and emotional security. Or so I thought.

So I started asking myself what I wanted to do. Immediately, I knew I wanted to travel more. For my first post-breakup trip, I went to Tulum, Mexico, by myself. It was a little weird to be on my own in that extremely romantic place, but I truly relaxed, lying for hours in a hammock or on a lounge chair on the beach while waiters brought me margaritas. 

When I showed up at the hot restaurant where advance reservations were a must, I scored a seat at the bar because I was on my own. I was often the only single traveler on snorkeling trips and other outings, but no one seemed to think it was that odd, or if they did, they were impressed rather than pitying. 

Over the next few years, I went to Puerto Rico, Portugal, Italy, Spain, Turkey and all over the U.S. — almost always by myself.

In the meantime, Donald Trump was running for president, and his pussy-grabbing comments, allegations of sexual assault and history of insulting women were in the news every day. At the same time, the Me Too movement was gaining steam.

I became increasingly angry at the way too many men failed to show empathy for the harassment and unequal treatment women suffered, excusing Trump’s behavior and saying the Me Too movement had gone too far, just as powerful men started to be held accountable. I was horrified at how many white women voted for Trump, a candidate who represented a gendered status quo that I naively thought had been crumbling.

Suddenly, remaining single didn’t seem like bad luck or a personal failing ― it seemed like a valid choice and even an enviable status, something that more than one married person at my 30th high school reunion made sure to tell me. 

While a committed relationship can undoubtedly enrich the lives of the people in it, as more friends divorced and broke up, I realized that all too often it requires sacrifices I wasn’t sure I was willing to make. And even when it’s good, the going can be just as tough as single life. 

“You seem to think marriage makes everything great,” a friend who is in probably the best partnership I know of said to me at one point. “It doesn’t.” 

So I stopped feeling ashamed and embarrassed about being one of the only older women in my large extended family who had never gotten married or had a kid. I stopped feeling helpless and alone when something went wrong with my condo or my car. I earned a master’s degree and graduated with a 4.0 GPA. And when I got laid off from my job, I had the confidence to go freelance so I could start living the life of greater freedom that I’d dreamed of — even knowing I’d still face those old feelings of fear and anxiety. 

A love and dating coach whom I followed for a while in my doomed effort to get my ex back often counseled her heartbroken followers, “Someday you’ll be grateful to your ex for dumping you.” 

There’s no doubt in my mind that I would be living a much more diminished life— and probably making the same mistakes with men over and over again, a dating version of Groundhog Day ― if his actions, as cruel as they were, hadn’t forced me to wake up. 

One could argue I’ve gone too far the other way. I have pretty high standards for how I spend my limited free time, and, for the most part, the men I’ve met haven’t cleared the bar. Family members still occasionally make cat lady jokes. But I lived the first half of my life trying to fit myself into a mould to attract and keep a man. I think I’ll spend the second half trying to live the life that pleases me. 

If that brings me a loving partnership, I’ll be very happy. But I’ll still be very happy if it doesn’t.

This article first appeared on HuffPost Personal

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

Jason Vest 2020-08-19
img

Our robot colleague Satoshi Nakaboto writes about Bitcoin every fucking day. Welcome to another edition of Bitcoin Today, where I, Satoshi Nakaboto, tell you what’s been going on with Bitcoin in the past 24 hours. As Descartes used to say: Fight the power! Bitcoin price We closed the day, August 18 2020, at a price of $11,991. That’s a notable 2.12 percent decline in 24 hours, or -$260.67. It was the lowest closing price in one day. We’re still 40 percent below Bitcoin‘s all-time high of $20,089 (December 17 2017). Bitcoin market cap Bitcoin‘s market cap ended the day at…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Bitcoin
Jason Vest 2019-11-10
img

To mark its publication, he devised this entertaining accompanying quiz.

Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz have a lot in common.

Most of all, each had the honor of bringing calculus into the world.

(a) Engage in civil debate with my fellow Wikipedia editors

(b) Write long, password-protected blog posts about my intricate conspiracy theories

(c) Go on social media; read the news; maybe watch some YouTube

Jason Vest 2021-07-19
After more than 100 years of being sold alongside sporting goods competitors, and living in the shadows of retail giants like Dick's and the fallen Modell's, the Super Bowl's only football manufacturer is ready to claim its own offline territory. Top line Wilson Sporting Goods opened its first retail store on July 15 in Chicago,...
Jason Vest 2021-03-22
img
Biden didn’t campaign on getting tough against Big Tech, but his early actions are speaking louder than his words. The White House confirmed its intentions to nominate Lina Khan to the FTC Monday, sending a clear signal that his administration will break from the Silicon Valley-friendly precedents of the Obama era. Politico first reported Biden’s […]
Jason Vest 2021-03-16
From Mank to Nomadland, here's a handy guide to watching some of the best movies of the past year.
Jason Vest 2021-01-21
img
Facing stiff competition and heavy losses, LG has had a mixed track record in the phone business.
Jason Vest 2020-10-07
img

Resident Evil is getting its hundredth film adaptation (or at least that’s what it feels like) and this time they’re adapting the game’s story, for better or for worse. Specifically, they’ll apparently be adapting the first two games, bringing some classic characters to the screen — properly this time. Kaya Scodelario, Hannah John-Kamen and Robbie Amell will star in #ResidentEvil, the official origin story for the movie franchise based on the horror video games. https://t.co/mQy42hUuJA pic.twitter.com/OeElu1XhtL — The Hollywood Reporter (@THR) October 6, 2020 The new movie is set in 1998 in Raccoon City and the Arklay Mountains. Franchise producer Robert…

This story continues at The Next Web
Jason Vest 2020-08-19
img
The world may suck, but novels can navigate similar situations and give you a measure of hope.
Jason Vest 2020-08-14
img
The device, called Snatcher, could help robots quickly retrieve objects without getting too close to them
Jason Vest 2019-11-04
img

A company that runs several sites featuring camworkers left the back-end database unprotected, allowing the data of hundreds of thousands – if not millions – of customers and sex workers to be exposed.

TechCrunch reports that researchers at cybersecurity firm Condition:Black uncovered that VTS Media, a Barcelona-based company, left its database exposed.

VTS runs “camgirl” networks like webcampornoxxx.net, placercams.com, and amateru.rv, which is among the most popular in Spain, according to Alexa.

TechCrunch found that most of the sites’ users live in Europe, but the sites also have US traffic.

This exposed database, which was not password protected, reportedly held a few months of site activity logs, including usernames and IP addresses, and records of when the users were active on the sites.

The database also held chat messages between users and showed what videos customers were viewing.