logo
logo
twitter facebook facebook
Jeff Smith
twitter facebook facebook
Followers 72 Following 49
Jeff Smith 2021-07-27
img

Fans are crestfallen that Simone Biles had to withdraw from the gymnastics team final at the Tokyo Olympics on Tuesday.

Simone, the face of not only gymnastics but perhaps of the entire summer games, awkwardly performed a vault and walked off the floor.

USA Gymnastics said she had pulled out of the competition “due to a medical issue” and will be assessed daily.

“We hope this isn’t the last we’ve seen of one of the world’s best gymnasts,” the Tokyo Olympics’ Twitter account wrote.

“I feel sick to my stomach; it’s horrible,” former Olympic teammate Aly Raisman told Today. “I’m obviously praying that she’ll be able to compete in the all-around final.”

Crushed fans and some celebs chimed in as well.

 
collect
3
Jeff Smith 2021-02-24
img
In a pioneering experiment, scientists taught pigs how to play a video game. What they discovered challenges established theories on animal intelligence.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-12-18
img
Get your binoculars (or not) and let’s explore the reaches of our galaxy and the craters of the moon.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-07-30
img
This could be a ruh-roh moment for Google.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2021-05-02
img
Buffett said that while the odds of profiting from day trading stocks and derivatives are better than playing the state lottery
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2021-02-05
img
"This takes us a step closer to our mission of improving life on Earth from space."
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-09-02
img
Gray Malin's whimsical photos of the beach and iconic hotels have become synonymous with luxury and escapism. Here's how he built his career.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-07-20
img
Hi-res images of another product OnePlus has yet to officially launch.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2021-03-06
img
It’s A Sin has proved to be one of the biggest talking points of the year so far, and while it may have finished a
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2021-01-12
img
Did you know that Netflix is home to a trove of Hindi cinema? We scoured the streaming platform to bring you our own list of the best Hindi movies to watch.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-08-21
img

You’re reading Sex Diaries, a HuffPost UK Personal series about how we are (or aren’t) having sex. To share your story, get in touch on [email protected]

I looked nervously at my overdraft. The UK had gone into lockdown, and people were losing their jobs left, right and centre. I had a narrow escape from redundancy last summer and feared my luck was about to run out. I was £700 in debt, and I had to act quickly.

Surely there was some way of turning faceless nudes into cash, I hoped.

Three months into lockdown, I struck gold, when I found a webcam agency online. It sounded too good to be true, with the agent promising that even the lowest earners could turn over a grand a month for very little work. But it was worth a shot.

While I’d managed to avoid being furloughed and was promised that my day job was secure, I jumped at the chance to come out of this apocalypse richer than I went in. Even at the best of times, my journalism and writing only pay so much. I’ve struggled with my mental health since I developed OCD in my early 20s. Camming now offered me not only an escape from my overdraft, but the means to pay the thousands required for a course of specialist therapy that isn’t available on the NHS.

“The girls who show their face full time can pull in as much as £7,000 a month,” the agent told me as I registered, “but I’d say you can make £300 a week for an hour or so a day.”

I was nervous. I’d never faked an orgasm in my life, but you gotta do what you gotta do.

I sent the agent my passport, nudes that never earned me a penny when they first were taken for exes, and he went through the basics with me over the phone. I was to smile and be nice to everyone (regular clients are the key to long-term success), and, most importantly, I had to remember that it is a fantasy: if a man wanted me to call him “daddy” or pretend to be a schoolgirl, it wasn’t necessarily an indication that he should be on a register. He had probably just seen too much porn.

I was nervous. I’d never faked an orgasm in my life, but you gotta do what you gotta do. I was soon given a wealth of acronyms to learn when clients began to check out the “new girl”—JOI (jerk-off instructions), COI (cum-eating introductions), and SPH (small penis humiliation).

One of my first memorable clients was a man who asked for CBT (cock and ball torture, naturally). The moment I answered the call, he pulled up a piece of card covered in nearly arranged lines of cocaine.

“Tell me to snort it,” he said.

I went along with it. He obliged. I hit a riding crop off my hand for a wonderful spanking effect. Then the unthinkable happened: he tied a belt around his genitals. As his penis turned purple, he bashed his testicles off a table.

“Harder,” I said. “If you can walk tomorrow, you’ve not done it hard enough.”

He returned for round two a week later. In that time, I’d made the £300-a-week I was predicted, and I’d had my first non-sexual clients. I thought I’d be getting paid to strip and masturbate, but in reality, that’s only what I’m asked for a fraction of the time.

“Sorry to be boring,” one user typed when the call began, “but I just want to talk.”

“Tell me about some of your craziest clients,” he continued. “You must have seen everything.” No prizes for guessing who I mentioned.

Camming, like every job, has its downsides. I sometimes feel like a piece of meat...

We spent the rest of the chat talking about classic rock and exchanging song recommendations. I felt bad that he was paying me just to talk, but when he explained what he did for a living, it was clear that he could afford it. Cam girls were his therapy.

“I’m married,” another client confessed, “and my wife’s away for a few days. I like coming here for some company.” Fair enough, I thought, running my hands over my breasts.

Camming, like every job, has its downsides. I sometimes feel like a piece of meat – compliments about the shape of my breasts, my vagina and derrière make me feel objectified, especially when I get comments like “you have a better body than my girlfriend”. I’ve also had concerning requests for age play and CNC (consensual non-consent), and I’ve been disturbed how common these fantasies are.  But my agent has never forced me to do anything. I simply say no, and that’s enough.

I quickly began to value my time more than ever before because of camming. While I’ve had some wonderful relationships, I’ve had some nasty ones too. I’d have never stood for them if I’d known my company alone – and not my body – was worth £2 a minute. An unpleasant ex used to make fun of my breasts, claiming that they were too small, but I’ve had countless strangers praise them for being an ample addition to my petite frame.

This job has proved to me that I am a more social person than I ever gave myself credit for too. I’ve had virgins come to me ashamed about their lack of experience and I’ve reassured them that it is no bad thing, and I’ve lost count of the number of men I’ve assured that size really doesn’t matter. Camming has even increased my confidence in my ability to improve someone’s day when they simply come to me for a chat – I make it my mission to find out what a client wants and to give to them to the best of my ability. Sex work is work, after all, and I want to do a good job.

I don’t know how long I will cam for. It’s improving my life in the here and now, but I imagine that long-term it is likely to be unsustainable because of the effects it is slowly having on my opinion on some of my more disturbing clients. I don’t want to hate men, and I don’t want to be walking down the street imagining what run-of-the-mill strangers passing me by might say when protected by the anonymity of a webcam.

Silk bed sheets, designer shoes, and a therapist who is holding me to account for my OCD behaviour have helped me through quarantine. And ultimately, I’m coming out financially better off and more confident in my worth than I’ve ever been in my life.

Kate O’Kelly is a freelance journalist, writing under a pseudonym

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-07-18
img
As flat-screen technology killed CRT and rear projection, TVs grew bigger, more affordable and with a better picture than ever before.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2021-03-02
img
Celebrate the stories of strong women, from a Supreme Court justice and a soul singer whose names you know to a Ugandan chess champ you've probably never heard of.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-12-30
img
As SUVs continue to gain steam in America, 2021 sees a wave of sedans, convertibles and subcompacts that won't make the cut.
collect
0
Jeff Smith 2020-08-18
img

ryan gosling

  • Gigapixel AI, an artificial intelligence-powered photo editing application, interpreted a blurry spot in an image as Ryan Gosling and added the actor's face.
  • A photographer was using the software to enlarge an image when he noticed the actor's face, according to PetaPixel.
  • AI allows for machines to learn and carry out human-like tasks, and the advanced tech has been applied to a variety of fields, but it still has its downfalls.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

While processing an image, a piece of artificial intelligence software thought it spotted Ryan Gosling in a blurry part of the photo — so it added the actor's face in.

The software, Gigapixel AI by Topaz Labs, allows users to enlarge photos while maintaining picture clarity. As PetaPixel reports, a photographer and retoucher named Jomppe Vaarakallio was using it when he noticed the software turned a fuzzy patch in the image into a somewhat distorted face of the actor.

You can see the before and after below:

Varrakallio told the blog that Gosling's face disappeared when he turned off Gigapixel AI's "detect faces" feature. 

AI technology has allowed machines to learn from data and then carry out human-like tasks. It has been applied across various fields, including the medical arena, but the tech still has too many pitfalls for it to be applied for mass use — like, for example, thinking the face of an actor is hiding in an image when it's not. 

SEE ALSO: A Reddit user created a fake, AI-generated voice of famed narrator David Attenborough that reads misguided relationship advice

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

collect
0
Jeff Smith 2019-11-08
img

From its spirited beginnings, the state has always signaled possibility, but more and more, as the planet’s temperatures rise, as earthquakes continue to rattle with unpredictable fury, and bigger and deadlier fires ravage the state, the thought of disaster chokes the mind.

In July, the writer Jon Mooallem reported on the historic 2018 wildfires that gripped the northern California township of Paradise last November.

It was a snapshot of a future that is already consuming us.

“It was all more evidence that the natural world was warping, outpacing our capacity to prepare for, or even conceive of, the magnitude of disaster that such a disordered earth can produce,” Mooallem wrote in his investigation for The New York Times.

“Nature is increasingly finding a foothold in the unimaginable: what’s not just unprecedented but also hopelessly far beyond what we’ve seen.

This is a realm beyond disaster, where catastrophes live.”

collect
0
Jeff Smith 2021-07-27
img

Fans are crestfallen that Simone Biles had to withdraw from the gymnastics team final at the Tokyo Olympics on Tuesday.

Simone, the face of not only gymnastics but perhaps of the entire summer games, awkwardly performed a vault and walked off the floor.

USA Gymnastics said she had pulled out of the competition “due to a medical issue” and will be assessed daily.

“We hope this isn’t the last we’ve seen of one of the world’s best gymnasts,” the Tokyo Olympics’ Twitter account wrote.

“I feel sick to my stomach; it’s horrible,” former Olympic teammate Aly Raisman told Today. “I’m obviously praying that she’ll be able to compete in the all-around final.”

Crushed fans and some celebs chimed in as well.

 
Jeff Smith 2021-03-06
img
It’s A Sin has proved to be one of the biggest talking points of the year so far, and while it may have finished a
Jeff Smith 2021-02-24
img
In a pioneering experiment, scientists taught pigs how to play a video game. What they discovered challenges established theories on animal intelligence.
Jeff Smith 2021-01-12
img
Did you know that Netflix is home to a trove of Hindi cinema? We scoured the streaming platform to bring you our own list of the best Hindi movies to watch.
Jeff Smith 2020-12-18
img
Get your binoculars (or not) and let’s explore the reaches of our galaxy and the craters of the moon.
Jeff Smith 2020-08-21
img

You’re reading Sex Diaries, a HuffPost UK Personal series about how we are (or aren’t) having sex. To share your story, get in touch on [email protected]

I looked nervously at my overdraft. The UK had gone into lockdown, and people were losing their jobs left, right and centre. I had a narrow escape from redundancy last summer and feared my luck was about to run out. I was £700 in debt, and I had to act quickly.

Surely there was some way of turning faceless nudes into cash, I hoped.

Three months into lockdown, I struck gold, when I found a webcam agency online. It sounded too good to be true, with the agent promising that even the lowest earners could turn over a grand a month for very little work. But it was worth a shot.

While I’d managed to avoid being furloughed and was promised that my day job was secure, I jumped at the chance to come out of this apocalypse richer than I went in. Even at the best of times, my journalism and writing only pay so much. I’ve struggled with my mental health since I developed OCD in my early 20s. Camming now offered me not only an escape from my overdraft, but the means to pay the thousands required for a course of specialist therapy that isn’t available on the NHS.

“The girls who show their face full time can pull in as much as £7,000 a month,” the agent told me as I registered, “but I’d say you can make £300 a week for an hour or so a day.”

I was nervous. I’d never faked an orgasm in my life, but you gotta do what you gotta do.

I sent the agent my passport, nudes that never earned me a penny when they first were taken for exes, and he went through the basics with me over the phone. I was to smile and be nice to everyone (regular clients are the key to long-term success), and, most importantly, I had to remember that it is a fantasy: if a man wanted me to call him “daddy” or pretend to be a schoolgirl, it wasn’t necessarily an indication that he should be on a register. He had probably just seen too much porn.

I was nervous. I’d never faked an orgasm in my life, but you gotta do what you gotta do. I was soon given a wealth of acronyms to learn when clients began to check out the “new girl”—JOI (jerk-off instructions), COI (cum-eating introductions), and SPH (small penis humiliation).

One of my first memorable clients was a man who asked for CBT (cock and ball torture, naturally). The moment I answered the call, he pulled up a piece of card covered in nearly arranged lines of cocaine.

“Tell me to snort it,” he said.

I went along with it. He obliged. I hit a riding crop off my hand for a wonderful spanking effect. Then the unthinkable happened: he tied a belt around his genitals. As his penis turned purple, he bashed his testicles off a table.

“Harder,” I said. “If you can walk tomorrow, you’ve not done it hard enough.”

He returned for round two a week later. In that time, I’d made the £300-a-week I was predicted, and I’d had my first non-sexual clients. I thought I’d be getting paid to strip and masturbate, but in reality, that’s only what I’m asked for a fraction of the time.

“Sorry to be boring,” one user typed when the call began, “but I just want to talk.”

“Tell me about some of your craziest clients,” he continued. “You must have seen everything.” No prizes for guessing who I mentioned.

Camming, like every job, has its downsides. I sometimes feel like a piece of meat...

We spent the rest of the chat talking about classic rock and exchanging song recommendations. I felt bad that he was paying me just to talk, but when he explained what he did for a living, it was clear that he could afford it. Cam girls were his therapy.

“I’m married,” another client confessed, “and my wife’s away for a few days. I like coming here for some company.” Fair enough, I thought, running my hands over my breasts.

Camming, like every job, has its downsides. I sometimes feel like a piece of meat – compliments about the shape of my breasts, my vagina and derrière make me feel objectified, especially when I get comments like “you have a better body than my girlfriend”. I’ve also had concerning requests for age play and CNC (consensual non-consent), and I’ve been disturbed how common these fantasies are.  But my agent has never forced me to do anything. I simply say no, and that’s enough.

I quickly began to value my time more than ever before because of camming. While I’ve had some wonderful relationships, I’ve had some nasty ones too. I’d have never stood for them if I’d known my company alone – and not my body – was worth £2 a minute. An unpleasant ex used to make fun of my breasts, claiming that they were too small, but I’ve had countless strangers praise them for being an ample addition to my petite frame.

This job has proved to me that I am a more social person than I ever gave myself credit for too. I’ve had virgins come to me ashamed about their lack of experience and I’ve reassured them that it is no bad thing, and I’ve lost count of the number of men I’ve assured that size really doesn’t matter. Camming has even increased my confidence in my ability to improve someone’s day when they simply come to me for a chat – I make it my mission to find out what a client wants and to give to them to the best of my ability. Sex work is work, after all, and I want to do a good job.

I don’t know how long I will cam for. It’s improving my life in the here and now, but I imagine that long-term it is likely to be unsustainable because of the effects it is slowly having on my opinion on some of my more disturbing clients. I don’t want to hate men, and I don’t want to be walking down the street imagining what run-of-the-mill strangers passing me by might say when protected by the anonymity of a webcam.

Silk bed sheets, designer shoes, and a therapist who is holding me to account for my OCD behaviour have helped me through quarantine. And ultimately, I’m coming out financially better off and more confident in my worth than I’ve ever been in my life.

Kate O’Kelly is a freelance journalist, writing under a pseudonym

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

Jeff Smith 2020-07-30
img
This could be a ruh-roh moment for Google.
Jeff Smith 2020-07-18
img
As flat-screen technology killed CRT and rear projection, TVs grew bigger, more affordable and with a better picture than ever before.
Jeff Smith 2021-05-02
img
Buffett said that while the odds of profiting from day trading stocks and derivatives are better than playing the state lottery
Jeff Smith 2021-03-02
img
Celebrate the stories of strong women, from a Supreme Court justice and a soul singer whose names you know to a Ugandan chess champ you've probably never heard of.
Jeff Smith 2021-02-05
img
"This takes us a step closer to our mission of improving life on Earth from space."
Jeff Smith 2020-12-30
img
As SUVs continue to gain steam in America, 2021 sees a wave of sedans, convertibles and subcompacts that won't make the cut.
Jeff Smith 2020-09-02
img
Gray Malin's whimsical photos of the beach and iconic hotels have become synonymous with luxury and escapism. Here's how he built his career.
Jeff Smith 2020-08-18
img

ryan gosling

  • Gigapixel AI, an artificial intelligence-powered photo editing application, interpreted a blurry spot in an image as Ryan Gosling and added the actor's face.
  • A photographer was using the software to enlarge an image when he noticed the actor's face, according to PetaPixel.
  • AI allows for machines to learn and carry out human-like tasks, and the advanced tech has been applied to a variety of fields, but it still has its downfalls.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

While processing an image, a piece of artificial intelligence software thought it spotted Ryan Gosling in a blurry part of the photo — so it added the actor's face in.

The software, Gigapixel AI by Topaz Labs, allows users to enlarge photos while maintaining picture clarity. As PetaPixel reports, a photographer and retoucher named Jomppe Vaarakallio was using it when he noticed the software turned a fuzzy patch in the image into a somewhat distorted face of the actor.

You can see the before and after below:

Varrakallio told the blog that Gosling's face disappeared when he turned off Gigapixel AI's "detect faces" feature. 

AI technology has allowed machines to learn from data and then carry out human-like tasks. It has been applied across various fields, including the medical arena, but the tech still has too many pitfalls for it to be applied for mass use — like, for example, thinking the face of an actor is hiding in an image when it's not. 

SEE ALSO: A Reddit user created a fake, AI-generated voice of famed narrator David Attenborough that reads misguided relationship advice

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

Jeff Smith 2020-07-20
img
Hi-res images of another product OnePlus has yet to officially launch.
Jeff Smith 2019-11-08
img

From its spirited beginnings, the state has always signaled possibility, but more and more, as the planet’s temperatures rise, as earthquakes continue to rattle with unpredictable fury, and bigger and deadlier fires ravage the state, the thought of disaster chokes the mind.

In July, the writer Jon Mooallem reported on the historic 2018 wildfires that gripped the northern California township of Paradise last November.

It was a snapshot of a future that is already consuming us.

“It was all more evidence that the natural world was warping, outpacing our capacity to prepare for, or even conceive of, the magnitude of disaster that such a disordered earth can produce,” Mooallem wrote in his investigation for The New York Times.

“Nature is increasingly finding a foothold in the unimaginable: what’s not just unprecedented but also hopelessly far beyond what we’ve seen.

This is a realm beyond disaster, where catastrophes live.”