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Lamont Shaw 2021-07-26
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One of the most interesting JavaScript frameworks gaining traction these days is SolidJS. Solid is interesting because it takes JSX (React’s templating language) in novel directions. It decorates JSX with a handful of reactive primitives. It is compiled (similar to Svelte). It layers on higher-order services (like a central store and events). And for good measure, it tosses in full-featured SSR (server-side rendering) and Suspense.

I talked to Solid’s creator, Ryan Carniato, about how he and the Solid team pulled this off, how Solid relates to industry developments, how innovative front-end features (like partial hydration, streaming SSR, and Suspense) are implemented, and what motivates him to keep pushing the limits of front-end JavaScript performance.

To read this article in full, please click here

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Lamont Shaw 2021-06-24
img
A kangaroo pouch is far more complex than a simple pocket. It has antimicrobial sweat glands, custom milk, and everything else a joey needs to grow.
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-03-29
img

A perkless, remote, Zoom clogged reality has led some agency employees to reconsider their commitment to the business.

The post ‘A hampster wheel’: Confessions of an ex-agency exec on leaving the business — for good appeared first on Digiday.

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0
Lamont Shaw 2021-01-01
Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

With all the mental burdens that came with living in 2020 — including gyms closing their doors — many have found it tough to get in their normal level of exercise. Here at The Verge, we coped with this as you might expect: with tech that could enable or motivate us to get some activity in. These are the gadgets, apps, games, and services we used to work up a sweat while still staying safe, and which might prove useful if your New Year’s resolution involves exercise.

Beat Saber

I named Beat Saber my favorite game of 2018, but I lapsed hard since, until Oculus released the Quest 2 in October. It’s the first VR headset I like wearing, and I used SideQuest to add bootleg custom tracks that support my embarrassingly narrow musical taste,...

Continue reading…

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0
Lamont Shaw 2021-07-23
img
Also debuting at [email protected]: The first teaser for animated series Star Trek: Prodigy.
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-06-20
img
While you probably won't be able to find any graphics cards deals this year, you can still save big on components on Prime Day.
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-03-03
img
Whether or not you leave your company by choice, accepting the change opens up new possibilities, writes startup founder and investor Dave Nemetz.
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2020-12-29
img
Doctors only have a a brief window - around 10 days - to administer monoclonal antibodies, and some may still be hesitant to prescribe them.
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0
Lamont Shaw 2021-07-15
img

“Ten years ago, I thought love was about knowing every corner of another person and not wanting to be with anybody else,” says Natasha Lunn, as we discuss love – at length – over the phone for an hour. 

“Now, I think it’s a choice you make every day with yourself and with another person. It’s a frequency you can choose to tune into or ignore. And it’s not just between two people. Love requires you to love many number of people and allow them to see you in different ways.”

Lunn has been researching love for four years, having started her popular newsletter – Conversations on Love – back in 2017. Twice a month, she’d interview an expert who had something valuable to say about relationships, to uncover truths about love in all its forms.

Now, she’s written a book of the same name. 

Natasha Lunn and her debut book, Conversations on Love

I followed Lunn’s newsletter from those early days, tearing up through several of her interviews on the Tube to work after a painful breakup. I messaged her on Twitter in 2018 to say how much those words had helped. And, since then, as my own understanding of love progressed, I became fascinated with the nuances of love that experts would share with her – romantic love, yes, but also our love for family, friends, and children. 

“I’ve always been obsessed with what I thought was love,” says Lunn whose book intertwines the interviews with a lot of honesty about her own loves and losses. “But what I was obsessed with was longing. I guess we obsess over what we lack – I couldn’t find a way to make relationships work. I typically put a lot of energy into stuff – work, friendships – and I found those things easy, but relationships hard. It’d never go right for me.”

Lunn realised it was, in fact, infatuation that held its grip on her. Later on, in her 30s, she started to understand she had misunderstood love entirely. “Love was even a bigger mystery than I once thought,” she says. “I thought romantic relationships were love, but I fell deeper into the mystery once I had a relationship and was trying for a baby after miscarriage. I was getting those longing feelings again and, all of a sudden, I was obsessed with trying to conceive. I wanted to understand where that longing comes from.”

Lunn felt like the way she used to be in relationships was a private shame. She was embarrassed for a long time how she would change shape and lose herself. “But I spoke to other people, including smart, successful woman, who say: ‘I completely did the same thing’, and I realised it’s a deeply unoriginal problem.”

The problem, perhaps, is that many of us from a young age believe love is about knowing everything about somebody. About not being able to live without them. Going into relationships, Lunn would “fear change and the unknown”.

Now, she says, she understands that being in love means tolerating the mystery – and that mystery is actually what makes it more beautiful.

Learning about love, though, has been a long and ongoing process. She initially learned from books, she says, remembering a quote from Bell Hooks: “The lack of education around love means a lot of it comes down to books. The job of books to educate us.”

But while books filled a gap, the heartbreak was still necessary. “You can’t protect yourself from that,” she says. “You do need to learn through heartbreak – my issue was I didn’t leave some of those patterns and habits that are natural as a teenager there, I carried them on into adulthood.” Young people should have infatuations, she says – enjoy the fantasy and feel the lure – but be able to distinguish between reality and fantasy. 

Love was even a bigger mystery than I once thought.

Lunn wanted to balance a message that romantic love shouldn’t be the finish line, while making space for people to say, “I want a relationship”.

She’d read a lot of books about needing to be happy and find contentment on your own, and not chasing love. “I felt like a failure,” she says. “I wondered what was wrong with me. But I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. Some people don’t want romantic relationship. And others, if you want romance, should be able to voice that. I wish I was less embarrassed about trying it.”

Her book guides you through chapters and interviews on finding and sustaining love, but also surviving losing it. How do we keep comfortable with the mystery?

“Our natural state is lazy, cranky and busy,” says Lunn. “We have to find rituals and tricks to keep coming back to what matters. In love, we need these reminders. We need to put them in place. We can’t go around every day automatically thinking, ‘I love you!’ We need some sort of reminder to trip ourselves out of our frustrated stress.”

Perhaps one of the most inviting aspects of the book is how it covers love in all forms – with our family, friends, romantic partners, children. For Lunn, it also included the love she had for a child who never came to exist. “At first, I felt like I couldn’t even write about it,” she says, speaking of her miscarriage. “Could I count it as love? How could you love something you never held?”

It took her a while to give herself permission to love in that sense, she says. “All forms of love are so different, but we need all of them. Even now, having my daughter, people say, ‘motherhood is most amazing love’. And I think, it’s a huge shifting of yourself and beyond your control. I felt like an animal when I first loved her, it wasn’t an actively made together love – like romantic love. It’s a beautiful love, devoted to another person.”

Lunn wanted to show these other forms of love are no less important. “It was my mistake to think, I will only be happy if I have this,” she says. “I would be devastated if I couldn’t have had a baby. But I wanted to show it wasn’t all or nothing. There were other forms of love in my life, through every decision of choice or circumstance – and you have to look around. Of course, I don’t want to underplay how difficult it is for women who are trying to conceive.”

The mistakes we make in love, says Lunn, are unavoidable – but we can learn from them. What are the most common? “Trying to talk someone out of their feelings,” she says, “and trying to compete in relationships – that’s the death of love”. In friendships, she says, we should be honest about envy and stop being afraid of saying difficult things. And with our families, we should remember love isn’t inevitable, and we still have to be as active in those relationships as in our friendships and romantic relationships. As she puts it: “we should be curious to keep knowing the people we love, as we change.”

Conversations on Love is published by Viking on July 15.

collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-05-26
img
We tested the Dyson V15 Detect against the current V11 range to find out which really is the best cordless vacuum
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-02-18
img
After a few hours with Steam's newest Early Access success, which surpassed 2 million sales in less than two weeks, the game's allure becomes clear.
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2020-08-25
img

TLDR: The Ultimate PMP, Six Sigma and Minitab Certification Bundle prepares learners for the process of training and statistics mastery to be a respected project manager. Training to become a certified project manager may include some of the most diverse and widest-ranging skill sets in business education. From focuses on process-driven step-by-step methodology to fostering better communication to hardcore stat-heavy data analytics understanding, the shaping of a true project manager brings a lot to the table. Like we said, it’s a lot. But with the training in The Ultimate PMP, Six Sigma and Minitab Certification Bundle ($49.99, over 90 percent…

This story continues at The Next Web
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Lamont Shaw 2021-07-08
img
Facebook rejects claims made in a new book that policy issues have driven a wedge between the company's two top execs.
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-05-20
img
For decades, red wine has been the "healthy" alcohol, set on a pedestal against its contemporaries. But, is red wine actually good for you?
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-01-28
img
The board’s first content moderation decisions show how impossible its task—and Facebook’s—really is.
collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2019-11-13
img

As in previous editions, the Menlo Park company tracked metrics across a number of policies — 10 in all — in the second and third fiscal quarter, focusing on the prevalence of prohibited content that made its way onto Facebook and the volume of this content it successfully removed.

For the first time, Facebook detailed how it’s taking action on suicide and self-injury content and provided prevalence metrics regarding regulated goods content — i.e., illicit sales of firearms and drugs.

“We’ll continue to refine the processes we use to measure our actions and build a robust system to ensure the metrics we provide are accurate,” wrote Facebook VP of integrity Guy Rosen in a blog post.

On the subject of self-harm and self-injury content, Facebook says it made technological improvements to find and remove a higher volume of violating content.

In Q3, that number hit 2.5 million pieces, of which 97.3% was detected proactively.

Facebook claims that for every 10,000 views on Facebook or Instagram in Q3 2019, no more than four contained content that violated its policies on suicide and self-injury and regulated goods.

collect
0
Lamont Shaw 2021-07-26
img

One of the most interesting JavaScript frameworks gaining traction these days is SolidJS. Solid is interesting because it takes JSX (React’s templating language) in novel directions. It decorates JSX with a handful of reactive primitives. It is compiled (similar to Svelte). It layers on higher-order services (like a central store and events). And for good measure, it tosses in full-featured SSR (server-side rendering) and Suspense.

I talked to Solid’s creator, Ryan Carniato, about how he and the Solid team pulled this off, how Solid relates to industry developments, how innovative front-end features (like partial hydration, streaming SSR, and Suspense) are implemented, and what motivates him to keep pushing the limits of front-end JavaScript performance.

To read this article in full, please click here

Lamont Shaw 2021-07-15
img

“Ten years ago, I thought love was about knowing every corner of another person and not wanting to be with anybody else,” says Natasha Lunn, as we discuss love – at length – over the phone for an hour. 

“Now, I think it’s a choice you make every day with yourself and with another person. It’s a frequency you can choose to tune into or ignore. And it’s not just between two people. Love requires you to love many number of people and allow them to see you in different ways.”

Lunn has been researching love for four years, having started her popular newsletter – Conversations on Love – back in 2017. Twice a month, she’d interview an expert who had something valuable to say about relationships, to uncover truths about love in all its forms.

Now, she’s written a book of the same name. 

Natasha Lunn and her debut book, Conversations on Love

I followed Lunn’s newsletter from those early days, tearing up through several of her interviews on the Tube to work after a painful breakup. I messaged her on Twitter in 2018 to say how much those words had helped. And, since then, as my own understanding of love progressed, I became fascinated with the nuances of love that experts would share with her – romantic love, yes, but also our love for family, friends, and children. 

“I’ve always been obsessed with what I thought was love,” says Lunn whose book intertwines the interviews with a lot of honesty about her own loves and losses. “But what I was obsessed with was longing. I guess we obsess over what we lack – I couldn’t find a way to make relationships work. I typically put a lot of energy into stuff – work, friendships – and I found those things easy, but relationships hard. It’d never go right for me.”

Lunn realised it was, in fact, infatuation that held its grip on her. Later on, in her 30s, she started to understand she had misunderstood love entirely. “Love was even a bigger mystery than I once thought,” she says. “I thought romantic relationships were love, but I fell deeper into the mystery once I had a relationship and was trying for a baby after miscarriage. I was getting those longing feelings again and, all of a sudden, I was obsessed with trying to conceive. I wanted to understand where that longing comes from.”

Lunn felt like the way she used to be in relationships was a private shame. She was embarrassed for a long time how she would change shape and lose herself. “But I spoke to other people, including smart, successful woman, who say: ‘I completely did the same thing’, and I realised it’s a deeply unoriginal problem.”

The problem, perhaps, is that many of us from a young age believe love is about knowing everything about somebody. About not being able to live without them. Going into relationships, Lunn would “fear change and the unknown”.

Now, she says, she understands that being in love means tolerating the mystery – and that mystery is actually what makes it more beautiful.

Learning about love, though, has been a long and ongoing process. She initially learned from books, she says, remembering a quote from Bell Hooks: “The lack of education around love means a lot of it comes down to books. The job of books to educate us.”

But while books filled a gap, the heartbreak was still necessary. “You can’t protect yourself from that,” she says. “You do need to learn through heartbreak – my issue was I didn’t leave some of those patterns and habits that are natural as a teenager there, I carried them on into adulthood.” Young people should have infatuations, she says – enjoy the fantasy and feel the lure – but be able to distinguish between reality and fantasy. 

Love was even a bigger mystery than I once thought.

Lunn wanted to balance a message that romantic love shouldn’t be the finish line, while making space for people to say, “I want a relationship”.

She’d read a lot of books about needing to be happy and find contentment on your own, and not chasing love. “I felt like a failure,” she says. “I wondered what was wrong with me. But I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. Some people don’t want romantic relationship. And others, if you want romance, should be able to voice that. I wish I was less embarrassed about trying it.”

Her book guides you through chapters and interviews on finding and sustaining love, but also surviving losing it. How do we keep comfortable with the mystery?

“Our natural state is lazy, cranky and busy,” says Lunn. “We have to find rituals and tricks to keep coming back to what matters. In love, we need these reminders. We need to put them in place. We can’t go around every day automatically thinking, ‘I love you!’ We need some sort of reminder to trip ourselves out of our frustrated stress.”

Perhaps one of the most inviting aspects of the book is how it covers love in all forms – with our family, friends, romantic partners, children. For Lunn, it also included the love she had for a child who never came to exist. “At first, I felt like I couldn’t even write about it,” she says, speaking of her miscarriage. “Could I count it as love? How could you love something you never held?”

It took her a while to give herself permission to love in that sense, she says. “All forms of love are so different, but we need all of them. Even now, having my daughter, people say, ‘motherhood is most amazing love’. And I think, it’s a huge shifting of yourself and beyond your control. I felt like an animal when I first loved her, it wasn’t an actively made together love – like romantic love. It’s a beautiful love, devoted to another person.”

Lunn wanted to show these other forms of love are no less important. “It was my mistake to think, I will only be happy if I have this,” she says. “I would be devastated if I couldn’t have had a baby. But I wanted to show it wasn’t all or nothing. There were other forms of love in my life, through every decision of choice or circumstance – and you have to look around. Of course, I don’t want to underplay how difficult it is for women who are trying to conceive.”

The mistakes we make in love, says Lunn, are unavoidable – but we can learn from them. What are the most common? “Trying to talk someone out of their feelings,” she says, “and trying to compete in relationships – that’s the death of love”. In friendships, she says, we should be honest about envy and stop being afraid of saying difficult things. And with our families, we should remember love isn’t inevitable, and we still have to be as active in those relationships as in our friendships and romantic relationships. As she puts it: “we should be curious to keep knowing the people we love, as we change.”

Conversations on Love is published by Viking on July 15.

Lamont Shaw 2021-06-24
img
A kangaroo pouch is far more complex than a simple pocket. It has antimicrobial sweat glands, custom milk, and everything else a joey needs to grow.
Lamont Shaw 2021-05-26
img
We tested the Dyson V15 Detect against the current V11 range to find out which really is the best cordless vacuum
Lamont Shaw 2021-03-29
img

A perkless, remote, Zoom clogged reality has led some agency employees to reconsider their commitment to the business.

The post ‘A hampster wheel’: Confessions of an ex-agency exec on leaving the business — for good appeared first on Digiday.

Lamont Shaw 2021-02-18
img
After a few hours with Steam's newest Early Access success, which surpassed 2 million sales in less than two weeks, the game's allure becomes clear.
Lamont Shaw 2021-01-01
Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

With all the mental burdens that came with living in 2020 — including gyms closing their doors — many have found it tough to get in their normal level of exercise. Here at The Verge, we coped with this as you might expect: with tech that could enable or motivate us to get some activity in. These are the gadgets, apps, games, and services we used to work up a sweat while still staying safe, and which might prove useful if your New Year’s resolution involves exercise.

Beat Saber

I named Beat Saber my favorite game of 2018, but I lapsed hard since, until Oculus released the Quest 2 in October. It’s the first VR headset I like wearing, and I used SideQuest to add bootleg custom tracks that support my embarrassingly narrow musical taste,...

Continue reading…

Lamont Shaw 2020-08-25
img

TLDR: The Ultimate PMP, Six Sigma and Minitab Certification Bundle prepares learners for the process of training and statistics mastery to be a respected project manager. Training to become a certified project manager may include some of the most diverse and widest-ranging skill sets in business education. From focuses on process-driven step-by-step methodology to fostering better communication to hardcore stat-heavy data analytics understanding, the shaping of a true project manager brings a lot to the table. Like we said, it’s a lot. But with the training in The Ultimate PMP, Six Sigma and Minitab Certification Bundle ($49.99, over 90 percent…

This story continues at The Next Web
Lamont Shaw 2021-07-23
img
Also debuting at [email protected]: The first teaser for animated series Star Trek: Prodigy.
Lamont Shaw 2021-07-08
img
Facebook rejects claims made in a new book that policy issues have driven a wedge between the company's two top execs.
Lamont Shaw 2021-06-20
img
While you probably won't be able to find any graphics cards deals this year, you can still save big on components on Prime Day.
Lamont Shaw 2021-05-20
img
For decades, red wine has been the "healthy" alcohol, set on a pedestal against its contemporaries. But, is red wine actually good for you?
Lamont Shaw 2021-03-03
img
Whether or not you leave your company by choice, accepting the change opens up new possibilities, writes startup founder and investor Dave Nemetz.
Lamont Shaw 2021-01-28
img
The board’s first content moderation decisions show how impossible its task—and Facebook’s—really is.
Lamont Shaw 2020-12-29
img
Doctors only have a a brief window - around 10 days - to administer monoclonal antibodies, and some may still be hesitant to prescribe them.
Lamont Shaw 2019-11-13
img

As in previous editions, the Menlo Park company tracked metrics across a number of policies — 10 in all — in the second and third fiscal quarter, focusing on the prevalence of prohibited content that made its way onto Facebook and the volume of this content it successfully removed.

For the first time, Facebook detailed how it’s taking action on suicide and self-injury content and provided prevalence metrics regarding regulated goods content — i.e., illicit sales of firearms and drugs.

“We’ll continue to refine the processes we use to measure our actions and build a robust system to ensure the metrics we provide are accurate,” wrote Facebook VP of integrity Guy Rosen in a blog post.

On the subject of self-harm and self-injury content, Facebook says it made technological improvements to find and remove a higher volume of violating content.

In Q3, that number hit 2.5 million pieces, of which 97.3% was detected proactively.

Facebook claims that for every 10,000 views on Facebook or Instagram in Q3 2019, no more than four contained content that violated its policies on suicide and self-injury and regulated goods.