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Mary Jones 2021-07-23
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Director Kate Herron discusses the interesting romance that develops in Marvel's latest Disney Plus series.
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Mary Jones 2021-03-01
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With this thin microfluidic patch and an app, you’ll know if you’re staying hydrated
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Mary Jones 2020-07-31
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A heap of gems can be found on Amazon. Let's round them up.
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Mary Jones 2019-09-21
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The debate over the police using machine learning is intensifying – it is considered in some quarters as controversial as stop and search.

It has been heavily criticized for being discriminatory towards black and minority ethnic groups, and for having marginal effects on reducing crime.

In the same way, the police use of machine learning algorithms has been condemned by human rights groups who claim such programs encourage racial profiling and discrimination along with threatening privacy and freedom of expression.

Broadly speaking, machine learning uses data to teach computers to make decisions without explicitly instructing them how to do it.

Machine learning is used successfully in many industries to create efficiency, prioritize risk and improve decision making.

It is true that there are potential issues with any use of probabilistic machine learning algorithms in policing.

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Mary Jones 2021-07-20
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Seven in 10 disabled women say they have been sexually harassed at work, increasing to almost eight in 10 among those aged 18 to 34. 

These shocking statistics, which compare to 52% of women in general, are from a new report published by the the TUC that surveyed 2,003 disabled women about their careers. Of those, 1,162 respondents agreed to answer questions about their experiences of sexual harassment at work.

It’s been more than four years since the #MeToo movement took over our social media feeds, but this is the first major study into the sexual harassment of disabled women at work in Great Britain. As the report highlights, “the voices and experiences of disabled women have too infrequently been highlighted”. 

Common experiences shared by those surveyed included unwanted sexual advances (38%), unwanted touching (36%), and unwanted sexual touching/sexual assault (18%). 

One in 25 said they had experienced a serious sexual assault or rape at work. 

The research also suggests that many disabled women experience multiple forms of harassment in the workplace, with more than half of respondents (54%) saying they had experienced two or more types of sexually harassing behaviour, and 45% saying they had experienced three or more. “This points to workplace cultures where sexual harassment is a frequent and normalised occurrence rather than an isolated incident,” the authors said. 

The report identified great hesitancy among disabled women in reporting harassment at work. Two thirds (67%) of those who had experienced it did not report the harassment to their boss the most recent time it happened, with 39% saying this was because they did not believe they would be taken seriously.

Some said they were worried it would have a negative impact on their career or work relationships. Other reasons included not thinking they would be believed or thinking they would be blamed if they reported the incident.

And unfortunately, of those who did report the most recent instance of sexual harassment, more than half (53%) said it was not dealt with satisfactorily.

Unsurprisingly, this is having a huge impact on the wellbeing of women. 

Around one in three (34%) of those who disclosed harassment in the survey said their experiences had a negative impact on their mental health and more than one in five (21%) said it negatively affected their relationships with colleagues.

The experiences caused one in eight (12%) to leave their job or employer entirely. This is particularly troubling given disabled women already face significant barriers to getting into work and getting paid the same as non-disabled workers.

TUC research in October 2020 found that disabled women earned 36% less than non-disabled men. The analysis also found a huge unemployment gap; disabled women were 32.6% more likely to be unemployed when compared to non-disabled men. 

“Four years on from the explosion of #MeToo on a global scale, employers still aren’t doing enough to make sure women are safe at work. It’s time for every employer to take responsibility for protecting their staff from sexual harassment,” said TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady.

“Ministers must change the law to make employers protect workers from sexual harassment specifically, and from all forms of harassment by customers and clients. Anyone worried about sexual harassment at work should get in touch with their union.” 

Useful helplines and websites:

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Mary Jones 2020-10-07
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Outdoor Voices designed workout wear called TechSweat specifically built for sweaty, high-intensity workouts. Here's what we thought after testing its leggings.
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Mary Jones 2020-07-24
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Amazon baldking Jeff Bezos added $13 billion to his net worth earlier this week, quite simply a stupid amount of wealth for just one person to acquire in one day — billionaire chief exec or otherwise. And so, one Twitter account is hilariously posing a very poignant question: has Jeff Bezos decided to end world hunger? @HasBezosDecided’s bio cites a report from the Institute of Food Policy Research Institute that found that solving world hunger by 2030 would cost $11 billion in extra spending each year. Every day, the account confirms whether Bezos has bothered to contribute what represents a small fraction…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Amazon,Twitter
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Mary Jones 2019-09-21

People liked the concept of not having to carry their flagship smartphones during their training, outdoor activities or even places where carrying an expensive smartphone is risky.

Zeblaze is a Chinese company founded in 2014 in Shenzhen, China.

In the past 5 years the company has managed to join the smartwatch industry leaders by having exceptional best-sellers with outstanding quality and competitive pricing.

Smart Watch Mode utilizes a MediaTek SoC to provide an excellent 4G smartwatch mode, where the watch can be used with or without a smartphone synced in.

Zeblaze THOR 5 – Specifications

Dial material: Case Material – Zinc alloy, Strap Material – Silicone

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Mary Jones 2021-05-21
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Lady Gaga says she suffered a “total psychotic break” after being left pregnant by her rapist.

The Rain On Me singer features alongside Prince Harry and Oprah Winfrey in the Apple TV documentary series, The Me You Can’t See, which sees a number of stars discussing their mental health struggles.

Gaga says she was 19 when a producer threatened to burn her music if she did not take her clothes off.

Fighting back tears, the 35-year-old singer said: “And they didn’t stop asking me, and then I just froze, and I just – I don’t even remember.”

She said she cannot name her alleged attacker, adding: “I do not ever want to face that person again.”

Lady Gaga

Gaga, who first spoke publicly of being raped in 2014, described an incident years later when she went to hospital for acute pain and numbness and was surprised to be treated by a psychiatrist.

“First I felt full-on pain, then I went numb,” she said. “And then I was sick for weeks and weeks and weeks and weeks after, and I realised that it was the same pain that I felt when the person who raped me dropped me off pregnant on a corner, at my parents’ house because I was vomiting and sick.

“Because I’d been abused. I was locked away in a studio for months.”

The singer went on to discuss how trauma can change you as a person and she was not the same after being sexually assaulted.

“I had a total psychotic break, and for a couple years, I was not the same girl,” she said.

“The way that I feel when I feel pain was how I felt after I was raped.

“I’ve had so many MRIs and scans where they don’t find nothing. But your body remembers.”

Gaga said she has felt like “there’s a black cloud that is following you wherever you go telling you that you are worthless and should die”.

And discussing her self-harm, she said: “You know why it’s not good to cut? You know why it’s not good to throw yourself against the wall? You know why it’s not good to self-harm? Because it makes you feel worse. You think you’re going to feel better because you’re showing somebody, ‘Look, I’m in pain’. It doesn’t help.

“I always tell people, ‘tell somebody, don’t show somebody.’”

Gaga described the improvement of her mental health as “a slow rise” but warned it was not a “straight line”.

She said: “Even if I have six brilliant months, all it takes is getting triggered once to feel bad. And when I say feel bad, I mean want to cut, think about dying, wondering if I’m ever gonna do it.”

The chart-topping singer said she gradually learned how to cope with unwanted and damaging emotions, but it was a slow process that took two-and-a-half years.

Asked what she was doing during that time, Gaga quipped: “I won an Oscar.”

She won best original song in 2019 for Shallow, a track from A Star Is Born.

The Me You Can’t See is streaming on Apple TV+ now.

  • Rape Crisis services for women and girls who have been raped or have experienced sexual violence - 0808 802 9999
  • Survivors UK offers support for men and boys - 0203 598 3898
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Mary Jones 2020-09-30
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Feeling blue? You’re not alone. The Covid-19 pandemic has had clear repercussions for mental health, with some people impacted more than others. A study published in the Lancet journal comparing our mental health in April 2019 to this year found the prevalence of “clinically significant” levels of mental distress have risen from 18.9% to 27.3%. Increases were greatest among 18- to 34-year-olds, women and people living with young children.

With local lockdowns coming back into effect across parts of the UK, more people are once again confined to their homes without social contact, and many of us are experiencing an overwhelming sense of déjà vu. 

Dr Niall Campbell, psychiatrist and consultant at the Priory hospital in Roehampton, is also worried about the impact of what he calls “Covid burnout” on the generation of women, mostly aged 50-60, who are “sandwiched” between jobs, a dependent child and an adult relative who requires care.

Many people are working long hours through fear of losing their job and because days and nights are blurring into one, he adds – and alcohol can become a crutch for some when there’s an absence of support. “Long hours generally mean less sleep, poorer diet, less exercise, more stress, feeling you are constantly ‘on’ and having to prove yourself,” he says.

On top of that, as autumn turns to winter, some of us are facing down the prospect of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which sees roughly one in 15 in the UK hit with feelings of lethargy and depression on a life-altering scale. 

So, how can you keep your head above water in the months ahead? Thankfully, there are ways. With lockdown part two on the cards, here’s your ultimate self-care toolkit for staying buoyant in the months ahead.

Take your annual leave, even if you stay home

Current local lockdown and quarantine restrictions make planning hard, but taking leave is crucial right now – even if the only place you go is your living room.

Dr Gary Wood, author of The Psychology of Wellbeing (out in October), says a well-earned break is crucial for us to reflect and plan. “When we relax, we access the full range of higher-level functions such as problem-solving and planning,” he says. “But over the pandemic, we might have not had the time out to stock-take and plan.”

If you can’t go anywhere, Wood recommends creating a mini-break or spa day at home. Stuck for ideas of what to do? Holistic health and lifestyle coach Milla Lascelles previously shared her top tips with HuffPost UK.

Keep in touch with loved ones

“News of tightening of social measures to combat the rising number of Covid-19 infections will be making the winter months ahead look even darker for many people,” says Dr Keith Grimes, a GP for online doctor service Babylon. 

Feelings of sadness are understandable, he notes, but know that we have learned a huge amount about how to reduce the spread of this illness and treat it successfully. So it’s not all doom and gloom.

During this time it’s important to stay in touch with friends and family, he says. If you live alone, it’s worth bubbling up with another household so you can spend time with them. And if you can’t see others, it might help to schedule regular FaceTime conversations or phone calls with your nearest and dearest.

Dr Aragona Giuseppe, a GP and medical advisor for Prescription Doctor, says calling friends and family will not only lift you, but also be a lovely surprise for the other person. “We may not be able to meet all our friends at the pub, but a Zoom call or a phone call should help to boost your mood and remind you what’s waiting at the end of this lockdown.”

Social media can be useful for keeping in touch with others however it should complement phone calls and face-to-face chats, rather than replace them.

Plan time to enjoy yourself

We might be stuck at home day in, day out but that doesn’t mean you can’t plan smaller activities to look forward to – whether that’s a trip to the coast for a blast of fresh air and a long walk, a night away from home in a hotel, or a visit to that restaurant you’ve been meaning to check out for some time.

“Make sure you plan time to enjoy yourself, exercise, and get outside in nature and experience the change of the seasons in person,” advises Dr Grimes.

Failing that, why not treat yourself to a pamper day? Hair salons, massage parlours and nail bars are still open and in need of your support.

Create a self-care box

One of Mind’s top tips for people with SAD is to fill a box with things that comfort you or help you to relax – also known as a self-care box.

Try including your favourite book or film, and a notebook and pen to write down your thoughts or notes of encouragement to yourself, suggests the mental health charity.

Not feeling up to the task? Depression charity Blurt has created a self-care subscription box called The BuddyBox, which is full of mood-lifting treats and costs £21.50 a month. Each box contains at least five surprise products hand-picked to nourish, inspire and encourage self-care.

Keep active

It might be hard to find the motivation to keep fit – especially as the days get shorter and the temperature drops – but it’s really important to try and stick to an exercise regime if you can. As Dr Giuseppe explains: “Exercise is not only a great way to keep yourself fit and healthy but will also increase your overall mood from the endorphins being released during and after each session.”

You don’t have to do anything too strenuous – even moving your body once a day can help to alleviate a low mood, or feelings of lethargy and depression, he says. This could mean getting out each day for a brisk walk, even a run, or doing a bit of yoga. And with the nights drawing in, it might be best to schedule it in for first thing in the morning, or on your lunch break, rather than after work. 

Start or learn something new

If there’s one thing we learned during lockdown part one, it’s how to amuse ourselves. Keeping occupied with hobbies or learning new skills can help us take our mind off the bigger picture, which let’s face it, is pretty overwhelming. 

People will undoubtedly feel increased stress and anxiety over work and the possibility of redundancy in the coming months, says Dr Giuseppe. While there’s not much you can do about job security, there are ways to take control of other parts of your life, he says.

“Learning a new skill may help to keep you busy and your mind occupied, whether that is something you’re passionate about that you’ve never taken further or a new outdoor hobby such as cycling,” he says. “Taking up something which you can use to burn energy and keep yourself busy will really help with your long-term physical and mental health.”

It can be useful to set goals – and these can centre around your hobbies, too. That could be wanting to learn a certain amount of phrases in Spanish by Christmas, for example, or being able to run 10km non-stop by January.

Dr Claudia Pastides, also a Babylon GP, urges people to put their efforts into something productive which can help them feel good about themselves, whether that’s organising your cupboards, sorting your kitchen out, painting your front door, or upcycling and selling old furniture.

“All these things are positive tasks or hobbies that you can put your energy into and make you feel good at the end,” she says. “Motivation comes from inside us all. We are in charge of creating it and holding on to it.”

Do what you can to stay safe

Adopting Covid-19 safety measures can actually help people’s mental health, according to Penn State University research. Researchers surveyed participants between the ages of 18 and 90, measuring how much they felt the pandemic was affecting them financially, physically, socially and mentally; whether they were adhering to recommendations such as mask wearing; and what kinds of coping strategies they were using.

“Things like keeping a consistent schedule, reminding yourself that things will get better, finding activities to distract yourself, and taking care of others who need help are all helpful,” says Erina MacGeorge, professor of communication arts and sciences, of the most successful “forward-facing” strategies.

“Additionally, adhering to the national recommendations for protecting oneself from Covid-19, like hand-washing, social distancing and masking, was also associated with better mental health.”

“Sometimes we need to take a break from thinking about how we feel and do something to help alleviate the threat and make us feel a lot better about our situation in life,” says Jessica Myrick, associate professor of media studies.

“Covid-related messages that emphasise that even small actions are worthwhile might have the doubly positive effect of getting people to take small actions, like washing their hands more often, but also alleviate some mental strain, too.”

Structure your day

Humans are creatures of habit and we (understandably) like to feel in control, so sticking to a structure – where possible – can be incredibly stabilising. Planning your day out can also be helpful if you struggle with SAD.

“Try to maintain the same structure as you had back in the pre-quarantine days,” says Dr Giuseppe, noting that parents will likely find sticking to a daily routine much easier than just seeing how the days go. “When working from home, it can be tempting to fall into a bit of a lethargic lifestyle which could lead to negative thoughts and feelings of worthlessness,” he explains.

So, wake up early, change out of your pyjamas, do a bit of exercise and get into some comfy work clothes – maybe take a walk around the block to act as a faux commute, or make yourself a nice coffee to set you up for the day. Eating three balanced meals a day and sticking to a regular sleep routine is also crucial.

“Keeping your normal exercise routine is imperative and also making your work space separate from your living space should help you to separate your working day to your evening routine,” adds Dr Giuseppe.

Rethink your social circles

Another finding from Penn State’s research is that “social strain” – such as someone making demands, giving criticism, or simply getting on your nerves – is a strong and consistent predictor of mental health.

Yanmengqian Zhou, graduate assistant in communication arts and sciences, says: “This suggests that in difficult times like this, it could be particularly important to proactively structure our social networks in ways that minimise negative social experiences.”

Choose your friends wisely and don’t feel pressured to do anything you don’t want to do – these are challenging times and you need to be kind to yourself.

Another reason to focus on your friendship list is that both good and bad moods can be ‘picked up’ from friends, according to the University of Warwick.

Researchers found that having more friends who suffer worse moods is associated with a higher probability of an individual experiencing low moods and a decreased probability of them improving. The opposite applied to those who had a more positive social circle.

Don’t get too bogged down with the news

One  tip therapists and doctors swear by is not to overdo your exposure to news and keeping on top of all things Covid. “Avoid excessive watching of coronavirus coverage,” says Dr Giuseppe. “It’s good to keep up to date with what’s going on however watching the news reel 24/7 will likely have detrimental effects on your mental health and will cause your stress and anxiety levels to rise.

“You can’t change or fix what is happening so obsessing over the news will not help you get through the next six months. If you want to keep abreast of the news, limit it to one news update per day, or every few days.”

Keep your friends close and your pets closer

Pet owners know that animals can be a huge boost to mental health – and new research backs this up. 

The study, conducted from March to June this year by the University of York and the University of Lincoln, found that having a pet was linked to better mental health and reduced loneliness. More than 90% of respondents said their pet helped them cope emotionally with the lockdown and 96% said their pet helped keep them fit and active.

Co-author Professor Daniel Mills, from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln, says the research indicates how having a companion animal in your home can buffer against some of the psychological stress associated with lockdown. 

Lead author Dr Elena Ratschen, from the Department of Health Sciences at University of York, warned that people shouldn’t necessarily rush to acquire a pet during the pandemic. But for those who do own animals – especially those who adopted pets during lockdown – the finding will surely be of comfort.

Shift your thinking

It can be hard to stay positive when everything feels like it’s working against you, however there are some ways we can reframe our thinking to focus on the positives, rather than all the negatives.

“Maintain an attitude of curiosity about the world and practise gratitude, even for the small stuff,” says Wood. “At the end of each day, write down three things you’re grateful for, and at the start of each day write down three things you’re looking forward to.”

If you’re in an area under lockdown, rather than thinking “I’m stuck inside”, Dr Giuseppe suggests looking at it a different way – “I am stuck inside however I can use this time to work on myself and my passions.”

The first lockdown has left us more prepared, we now know what to expect, and we can use this knowledge to our advantage. “If there’s something you wanted to start but never had the time, then this could be the moment.”

Don’t be afraid to seek help

Sometimes no matter how hard we try, we can feel down or anxious, says Babylon GP Dr Claudia Pastides. 

If it gets to the point where every day is a struggle, this is the time to seek help. “Reach out to your GP, or a friend, and speak about how you’re feeling,” she says. “You won’t be alone in having those feelings and there is help available.”

Your GP should be able to offer more support and can also help with treatment options, which can include talking therapies or medication.

Dave Smithson, from Anxiety UK, urges people to surround themselves with a support network – and if you don’t have anyone in your life you feel comfortable talking to about how you feel, there are plenty of organisations out there, including mental health charities, as well as local peer-support groups.

“Talking to people and sharing your thoughts and feelings with others in similar situations can be really supportive,” he previously told HuffPost UK. “They understand what you’re going through and what you’re dealing with because they’re in the same boat.”

Useful websites and helplines

Mind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.

Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).

CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.

The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected]

Rethink Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0300 5000 927 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.

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Mary Jones 2019-11-06
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But the same batteries may still be able to function for many years longer, even as their capacity continues to go down and even if that function isn't sufficient for an electric vehicle.

In contrast to cars, grid-scale electricity storage isn't sensitive to either the amount of space taken up by batteries or their weight.

The batteries will eventually reach the point where they won't even make sense for grid storage, and the expected growth of electric vehicles means that the number of batteries being pulled from cars will increase dramatically over the next few decades.

And even now—long before there should be many at the end-of-life stage—the authors note that some lithium batteries have found their way into metal recycling facilities, where handling them inappropriately has set off fires.

So while it may not represent an urgent immediate need, developing the technology needed to handle immense quantities of lithium batteries will eventually be essential.

To begin with, they're all made in a limited number of formats; often, if a larger battery is needed, manufacturers will simply link up a number of standard-sized lead-acid batteries.

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Mary Jones 2019-08-30
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Most Fitbit devices automatically track your sleep with a combination of movement and heart-rate monitoring.

After syncing your Fitbit with the mobile app, you can review details about how you slept each day.

It tracks your sleep stages, such as light, heavy, and REM sleep, and lets you compare your sleep performance over time.

You can use your Fitbit sleep data to look for ways to improve your sleep performance, or monitor sleep for changes in your sleep that you may want to discuss with your doctor.

Most Fitbit activity monitors come with built-in sleep monitoring that works automatically — there's no need to tell your Fitbit you're going to bed, as it will just sense it.

If there's a heart rate monitor built into your Fitbit, it combines heart rate and movement data to develop a more accurate picture of your sleep cycle.

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Mary Jones 2021-04-13
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More than half of LGBTQ people who have been made homeless have been discriminated against or harassed by people who should be caring for them, according to a new report.

It was already known that LGBTQ people were disproportionately likely to end up homeless, but the report, by the youth charity AKT, reveals that almost a quarter (24%) of the homeless population are LGBTQ-identifying.

The charity surveyed 161 people who have recently experienced homelessness between the ages of 16 and 25, and half who answered said they had feared expressing their LGBTQ identity to family would lead to them being evicted.

Almost two thirds (61%) of LGBTQ people who had become homeless had first felt frightened or threatened by family, while 16% of those who responded to the survey had been forced into sexual acts by family members beforehand.

The findings of the AKT report, gathered over the past five years, paint a stark picture of queer youth homelessness in Britain.

Just one third of those surveyed said they felt safe to disclose their sexuality and gender identity when they approached services while homeless, while almost a fifth felt they had to have casual sex to find somewhere to stay.

In a joint statement, AKT’s chief executive Tim Sigsworth and chair Terry Stacy said: “We believe this report provides evidence for rethinking how organisations respond to supporting young LGBTQ+ people at risk of homelessness.”

They are calling for the “mandatory monitoring of gender and sexuality as a first vital step” for housing and homelessness charities, and a stronger focus on preventative interaction with those facing homelessness to limit its longterm effects. These include “poor mental health and perpetual journeys of abuse”, both of which came through strongly in the survey.

AKT is also urging better communication and referral pathways between specialist and mainstream services to “ensure the complex impacts of homelessness are addressed” and the collecting of homelessness data at a case level to be inclusive of gender diverse, trans and non-binary identities.

 

Evidence from AKT’s services nationally suggests disabled young people, trans young people and young people of colour who identify as LGBTQ are being even further disproportionately affected by discrimination. 

One such individual is Kayla, a 28-year-old trans woman from Birmingham, who accessed AKT’s services after she faced a hostile environment at home. After fearing she would be outed to her family while at university, Kayla dropped out and was offered a host family to live with by AKT.

However, after suffering issues with her mental health, she was forced to sleep rough before returning to a hostile environment at home, where her family wished for her to go through conversion therapy.

I’d already had that lack of acceptance from my family so I didn’t expect it from the services that were supposed to help me.Kayla, 28

When she reached out for help, Kayla experienced hostility from homelessness services. “I’d already had that lack of acceptance from my family so I didn’t expect it from the services that were supposed to help me,” she tells HuffPost UK. “I felt really alone. And more than anything I felt like I didn’t have a voice.”

Kayla has a chosen family around her now who support her and she hasn’t spoken to her biological family in six years. She has also started counselling. “Only now, having spoken about them more, do I realise how traumatic they were,” she says of her past experiences.

AKT say the government needs to create and adopt a strategy on LGBTQ youth homelessness that’s not only inclusive of people of colour, and trans and disabled people, but specific in its priorities for departments, for example ensuring the Home Office includes measures to support LGBTQ young people who have no recourse to public funds or who are seeking asylum.

The housing and homelessness sector also needs to commission training for staff to raise awareness of the needs and experiences of LGBTQ young people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, the charity said.

Kayla welcomes the report and its recommendations. “Now for the first time, a lot of queer young people are being listened to,” she says. “Our recommendations to improve support services by getting case workers that understand our challenges and look like us are being taken seriously.” 

Facing homelessness ? Help is available

The report revealed how less than half (44%) of people surveyed were aware of the housing support services AKT provides at the time they were last homeless. Almost one quarter (24%) weren’t aware of any support services available.

But the charity’s message – to people currently living in a hostile environment, facing one or currently homeless – is that help is there. If you have come out to a hostile response, you can access advice online or over the phone by emailing [email protected] or using the chat function on the AKT website.

HuffPost UK collaborated with AKT on a guide to seeking help if you’re LGBTQ and homeless or facing a hostile environment, which you can read here.

Kayla’s message to allies wanting to support young LGBTQ homeless people is: “Open your eyes as we are all around.” And when speaking to LGBTQ people who may be facing issues, “let them take the lead,” she adds.

“Meeting a lot of queer young people who had found themselves homeless I found one common denominator was a lack of understanding they felt came from people they’d come to contact with. Nobody was listening to them and their concerns fell on deaf ears.” 

Useful websites and helplines:

  • To report a rough sleeper call 0300 500 0914 or visit Streetlink
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Mary Jones 2020-08-03
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YouTube creator faces allegations from former housemates and members of the gaming community.
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Mary Jones 2019-09-30
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We spoke with sources who worked closely with the ousted WeWork CEO, Adam Neumann, and many told us about his habit of walking around barefoot.

Drinking tequila and yelling were also common, they said.

Business Insider talked to 20 people in an investigation into what it was like working under Neumann's leadership as he grew We into one of the world's most valuable startups.

Read the full story: Sex, tequila, and a tiger: Employees inside Adam Neumann's WeWork talk about the nonstop party to attain a $100 billion dream and the messy reality that tanked it

Read more WeWork news here.

He walks barefoot in the office, people close to him tell us.

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Mary Jones 2019-08-20
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While smaller gaming companies release a single sort of device, HP’s able to release three, and where one company can manage to hold down a single product line, HP is large enough to go in several directions at once.

The HP Pavilion Gaming Desktop (TG01-0185t) has Windows 10 Home and a 9th Generation Intel Core i7-9700 processor and 16 GB DDR4-2666 SDRAM, as well as an NVIDIA GeForce GTX GTX 1660 Ti graphics card.

There are 9 USB ports on this machine (4x USB 3.1 Gen 1, 4x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C) and a whole bunch of options if purchased with the ability to switch options, and it’s got just that TOUCH of LED lighting to make sure you know it’s made to play games.

There’s also a new HP Pavilion Gaming Keyboard 800 with 4-zone LED backlighting, a 3.5mm headphone jack, and “100% anti-ghosting” with n-key rollover.

A new HP Pavilion Gaming Laptop was revealed this week with model number 15-ec0010nr.

This machine has a 15.6-inch diagonal FHD IPS anti-glare micro-edge WLED-backlit display up front with an NVIDIA GTX 1050 inside, alongside an AMD Ryzen 5 3550H CPU.

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Mary Jones 2021-07-23
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Director Kate Herron discusses the interesting romance that develops in Marvel's latest Disney Plus series.
Mary Jones 2021-05-21
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Lady Gaga says she suffered a “total psychotic break” after being left pregnant by her rapist.

The Rain On Me singer features alongside Prince Harry and Oprah Winfrey in the Apple TV documentary series, The Me You Can’t See, which sees a number of stars discussing their mental health struggles.

Gaga says she was 19 when a producer threatened to burn her music if she did not take her clothes off.

Fighting back tears, the 35-year-old singer said: “And they didn’t stop asking me, and then I just froze, and I just – I don’t even remember.”

She said she cannot name her alleged attacker, adding: “I do not ever want to face that person again.”

Lady Gaga

Gaga, who first spoke publicly of being raped in 2014, described an incident years later when she went to hospital for acute pain and numbness and was surprised to be treated by a psychiatrist.

“First I felt full-on pain, then I went numb,” she said. “And then I was sick for weeks and weeks and weeks and weeks after, and I realised that it was the same pain that I felt when the person who raped me dropped me off pregnant on a corner, at my parents’ house because I was vomiting and sick.

“Because I’d been abused. I was locked away in a studio for months.”

The singer went on to discuss how trauma can change you as a person and she was not the same after being sexually assaulted.

“I had a total psychotic break, and for a couple years, I was not the same girl,” she said.

“The way that I feel when I feel pain was how I felt after I was raped.

“I’ve had so many MRIs and scans where they don’t find nothing. But your body remembers.”

Gaga said she has felt like “there’s a black cloud that is following you wherever you go telling you that you are worthless and should die”.

And discussing her self-harm, she said: “You know why it’s not good to cut? You know why it’s not good to throw yourself against the wall? You know why it’s not good to self-harm? Because it makes you feel worse. You think you’re going to feel better because you’re showing somebody, ‘Look, I’m in pain’. It doesn’t help.

“I always tell people, ‘tell somebody, don’t show somebody.’”

Gaga described the improvement of her mental health as “a slow rise” but warned it was not a “straight line”.

She said: “Even if I have six brilliant months, all it takes is getting triggered once to feel bad. And when I say feel bad, I mean want to cut, think about dying, wondering if I’m ever gonna do it.”

The chart-topping singer said she gradually learned how to cope with unwanted and damaging emotions, but it was a slow process that took two-and-a-half years.

Asked what she was doing during that time, Gaga quipped: “I won an Oscar.”

She won best original song in 2019 for Shallow, a track from A Star Is Born.

The Me You Can’t See is streaming on Apple TV+ now.

  • Rape Crisis services for women and girls who have been raped or have experienced sexual violence - 0808 802 9999
  • Survivors UK offers support for men and boys - 0203 598 3898
Mary Jones 2021-03-01
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With this thin microfluidic patch and an app, you’ll know if you’re staying hydrated
Mary Jones 2020-09-30
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Feeling blue? You’re not alone. The Covid-19 pandemic has had clear repercussions for mental health, with some people impacted more than others. A study published in the Lancet journal comparing our mental health in April 2019 to this year found the prevalence of “clinically significant” levels of mental distress have risen from 18.9% to 27.3%. Increases were greatest among 18- to 34-year-olds, women and people living with young children.

With local lockdowns coming back into effect across parts of the UK, more people are once again confined to their homes without social contact, and many of us are experiencing an overwhelming sense of déjà vu. 

Dr Niall Campbell, psychiatrist and consultant at the Priory hospital in Roehampton, is also worried about the impact of what he calls “Covid burnout” on the generation of women, mostly aged 50-60, who are “sandwiched” between jobs, a dependent child and an adult relative who requires care.

Many people are working long hours through fear of losing their job and because days and nights are blurring into one, he adds – and alcohol can become a crutch for some when there’s an absence of support. “Long hours generally mean less sleep, poorer diet, less exercise, more stress, feeling you are constantly ‘on’ and having to prove yourself,” he says.

On top of that, as autumn turns to winter, some of us are facing down the prospect of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which sees roughly one in 15 in the UK hit with feelings of lethargy and depression on a life-altering scale. 

So, how can you keep your head above water in the months ahead? Thankfully, there are ways. With lockdown part two on the cards, here’s your ultimate self-care toolkit for staying buoyant in the months ahead.

Take your annual leave, even if you stay home

Current local lockdown and quarantine restrictions make planning hard, but taking leave is crucial right now – even if the only place you go is your living room.

Dr Gary Wood, author of The Psychology of Wellbeing (out in October), says a well-earned break is crucial for us to reflect and plan. “When we relax, we access the full range of higher-level functions such as problem-solving and planning,” he says. “But over the pandemic, we might have not had the time out to stock-take and plan.”

If you can’t go anywhere, Wood recommends creating a mini-break or spa day at home. Stuck for ideas of what to do? Holistic health and lifestyle coach Milla Lascelles previously shared her top tips with HuffPost UK.

Keep in touch with loved ones

“News of tightening of social measures to combat the rising number of Covid-19 infections will be making the winter months ahead look even darker for many people,” says Dr Keith Grimes, a GP for online doctor service Babylon. 

Feelings of sadness are understandable, he notes, but know that we have learned a huge amount about how to reduce the spread of this illness and treat it successfully. So it’s not all doom and gloom.

During this time it’s important to stay in touch with friends and family, he says. If you live alone, it’s worth bubbling up with another household so you can spend time with them. And if you can’t see others, it might help to schedule regular FaceTime conversations or phone calls with your nearest and dearest.

Dr Aragona Giuseppe, a GP and medical advisor for Prescription Doctor, says calling friends and family will not only lift you, but also be a lovely surprise for the other person. “We may not be able to meet all our friends at the pub, but a Zoom call or a phone call should help to boost your mood and remind you what’s waiting at the end of this lockdown.”

Social media can be useful for keeping in touch with others however it should complement phone calls and face-to-face chats, rather than replace them.

Plan time to enjoy yourself

We might be stuck at home day in, day out but that doesn’t mean you can’t plan smaller activities to look forward to – whether that’s a trip to the coast for a blast of fresh air and a long walk, a night away from home in a hotel, or a visit to that restaurant you’ve been meaning to check out for some time.

“Make sure you plan time to enjoy yourself, exercise, and get outside in nature and experience the change of the seasons in person,” advises Dr Grimes.

Failing that, why not treat yourself to a pamper day? Hair salons, massage parlours and nail bars are still open and in need of your support.

Create a self-care box

One of Mind’s top tips for people with SAD is to fill a box with things that comfort you or help you to relax – also known as a self-care box.

Try including your favourite book or film, and a notebook and pen to write down your thoughts or notes of encouragement to yourself, suggests the mental health charity.

Not feeling up to the task? Depression charity Blurt has created a self-care subscription box called The BuddyBox, which is full of mood-lifting treats and costs £21.50 a month. Each box contains at least five surprise products hand-picked to nourish, inspire and encourage self-care.

Keep active

It might be hard to find the motivation to keep fit – especially as the days get shorter and the temperature drops – but it’s really important to try and stick to an exercise regime if you can. As Dr Giuseppe explains: “Exercise is not only a great way to keep yourself fit and healthy but will also increase your overall mood from the endorphins being released during and after each session.”

You don’t have to do anything too strenuous – even moving your body once a day can help to alleviate a low mood, or feelings of lethargy and depression, he says. This could mean getting out each day for a brisk walk, even a run, or doing a bit of yoga. And with the nights drawing in, it might be best to schedule it in for first thing in the morning, or on your lunch break, rather than after work. 

Start or learn something new

If there’s one thing we learned during lockdown part one, it’s how to amuse ourselves. Keeping occupied with hobbies or learning new skills can help us take our mind off the bigger picture, which let’s face it, is pretty overwhelming. 

People will undoubtedly feel increased stress and anxiety over work and the possibility of redundancy in the coming months, says Dr Giuseppe. While there’s not much you can do about job security, there are ways to take control of other parts of your life, he says.

“Learning a new skill may help to keep you busy and your mind occupied, whether that is something you’re passionate about that you’ve never taken further or a new outdoor hobby such as cycling,” he says. “Taking up something which you can use to burn energy and keep yourself busy will really help with your long-term physical and mental health.”

It can be useful to set goals – and these can centre around your hobbies, too. That could be wanting to learn a certain amount of phrases in Spanish by Christmas, for example, or being able to run 10km non-stop by January.

Dr Claudia Pastides, also a Babylon GP, urges people to put their efforts into something productive which can help them feel good about themselves, whether that’s organising your cupboards, sorting your kitchen out, painting your front door, or upcycling and selling old furniture.

“All these things are positive tasks or hobbies that you can put your energy into and make you feel good at the end,” she says. “Motivation comes from inside us all. We are in charge of creating it and holding on to it.”

Do what you can to stay safe

Adopting Covid-19 safety measures can actually help people’s mental health, according to Penn State University research. Researchers surveyed participants between the ages of 18 and 90, measuring how much they felt the pandemic was affecting them financially, physically, socially and mentally; whether they were adhering to recommendations such as mask wearing; and what kinds of coping strategies they were using.

“Things like keeping a consistent schedule, reminding yourself that things will get better, finding activities to distract yourself, and taking care of others who need help are all helpful,” says Erina MacGeorge, professor of communication arts and sciences, of the most successful “forward-facing” strategies.

“Additionally, adhering to the national recommendations for protecting oneself from Covid-19, like hand-washing, social distancing and masking, was also associated with better mental health.”

“Sometimes we need to take a break from thinking about how we feel and do something to help alleviate the threat and make us feel a lot better about our situation in life,” says Jessica Myrick, associate professor of media studies.

“Covid-related messages that emphasise that even small actions are worthwhile might have the doubly positive effect of getting people to take small actions, like washing their hands more often, but also alleviate some mental strain, too.”

Structure your day

Humans are creatures of habit and we (understandably) like to feel in control, so sticking to a structure – where possible – can be incredibly stabilising. Planning your day out can also be helpful if you struggle with SAD.

“Try to maintain the same structure as you had back in the pre-quarantine days,” says Dr Giuseppe, noting that parents will likely find sticking to a daily routine much easier than just seeing how the days go. “When working from home, it can be tempting to fall into a bit of a lethargic lifestyle which could lead to negative thoughts and feelings of worthlessness,” he explains.

So, wake up early, change out of your pyjamas, do a bit of exercise and get into some comfy work clothes – maybe take a walk around the block to act as a faux commute, or make yourself a nice coffee to set you up for the day. Eating three balanced meals a day and sticking to a regular sleep routine is also crucial.

“Keeping your normal exercise routine is imperative and also making your work space separate from your living space should help you to separate your working day to your evening routine,” adds Dr Giuseppe.

Rethink your social circles

Another finding from Penn State’s research is that “social strain” – such as someone making demands, giving criticism, or simply getting on your nerves – is a strong and consistent predictor of mental health.

Yanmengqian Zhou, graduate assistant in communication arts and sciences, says: “This suggests that in difficult times like this, it could be particularly important to proactively structure our social networks in ways that minimise negative social experiences.”

Choose your friends wisely and don’t feel pressured to do anything you don’t want to do – these are challenging times and you need to be kind to yourself.

Another reason to focus on your friendship list is that both good and bad moods can be ‘picked up’ from friends, according to the University of Warwick.

Researchers found that having more friends who suffer worse moods is associated with a higher probability of an individual experiencing low moods and a decreased probability of them improving. The opposite applied to those who had a more positive social circle.

Don’t get too bogged down with the news

One  tip therapists and doctors swear by is not to overdo your exposure to news and keeping on top of all things Covid. “Avoid excessive watching of coronavirus coverage,” says Dr Giuseppe. “It’s good to keep up to date with what’s going on however watching the news reel 24/7 will likely have detrimental effects on your mental health and will cause your stress and anxiety levels to rise.

“You can’t change or fix what is happening so obsessing over the news will not help you get through the next six months. If you want to keep abreast of the news, limit it to one news update per day, or every few days.”

Keep your friends close and your pets closer

Pet owners know that animals can be a huge boost to mental health – and new research backs this up. 

The study, conducted from March to June this year by the University of York and the University of Lincoln, found that having a pet was linked to better mental health and reduced loneliness. More than 90% of respondents said their pet helped them cope emotionally with the lockdown and 96% said their pet helped keep them fit and active.

Co-author Professor Daniel Mills, from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln, says the research indicates how having a companion animal in your home can buffer against some of the psychological stress associated with lockdown. 

Lead author Dr Elena Ratschen, from the Department of Health Sciences at University of York, warned that people shouldn’t necessarily rush to acquire a pet during the pandemic. But for those who do own animals – especially those who adopted pets during lockdown – the finding will surely be of comfort.

Shift your thinking

It can be hard to stay positive when everything feels like it’s working against you, however there are some ways we can reframe our thinking to focus on the positives, rather than all the negatives.

“Maintain an attitude of curiosity about the world and practise gratitude, even for the small stuff,” says Wood. “At the end of each day, write down three things you’re grateful for, and at the start of each day write down three things you’re looking forward to.”

If you’re in an area under lockdown, rather than thinking “I’m stuck inside”, Dr Giuseppe suggests looking at it a different way – “I am stuck inside however I can use this time to work on myself and my passions.”

The first lockdown has left us more prepared, we now know what to expect, and we can use this knowledge to our advantage. “If there’s something you wanted to start but never had the time, then this could be the moment.”

Don’t be afraid to seek help

Sometimes no matter how hard we try, we can feel down or anxious, says Babylon GP Dr Claudia Pastides. 

If it gets to the point where every day is a struggle, this is the time to seek help. “Reach out to your GP, or a friend, and speak about how you’re feeling,” she says. “You won’t be alone in having those feelings and there is help available.”

Your GP should be able to offer more support and can also help with treatment options, which can include talking therapies or medication.

Dave Smithson, from Anxiety UK, urges people to surround themselves with a support network – and if you don’t have anyone in your life you feel comfortable talking to about how you feel, there are plenty of organisations out there, including mental health charities, as well as local peer-support groups.

“Talking to people and sharing your thoughts and feelings with others in similar situations can be really supportive,” he previously told HuffPost UK. “They understand what you’re going through and what you’re dealing with because they’re in the same boat.”

Useful websites and helplines

Mind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.

Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).

CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.

The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected]

Rethink Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0300 5000 927 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.

Mary Jones 2020-07-31
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A heap of gems can be found on Amazon. Let's round them up.
Mary Jones 2019-11-06
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But the same batteries may still be able to function for many years longer, even as their capacity continues to go down and even if that function isn't sufficient for an electric vehicle.

In contrast to cars, grid-scale electricity storage isn't sensitive to either the amount of space taken up by batteries or their weight.

The batteries will eventually reach the point where they won't even make sense for grid storage, and the expected growth of electric vehicles means that the number of batteries being pulled from cars will increase dramatically over the next few decades.

And even now—long before there should be many at the end-of-life stage—the authors note that some lithium batteries have found their way into metal recycling facilities, where handling them inappropriately has set off fires.

So while it may not represent an urgent immediate need, developing the technology needed to handle immense quantities of lithium batteries will eventually be essential.

To begin with, they're all made in a limited number of formats; often, if a larger battery is needed, manufacturers will simply link up a number of standard-sized lead-acid batteries.

Mary Jones 2019-09-21
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The debate over the police using machine learning is intensifying – it is considered in some quarters as controversial as stop and search.

It has been heavily criticized for being discriminatory towards black and minority ethnic groups, and for having marginal effects on reducing crime.

In the same way, the police use of machine learning algorithms has been condemned by human rights groups who claim such programs encourage racial profiling and discrimination along with threatening privacy and freedom of expression.

Broadly speaking, machine learning uses data to teach computers to make decisions without explicitly instructing them how to do it.

Machine learning is used successfully in many industries to create efficiency, prioritize risk and improve decision making.

It is true that there are potential issues with any use of probabilistic machine learning algorithms in policing.

Mary Jones 2019-08-30
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Most Fitbit devices automatically track your sleep with a combination of movement and heart-rate monitoring.

After syncing your Fitbit with the mobile app, you can review details about how you slept each day.

It tracks your sleep stages, such as light, heavy, and REM sleep, and lets you compare your sleep performance over time.

You can use your Fitbit sleep data to look for ways to improve your sleep performance, or monitor sleep for changes in your sleep that you may want to discuss with your doctor.

Most Fitbit activity monitors come with built-in sleep monitoring that works automatically — there's no need to tell your Fitbit you're going to bed, as it will just sense it.

If there's a heart rate monitor built into your Fitbit, it combines heart rate and movement data to develop a more accurate picture of your sleep cycle.

Mary Jones 2021-07-20
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Seven in 10 disabled women say they have been sexually harassed at work, increasing to almost eight in 10 among those aged 18 to 34. 

These shocking statistics, which compare to 52% of women in general, are from a new report published by the the TUC that surveyed 2,003 disabled women about their careers. Of those, 1,162 respondents agreed to answer questions about their experiences of sexual harassment at work.

It’s been more than four years since the #MeToo movement took over our social media feeds, but this is the first major study into the sexual harassment of disabled women at work in Great Britain. As the report highlights, “the voices and experiences of disabled women have too infrequently been highlighted”. 

Common experiences shared by those surveyed included unwanted sexual advances (38%), unwanted touching (36%), and unwanted sexual touching/sexual assault (18%). 

One in 25 said they had experienced a serious sexual assault or rape at work. 

The research also suggests that many disabled women experience multiple forms of harassment in the workplace, with more than half of respondents (54%) saying they had experienced two or more types of sexually harassing behaviour, and 45% saying they had experienced three or more. “This points to workplace cultures where sexual harassment is a frequent and normalised occurrence rather than an isolated incident,” the authors said. 

The report identified great hesitancy among disabled women in reporting harassment at work. Two thirds (67%) of those who had experienced it did not report the harassment to their boss the most recent time it happened, with 39% saying this was because they did not believe they would be taken seriously.

Some said they were worried it would have a negative impact on their career or work relationships. Other reasons included not thinking they would be believed or thinking they would be blamed if they reported the incident.

And unfortunately, of those who did report the most recent instance of sexual harassment, more than half (53%) said it was not dealt with satisfactorily.

Unsurprisingly, this is having a huge impact on the wellbeing of women. 

Around one in three (34%) of those who disclosed harassment in the survey said their experiences had a negative impact on their mental health and more than one in five (21%) said it negatively affected their relationships with colleagues.

The experiences caused one in eight (12%) to leave their job or employer entirely. This is particularly troubling given disabled women already face significant barriers to getting into work and getting paid the same as non-disabled workers.

TUC research in October 2020 found that disabled women earned 36% less than non-disabled men. The analysis also found a huge unemployment gap; disabled women were 32.6% more likely to be unemployed when compared to non-disabled men. 

“Four years on from the explosion of #MeToo on a global scale, employers still aren’t doing enough to make sure women are safe at work. It’s time for every employer to take responsibility for protecting their staff from sexual harassment,” said TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady.

“Ministers must change the law to make employers protect workers from sexual harassment specifically, and from all forms of harassment by customers and clients. Anyone worried about sexual harassment at work should get in touch with their union.” 

Useful helplines and websites:

Mary Jones 2021-04-13
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More than half of LGBTQ people who have been made homeless have been discriminated against or harassed by people who should be caring for them, according to a new report.

It was already known that LGBTQ people were disproportionately likely to end up homeless, but the report, by the youth charity AKT, reveals that almost a quarter (24%) of the homeless population are LGBTQ-identifying.

The charity surveyed 161 people who have recently experienced homelessness between the ages of 16 and 25, and half who answered said they had feared expressing their LGBTQ identity to family would lead to them being evicted.

Almost two thirds (61%) of LGBTQ people who had become homeless had first felt frightened or threatened by family, while 16% of those who responded to the survey had been forced into sexual acts by family members beforehand.

The findings of the AKT report, gathered over the past five years, paint a stark picture of queer youth homelessness in Britain.

Just one third of those surveyed said they felt safe to disclose their sexuality and gender identity when they approached services while homeless, while almost a fifth felt they had to have casual sex to find somewhere to stay.

In a joint statement, AKT’s chief executive Tim Sigsworth and chair Terry Stacy said: “We believe this report provides evidence for rethinking how organisations respond to supporting young LGBTQ+ people at risk of homelessness.”

They are calling for the “mandatory monitoring of gender and sexuality as a first vital step” for housing and homelessness charities, and a stronger focus on preventative interaction with those facing homelessness to limit its longterm effects. These include “poor mental health and perpetual journeys of abuse”, both of which came through strongly in the survey.

AKT is also urging better communication and referral pathways between specialist and mainstream services to “ensure the complex impacts of homelessness are addressed” and the collecting of homelessness data at a case level to be inclusive of gender diverse, trans and non-binary identities.

 

Evidence from AKT’s services nationally suggests disabled young people, trans young people and young people of colour who identify as LGBTQ are being even further disproportionately affected by discrimination. 

One such individual is Kayla, a 28-year-old trans woman from Birmingham, who accessed AKT’s services after she faced a hostile environment at home. After fearing she would be outed to her family while at university, Kayla dropped out and was offered a host family to live with by AKT.

However, after suffering issues with her mental health, she was forced to sleep rough before returning to a hostile environment at home, where her family wished for her to go through conversion therapy.

I’d already had that lack of acceptance from my family so I didn’t expect it from the services that were supposed to help me.Kayla, 28

When she reached out for help, Kayla experienced hostility from homelessness services. “I’d already had that lack of acceptance from my family so I didn’t expect it from the services that were supposed to help me,” she tells HuffPost UK. “I felt really alone. And more than anything I felt like I didn’t have a voice.”

Kayla has a chosen family around her now who support her and she hasn’t spoken to her biological family in six years. She has also started counselling. “Only now, having spoken about them more, do I realise how traumatic they were,” she says of her past experiences.

AKT say the government needs to create and adopt a strategy on LGBTQ youth homelessness that’s not only inclusive of people of colour, and trans and disabled people, but specific in its priorities for departments, for example ensuring the Home Office includes measures to support LGBTQ young people who have no recourse to public funds or who are seeking asylum.

The housing and homelessness sector also needs to commission training for staff to raise awareness of the needs and experiences of LGBTQ young people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, the charity said.

Kayla welcomes the report and its recommendations. “Now for the first time, a lot of queer young people are being listened to,” she says. “Our recommendations to improve support services by getting case workers that understand our challenges and look like us are being taken seriously.” 

Facing homelessness ? Help is available

The report revealed how less than half (44%) of people surveyed were aware of the housing support services AKT provides at the time they were last homeless. Almost one quarter (24%) weren’t aware of any support services available.

But the charity’s message – to people currently living in a hostile environment, facing one or currently homeless – is that help is there. If you have come out to a hostile response, you can access advice online or over the phone by emailing [email protected]kt.org.uk or using the chat function on the AKT website.

HuffPost UK collaborated with AKT on a guide to seeking help if you’re LGBTQ and homeless or facing a hostile environment, which you can read here.

Kayla’s message to allies wanting to support young LGBTQ homeless people is: “Open your eyes as we are all around.” And when speaking to LGBTQ people who may be facing issues, “let them take the lead,” she adds.

“Meeting a lot of queer young people who had found themselves homeless I found one common denominator was a lack of understanding they felt came from people they’d come to contact with. Nobody was listening to them and their concerns fell on deaf ears.” 

Useful websites and helplines:

  • To report a rough sleeper call 0300 500 0914 or visit Streetlink
Mary Jones 2020-10-07
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Outdoor Voices designed workout wear called TechSweat specifically built for sweaty, high-intensity workouts. Here's what we thought after testing its leggings.
Mary Jones 2020-08-03
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YouTube creator faces allegations from former housemates and members of the gaming community.
Mary Jones 2020-07-24
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Amazon baldking Jeff Bezos added $13 billion to his net worth earlier this week, quite simply a stupid amount of wealth for just one person to acquire in one day — billionaire chief exec or otherwise. And so, one Twitter account is hilariously posing a very poignant question: has Jeff Bezos decided to end world hunger? @HasBezosDecided’s bio cites a report from the Institute of Food Policy Research Institute that found that solving world hunger by 2030 would cost $11 billion in extra spending each year. Every day, the account confirms whether Bezos has bothered to contribute what represents a small fraction…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Amazon,Twitter
Mary Jones 2019-09-30
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We spoke with sources who worked closely with the ousted WeWork CEO, Adam Neumann, and many told us about his habit of walking around barefoot.

Drinking tequila and yelling were also common, they said.

Business Insider talked to 20 people in an investigation into what it was like working under Neumann's leadership as he grew We into one of the world's most valuable startups.

Read the full story: Sex, tequila, and a tiger: Employees inside Adam Neumann's WeWork talk about the nonstop party to attain a $100 billion dream and the messy reality that tanked it

Read more WeWork news here.

He walks barefoot in the office, people close to him tell us.

Mary Jones 2019-09-21

People liked the concept of not having to carry their flagship smartphones during their training, outdoor activities or even places where carrying an expensive smartphone is risky.

Zeblaze is a Chinese company founded in 2014 in Shenzhen, China.

In the past 5 years the company has managed to join the smartwatch industry leaders by having exceptional best-sellers with outstanding quality and competitive pricing.

Smart Watch Mode utilizes a MediaTek SoC to provide an excellent 4G smartwatch mode, where the watch can be used with or without a smartphone synced in.

Zeblaze THOR 5 – Specifications

Dial material: Case Material – Zinc alloy, Strap Material – Silicone

Mary Jones 2019-08-20
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While smaller gaming companies release a single sort of device, HP’s able to release three, and where one company can manage to hold down a single product line, HP is large enough to go in several directions at once.

The HP Pavilion Gaming Desktop (TG01-0185t) has Windows 10 Home and a 9th Generation Intel Core i7-9700 processor and 16 GB DDR4-2666 SDRAM, as well as an NVIDIA GeForce GTX GTX 1660 Ti graphics card.

There are 9 USB ports on this machine (4x USB 3.1 Gen 1, 4x USB 2.0, 1x USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C) and a whole bunch of options if purchased with the ability to switch options, and it’s got just that TOUCH of LED lighting to make sure you know it’s made to play games.

There’s also a new HP Pavilion Gaming Keyboard 800 with 4-zone LED backlighting, a 3.5mm headphone jack, and “100% anti-ghosting” with n-key rollover.

A new HP Pavilion Gaming Laptop was revealed this week with model number 15-ec0010nr.

This machine has a 15.6-inch diagonal FHD IPS anti-glare micro-edge WLED-backlit display up front with an NVIDIA GTX 1050 inside, alongside an AMD Ryzen 5 3550H CPU.