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Matt Ouellette 2021-07-27
Activision Blizzard logo
Photo Illustration by Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Activison Blizzard employees are staging a walkout on Wednesday, July 28th in response to the company’s handling of sexual harassment allegations brought by the state of California. Employees will meet outside Blizzard’s main campus in Irvine at 10AM PST. “We believe that our values as employees are not being accurately reflected in the words and actions of our leadership,” the organizers said in a statement.

The news comes after California sued the renowned gaming studio and its publisher, saying women were subjected to constant sexual harassment and discrimination at work. One female employee allegedly died by suicide after having nude photos of her passed around the office. Following the suit, numerous employees took to Twitter to...

Continue reading…

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Matt Ouellette 2021-06-25
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Sending billionaires into space is "ground zero for everything that is right and wrong with society - we should focus on the planet we already have."
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Matt Ouellette 2021-05-27
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More than a million IVF cycles and 260,000 donor insemination cycles have been performed in the UK since 1991 – but the picture of who is having this treatment has changed massively in the past three decades.

That’s according to a new report from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), which show 390,000 babies have been born from fertility treatment in that time – and more of them to single women, lesbian couples and women over 40 than ever.

The report also shows the meaningful medical advances in fertility treatment over the past 30 years, while highlighting the difficulties faced by individuals and couples accessing treatment across the country – echoing recent HuffPost UK investigations into the IVF postcode lottery.

5 Key Facts From The Report

1. More same-sex couples are having IVF

In 2019, 2,435 IVF cycles (4% of all cycles) involved a female partner – this is four times the 489 cycles in 2009.

2. More single women are having IVF

In 2019, 1,470 cycles (2%) involved no partner, compared to 565 in 2009 (1%).

3. More forty-somethings are having IVF

The proportion of IVF cycles undertaken by patients aged 40 and over has more than doubled from 10% (689 cycles) in 1991 to 21% (14,761 cycles) in 2019.

4. There really is an NHS postcode lottery

The level of NHS funding for fertility treatment varies across the UK, with 62% of cycles funded by the NHS in Scotland in 2019, falling to 20% in some parts of England.

5. But IVF has rising success rates

The report concludes that advances in technology and treatment over the past three decades have resulted in more successful outcomes, with birth rates for all patients under 43 improving year on year. In 1991 patients aged 35-37 had a live birth rate per embryo transferred of 6%, increasing to 25% in 2019.

Sarah Norcross, director of the fertility charity the Progress Educational Trust (PET), previously told HuffPost UK that it’s a positive move women have the choice to become mothers alone, but it’s a common misconception that women are delaying motherhood just to focus on careers. 

“Research suggests it is the lack of a male partner prepared to commit to parenthood that is the key driver for women choosing to become single mothers,” she said. 

“These are not women focused solely on their career and they are not necessarily women who have failed to find the man they want to have children with – it is the absence of a man ready to become a dad that has led to this reproductive choice.” 

Commenting on the latest report, she added that the number of same-sex female couples wishing to access fertility treatment shows how “the routes to family formation are changing,” – and adds that the NICE guidelines on same-sex fertility treatment should be updated to reflect this.

“The current situation, where same sex couples have to pay for six attempts at a pregnancy before they can access treatment, is unfair and needs to change,” she said.  

“The HFEA’s 2019 report also highlights the harsh reality of more than half a decade of cuts to NHS-funded fertility services in England, with potentially more to come later this year in the north London area. It is shocking that the East of England is now the worst place to live in the UK, with just 20% of treatment funded, when nearly a decade ago it was the best place to live.” 

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Matt Ouellette 2021-01-15
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The online encyclopedia is an unlikely beacon of reliability.
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Matt Ouellette 2021-07-14
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(University of California - Santa Barbara) UC Santa Barbara chemical engineering professor Michelle O'Malley has been named the recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) 2021 Allan P. Colburn Award. The award, named for a legendary professor who founded the University of Delaware chemical engineering department, recognizes significant contributions to chemical engineering through publications by younger members of the institute.
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Matt Ouellette 2021-06-24
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A graphic that simply said "Q" was posted on McAfee's account after McAfee's death in a Spanish jail was announced.
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0
Matt Ouellette 2021-05-15
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Commentary: FPS Boost is incredible, but I'm still not completely satisfied with framerates on the Series S.
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Matt Ouellette 2020-12-28
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Need some help picking your next wearable? We've put together a guide to the best Android smartwatches for 2020.
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Matt Ouellette 2021-07-09
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This week we discuss the proliferation of ebikes in bike-share networks, as well as the explosive growth of private ebike ownership.
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0
Matt Ouellette 2021-06-17
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Dealmaster also has early Prime Day discounts, Philips Hue deals, and more.
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Matt Ouellette 2021-03-11
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When people learn that I’m in a polyamorous three-way relationship, or throuple, they understandably have questions.

But these questions aren’t the same questions you’d ask someone in a two-way relationship, questions like what’s their name? What do they do? Where did you meet? Instead, I get asked things like: so, do you always have threesomes? Which partner is your favourite? Do you all sleep in the same bed? 

These questions are harmless, even funny. I admit relationships like mine are still far from the norm, and I don’t mind answering them when people are just trying to understand how polyamory works.

Couples are the norm, represented in complex and honest ways in millions of movies, TV shows and books. I’ve yet to see a single good representation of polyamory in film or on TV. So it makes sense that when people ask questions about polyamory, they’re doing it through a filter that places traditional monogamy as the default.

But there’s one question that’s more problematic. “How can you be a feminist in that relationship?”

To unpack this, I need to give some context. I have been with my male partner, Paul, for eight years. We met Andrea just over a year ago. People encountering our female, female, male dynamic assume Paul is getting the most out of it.

They imagine him swaggering down the road with a woman under each arm. They imagine a non-stop orgy (one that’s flatteringly lit and airbrushed like mainstream porn). They assume the dynamic was his idea. They assume Andrea and I aren’t really into each other, that we’re both just doing it for his male approval – or that Andrea is trying to ‘steal’ him from me. 

Granted, my relationship throws these things into extreme relief. But these prejudices harm all kinds of relationships, as well as people who are single. 

Take the common misconception that Andrea wants to ‘steal’ Paul away from me. This assumes that a relationship (and most especially a monogamous two-person relationship) is the ultimate social success. That a person (but especially a woman) must be looking to couple-up, because otherwise they’re kind of failing at life. Anyone who’s felt depressed to be single on Valentine’s Day, or read an article about ‘cuffing season’ has probably felt this pressure. 

But not all women want relationships. We’re not more valid with a partner (or indeed partners). And we’re definitely not out to defeat one another in some kind of relationship Hunger Games.

Or take the assumption that Paul is somehow getting more out of our dynamic. This inherently positions Paul’s male experience as somehow more valid, and worth more, than a woman’s experience. It also plays into the scientifically disproven idea that men want sex more than women, as well as the disturbingly too common belief that bisexuality is not real

These assumptions harm all of us because they reaffirm misogynistic biases that put male experiences, and male preferences, first. It also suggests, quite offensively, that women like me and Andrea are essentially doormats incapable of making active choices about our relationships and our lives.

The first time a friend asked me how I can be a feminist in this relationship, I hadn’t thought so deeply about all this. I brought a whole bunch of assumptions to the table myself.

We’re definitely not out to defeat one another in some kind of relationship Hunger Games.

“No no no, it’s not like that,” I said instantly. I could have asked her to clarify, to explain what she meant, but I didn’t need to. I knew exactly what she meant – because her assumptions are the default. Rarely challenged, rarely even acknowledged. And that’s what makes them so pernicious. 

I explained to my friend that we are three people in a relationship. Three consenting adults who are open and honest with one another. Not two women being strung along by a man. Not a couple using another woman like a human sex toy. Not a couple that’s about to be split up by some kind of reality TV-style femme fatale.

The most worrying part is that my friend is someone who already gets this stuff. Polyamory wasn’t a shocking new concept to her, she understands feminism and gender and the idea of internalised misogyny. And that’s how powerful these prejudices are. They get into our heads even when we think we’ve overcome them.

The only way we can keep our prejudices in check is by acknowledging them and asking ourselves where they come from, and whether that’s something we really believe. Now, when people ask me “How can you be feminist in that relationship?” I ask a question of my own: “Why not?”

So, in fact, please do keep asking this question. But get ready to come up with the answer yourself.

Abby Moss is a freelance journalist. Follow her on Twitter @mossabigail

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

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Matt Ouellette 2020-10-22
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COVID-19 can't kill Apple's ceremonial iPhone launches, as dozens lined up for the iPhone 12 launch in Sydney, Australia.
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Matt Ouellette 2021-07-05
img
Trump wondered how Pence "could be such a 'stiff' and a 'square,'" Michael Wolff wrote in his new book.
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Matt Ouellette 2021-06-12
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Microsoft Edge browser game gives procrastinators yet another weapon for the arsenal.
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Matt Ouellette 2021-01-31
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The audio-only app is capturing attention and readying for expansion.
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Matt Ouellette 2020-09-15
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A 10-year-old drummer from Ipswich is fast on her way to achieving Rock God status.

Nandi Bushell – who you might recognise from last year’s Argos Christmas advert – took part in an epic drum-off with Dave Grohl to the song ‘Dead End Friends’ by his band, Them Crooked Vultures. And he was so impressed by her performance, he’s written a superhero theme tune especially for her.

Following their battle last week, Nandi said it was an “honour” to be able to drum with “the most awesome, fun, kind and legendary Dave Grohl”.

When Grohl declared she’d won the battle, he tweeted a hint that there was more to come: “You win round one... but it ain’t over yet! Buckle up, cuz I have something special in mind.”

And he didn’t disappoint. On Monday, he shared a video on the Foo Fighters Twitter account of him singing a song that he’d written and performed especially for Nandi – or, as Grohl describes her, “the number one drummer girl, the best drummer in the world”.

“Every superhero needs a theme song,” Grohl tweeted to the 10-year-old. “Here’s one for you!”

Not one to hide his talents, Grohl can be seen singing, drumming and playing guitar in the track, while his daughters (the Grohlettes) provide backing vocals, singing Nandi’s name throughout.

The song describes how Nandi is “always right on time” and a “hero wunderkind”.

“She’s got the power, she’s got the sound,” Grohl sings. “Nandi on the drums makes the world go round.”

Nandi was absolutely thrilled by the tune and can be seen clutching her face, wide-eyed and awestruck, as she watches Grohl perform.

“I can’t believe Mr. Grohl wrote a song about me!?!” she tweeted. “This is so so so #EPIC!! I think it’s the best song EVER, in the WORLD, EVER!!! Thank you so much Dave. You have raised the stakes to all instruments! I accept your next challenge!”

Your move Nandi, we can’t wait to see what happens next. 

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0
Matt Ouellette 2021-07-27
Activision Blizzard logo
Photo Illustration by Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Activison Blizzard employees are staging a walkout on Wednesday, July 28th in response to the company’s handling of sexual harassment allegations brought by the state of California. Employees will meet outside Blizzard’s main campus in Irvine at 10AM PST. “We believe that our values as employees are not being accurately reflected in the words and actions of our leadership,” the organizers said in a statement.

The news comes after California sued the renowned gaming studio and its publisher, saying women were subjected to constant sexual harassment and discrimination at work. One female employee allegedly died by suicide after having nude photos of her passed around the office. Following the suit, numerous employees took to Twitter to...

Continue reading…

Matt Ouellette 2021-07-09
img
This week we discuss the proliferation of ebikes in bike-share networks, as well as the explosive growth of private ebike ownership.
Matt Ouellette 2021-06-25
img
Sending billionaires into space is "ground zero for everything that is right and wrong with society - we should focus on the planet we already have."
Matt Ouellette 2021-06-17
img
Dealmaster also has early Prime Day discounts, Philips Hue deals, and more.
Matt Ouellette 2021-05-27
img

More than a million IVF cycles and 260,000 donor insemination cycles have been performed in the UK since 1991 – but the picture of who is having this treatment has changed massively in the past three decades.

That’s according to a new report from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), which show 390,000 babies have been born from fertility treatment in that time – and more of them to single women, lesbian couples and women over 40 than ever.

The report also shows the meaningful medical advances in fertility treatment over the past 30 years, while highlighting the difficulties faced by individuals and couples accessing treatment across the country – echoing recent HuffPost UK investigations into the IVF postcode lottery.

5 Key Facts From The Report

1. More same-sex couples are having IVF

In 2019, 2,435 IVF cycles (4% of all cycles) involved a female partner – this is four times the 489 cycles in 2009.

2. More single women are having IVF

In 2019, 1,470 cycles (2%) involved no partner, compared to 565 in 2009 (1%).

3. More forty-somethings are having IVF

The proportion of IVF cycles undertaken by patients aged 40 and over has more than doubled from 10% (689 cycles) in 1991 to 21% (14,761 cycles) in 2019.

4. There really is an NHS postcode lottery

The level of NHS funding for fertility treatment varies across the UK, with 62% of cycles funded by the NHS in Scotland in 2019, falling to 20% in some parts of England.

5. But IVF has rising success rates

The report concludes that advances in technology and treatment over the past three decades have resulted in more successful outcomes, with birth rates for all patients under 43 improving year on year. In 1991 patients aged 35-37 had a live birth rate per embryo transferred of 6%, increasing to 25% in 2019.

Sarah Norcross, director of the fertility charity the Progress Educational Trust (PET), previously told HuffPost UK that it’s a positive move women have the choice to become mothers alone, but it’s a common misconception that women are delaying motherhood just to focus on careers. 

“Research suggests it is the lack of a male partner prepared to commit to parenthood that is the key driver for women choosing to become single mothers,” she said. 

“These are not women focused solely on their career and they are not necessarily women who have failed to find the man they want to have children with – it is the absence of a man ready to become a dad that has led to this reproductive choice.” 

Commenting on the latest report, she added that the number of same-sex female couples wishing to access fertility treatment shows how “the routes to family formation are changing,” – and adds that the NICE guidelines on same-sex fertility treatment should be updated to reflect this.

“The current situation, where same sex couples have to pay for six attempts at a pregnancy before they can access treatment, is unfair and needs to change,” she said.  

“The HFEA’s 2019 report also highlights the harsh reality of more than half a decade of cuts to NHS-funded fertility services in England, with potentially more to come later this year in the north London area. It is shocking that the East of England is now the worst place to live in the UK, with just 20% of treatment funded, when nearly a decade ago it was the best place to live.” 

Matt Ouellette 2021-03-11
img

When people learn that I’m in a polyamorous three-way relationship, or throuple, they understandably have questions.

But these questions aren’t the same questions you’d ask someone in a two-way relationship, questions like what’s their name? What do they do? Where did you meet? Instead, I get asked things like: so, do you always have threesomes? Which partner is your favourite? Do you all sleep in the same bed? 

These questions are harmless, even funny. I admit relationships like mine are still far from the norm, and I don’t mind answering them when people are just trying to understand how polyamory works.

Couples are the norm, represented in complex and honest ways in millions of movies, TV shows and books. I’ve yet to see a single good representation of polyamory in film or on TV. So it makes sense that when people ask questions about polyamory, they’re doing it through a filter that places traditional monogamy as the default.

But there’s one question that’s more problematic. “How can you be a feminist in that relationship?”

To unpack this, I need to give some context. I have been with my male partner, Paul, for eight years. We met Andrea just over a year ago. People encountering our female, female, male dynamic assume Paul is getting the most out of it.

They imagine him swaggering down the road with a woman under each arm. They imagine a non-stop orgy (one that’s flatteringly lit and airbrushed like mainstream porn). They assume the dynamic was his idea. They assume Andrea and I aren’t really into each other, that we’re both just doing it for his male approval – or that Andrea is trying to ‘steal’ him from me. 

Granted, my relationship throws these things into extreme relief. But these prejudices harm all kinds of relationships, as well as people who are single. 

Take the common misconception that Andrea wants to ‘steal’ Paul away from me. This assumes that a relationship (and most especially a monogamous two-person relationship) is the ultimate social success. That a person (but especially a woman) must be looking to couple-up, because otherwise they’re kind of failing at life. Anyone who’s felt depressed to be single on Valentine’s Day, or read an article about ‘cuffing season’ has probably felt this pressure. 

But not all women want relationships. We’re not more valid with a partner (or indeed partners). And we’re definitely not out to defeat one another in some kind of relationship Hunger Games.

Or take the assumption that Paul is somehow getting more out of our dynamic. This inherently positions Paul’s male experience as somehow more valid, and worth more, than a woman’s experience. It also plays into the scientifically disproven idea that men want sex more than women, as well as the disturbingly too common belief that bisexuality is not real

These assumptions harm all of us because they reaffirm misogynistic biases that put male experiences, and male preferences, first. It also suggests, quite offensively, that women like me and Andrea are essentially doormats incapable of making active choices about our relationships and our lives.

The first time a friend asked me how I can be a feminist in this relationship, I hadn’t thought so deeply about all this. I brought a whole bunch of assumptions to the table myself.

We’re definitely not out to defeat one another in some kind of relationship Hunger Games.

“No no no, it’s not like that,” I said instantly. I could have asked her to clarify, to explain what she meant, but I didn’t need to. I knew exactly what she meant – because her assumptions are the default. Rarely challenged, rarely even acknowledged. And that’s what makes them so pernicious. 

I explained to my friend that we are three people in a relationship. Three consenting adults who are open and honest with one another. Not two women being strung along by a man. Not a couple using another woman like a human sex toy. Not a couple that’s about to be split up by some kind of reality TV-style femme fatale.

The most worrying part is that my friend is someone who already gets this stuff. Polyamory wasn’t a shocking new concept to her, she understands feminism and gender and the idea of internalised misogyny. And that’s how powerful these prejudices are. They get into our heads even when we think we’ve overcome them.

The only way we can keep our prejudices in check is by acknowledging them and asking ourselves where they come from, and whether that’s something we really believe. Now, when people ask me “How can you be feminist in that relationship?” I ask a question of my own: “Why not?”

So, in fact, please do keep asking this question. But get ready to come up with the answer yourself.

Abby Moss is a freelance journalist. Follow her on Twitter @mossabigail

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

Matt Ouellette 2021-01-15
img
The online encyclopedia is an unlikely beacon of reliability.
Matt Ouellette 2020-10-22
img
COVID-19 can't kill Apple's ceremonial iPhone launches, as dozens lined up for the iPhone 12 launch in Sydney, Australia.
Matt Ouellette 2021-07-14
img
(University of California - Santa Barbara) UC Santa Barbara chemical engineering professor Michelle O'Malley has been named the recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) 2021 Allan P. Colburn Award. The award, named for a legendary professor who founded the University of Delaware chemical engineering department, recognizes significant contributions to chemical engineering through publications by younger members of the institute.
Matt Ouellette 2021-07-05
img
Trump wondered how Pence "could be such a 'stiff' and a 'square,'" Michael Wolff wrote in his new book.
Matt Ouellette 2021-06-24
img
A graphic that simply said "Q" was posted on McAfee's account after McAfee's death in a Spanish jail was announced.
Matt Ouellette 2021-06-12
img
Microsoft Edge browser game gives procrastinators yet another weapon for the arsenal.
Matt Ouellette 2021-05-15
img
Commentary: FPS Boost is incredible, but I'm still not completely satisfied with framerates on the Series S.
Matt Ouellette 2021-01-31
img
The audio-only app is capturing attention and readying for expansion.
Matt Ouellette 2020-12-28
img
Need some help picking your next wearable? We've put together a guide to the best Android smartwatches for 2020.
Matt Ouellette 2020-09-15
img

A 10-year-old drummer from Ipswich is fast on her way to achieving Rock God status.

Nandi Bushell – who you might recognise from last year’s Argos Christmas advert – took part in an epic drum-off with Dave Grohl to the song ‘Dead End Friends’ by his band, Them Crooked Vultures. And he was so impressed by her performance, he’s written a superhero theme tune especially for her.

Following their battle last week, Nandi said it was an “honour” to be able to drum with “the most awesome, fun, kind and legendary Dave Grohl”.

When Grohl declared she’d won the battle, he tweeted a hint that there was more to come: “You win round one... but it ain’t over yet! Buckle up, cuz I have something special in mind.”

And he didn’t disappoint. On Monday, he shared a video on the Foo Fighters Twitter account of him singing a song that he’d written and performed especially for Nandi – or, as Grohl describes her, “the number one drummer girl, the best drummer in the world”.

“Every superhero needs a theme song,” Grohl tweeted to the 10-year-old. “Here’s one for you!”

Not one to hide his talents, Grohl can be seen singing, drumming and playing guitar in the track, while his daughters (the Grohlettes) provide backing vocals, singing Nandi’s name throughout.

The song describes how Nandi is “always right on time” and a “hero wunderkind”.

“She’s got the power, she’s got the sound,” Grohl sings. “Nandi on the drums makes the world go round.”

Nandi was absolutely thrilled by the tune and can be seen clutching her face, wide-eyed and awestruck, as she watches Grohl perform.

“I can’t believe Mr. Grohl wrote a song about me!?!” she tweeted. “This is so so so #EPIC!! I think it’s the best song EVER, in the WORLD, EVER!!! Thank you so much Dave. You have raised the stakes to all instruments! I accept your next challenge!”

Your move Nandi, we can’t wait to see what happens next.